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Full text of "Sponsor"

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UNIV 



OF MD COLLEGE PARK 



3 mao D55^na3 



:^o LIBRARY 



t N.W. 
n. D.C 20036 



/-, 7ij-7(j 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2013 



Iittp://archive.org/cletails/sponsor134052spon 



3 OCTOBER 19S9 ^ | 

40< a copy • S8 • ymr 



SP 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS Usl^ 




Pulse, August, 1959, Richmond Metro- 
olitan Area. Monday ttirough Friday. 

lATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: 

ELECT STATION REPRESENTATIVES in 
lew York, Boston, Philadelphia, Balti- 
lore, Washington. CLARKE BROWN CO. 
1 Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, 
lew Orleans. DAREN F. McGAVREN CO. 
1 Chicago, Detroit, Seattle. Los An- 
eles, San Francisco. 



you think you had 
a hot August! 




was 




TOTAL LISTENERS..: 
IN ADULT LISTENERS...^ 
IN QUARTER HOURS...* 



nd, as always, FIRST in merchandising! 

in Richmond, the FIRST buy . . . the HOTTEST buy ... is 



WLEE 



» 



{ 



CHEVY FACES 
A CRUCIAL 
COUNT-DOWN 

A SPONSOR • exclusive, 
behind-the-scene look 
at what's happening 
in Detroit this yes 

Page 29 




I 

I 



I 



t 



TvB's new 
storehouse of 
tv infomation 

Page 33 

What they talked 
about last week 
in San Francisco 

Page 36 

NL&B sets new 
pattern for 
air media''' ..hiii 



Page 



ST ON PAQK 



I Tinsley, President Irving AbelofF, Senior Vice Pres. Harvey Hudson, Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 




The punchline of a famous old gag is ". . . but 
>vhat have you done for me lately?'^ 

What we have done for 14 different commercial 
clients "lately" provides some prime examples of 
the flexibility of Videotape* and the productive 
facilities of Videotape Center. 

Not including several half-hour and full hour 
showcase productions, here is the record for our 
most recent 28 possible days of shooting: 



Item: 24 actual days of shooting. 

Item: 54 completed commercials for 14 exact- 
ing clients. 

Item.: For one client, a full production commer- 
cial completed only 1 V'z days after the initial con- 
tact . . . for another, 3 days after. 

Item: A single day of shooting for a major cli- 
ent involved 5 different products and commercials, 
5 different announcers and 4 agencies. 



There Are Two Types of TV Advertisers Today... Those Who Are Usin^ Tape, 



mmm 




hem: One commercial "package" included 10- 
second I.D's and 20-second chain breaks for national 
spot tape play-back use. 

Item: Typical costs per commercial were $643, 
$1,830, $2,755 and $5,100 — vividly illustrating 
Videotape's adaptability to individual commercial 
requirements. 

Flexible? And how! Have you investigated the 
many advantages Videotape offers you . . . lately? 

and Those Who Are About To 



VIDEOTAPE PRODUCTIONS OF NEW YORK, I Ml 

205 West r)8th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 2-33i 

^ L 



Mark this market 
on your list! 

CENTRAL and 
SOUTH ALABAMA 

... one of 
Alqbama's 
"BIG THREE' 



WSFA-' 




mokileI 

WHY 

WSFA-TV 

IS DOMINANT 

IN CENTRAL 

AND SOUTH 

ALABAMA! 

WSFA-TV has the TOP SHOWS in 
an area of over one million population. 
The April '59 ARB survey proves the 
dominance of WSFA-TV . . . 

Top 10 Shows 

WSFA-TV 9 90% 

Station "C" I 10% 

Top 15 Shows 

WSFA-TV 13 86% 

Station "C" 2 14% 

WSFA-TV placed five syndicated shows 
in the Top 30 while Station "C" placed 
none in the Top 50. A furtlier indica- 
tion of WSFA-TV 's acceptance. 

OVER A MILLION VIEWERS IN 
35 ALABAMA COUNTIES* 

Population 1,106,000 

Effective Buying Income $1,201,510,000 

Retail Sales 799,440,000 

Food Store Sales 217,402,000 

Drug Store Sales .. 23,964,000 

Automotive Sales - 157,280,000 

Gasoline Service Station Sales 74,867,000 

Mark Central and South Alabama on 
your list ... buy it with WSFA-TV! 

* Market area defined by Television Magazine, plus 6 
counties consistently proving regular reception. Does 
not include 3 Georgia and 3 Florida bonus counties. 

{Data from Sates Management Survey of Buying Power) 

WSFA-TV 

MONTGOMERY 

Channel 1 2 NBC/ABC 

IHE WIty TEtEVrSION SrSIEM, INC. • WKY.TV ANO WKY OKLAHOMA CITf 
WTVT TAMPA-5T. PETE«S«UI!0 

Represented by the Kalz Agency 



.-Pi Vol. 11. \.K 40 • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Chevy faces a crucial countdown 

29 SPOivsoR gets an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at what goes on in 
the advertising agency of an automotive account in a year of decision 

New storehouse of tv information 

33 Video's promotion arm publishes what is probably most comprehensive 
study of tv viewing. Emphasis is on people reached, rather than homes 

'We must rediscover the individual man' 

36 Westinghouse conference of pros on the West Coast tells 350 radio and 
tv broadcasters what originality is, why you need it, how you get it 

Why advertisers join Knickerbocker on tv 

38 New \ ork brewery gets added reach for .|2 million ad budget via joint 
promotions with other advertisers; here's what tie-ins have brought 

Taystee Bread's new Tin Pan Alley sell 

40 American Bakeries' new bread-selling technique: 2V2-minute commer- 
cials with 6 original tunes, developed by Y&R replacing all other media 

NL&B's new 3-way radio/ tv setup 

4X Chicago agency sets new organization pattern with three equal depart- 
ments handling air media timebuying, commercials and programing 

How radio gives zip to stocks 

43 Denver brokerage firm gets flavor, trading fever into five-minute 
financial reports, ties commercials to print ads, promotes show heavily 



FEATURES 

60 Film-Scope 

24- 49th and Madison 

64 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

■^'4 Newsmaker of the Week 
64 Picture Wrap-Up 
80 Seller's Viewpoint 
SO Sponsor Asks 
12 Sponsor Backstage 



62 Sponsor Hears 
17 Sponsor-Scope 
82 Sponsor Speaks 
44 Spot Buys 
82 Ten-Second Spots 

9 Timebuyers at Work 
78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
48 Tv Results 
S9 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications ISl^^^ 

Audit of Circulations Inc. e_JUEU 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation and 
Advertisins Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore II, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17. N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



3,000 
FEATURE 



TITLES 



OTHER 
STATIONS 
COMBINED 



20th CENTURY 



ALLIED 
ARTISTS 

PARAMOUNT 

UNITED 
ARTISTS 



/ 





/ 



\J(><^ kmw- tulie^ 





WIT! TV 



X 



C — diL 




EXPERIENCED HANDS to help build your sales 
in one of America's most prosperous markets. 
Call BLAIR today for top rated minutes. 



a 



STORER 



station 



National Representatives 
BLAIR TELEVISION ASSGCIATF''^ 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



MEMO 




*and when you do, 
you'll discover why 
scores of national 
and regional adver- 
tisers have followed 
the trend to... WIST! 

These Two Reports 










will tell the practiced eye 
more in 10 minutes than we 
could tell you in pages and 
pages. 

Seeing is believing. Take 
a look — see for yourself! 
Your PGW Colonel will be 
glad to show you copies. 

f fiey'// tell you wh y . . . 

PTTtTi 

is the best radio buy 

in Charlotte 

A BROADCASTING COMPANY OF THE SOUTH STATION 



I 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



ISine times out of 10, when an industry sets out to explain 
itself to the public it winds up picking a ^'^ front man'''' rather 
than someone steeped in the business. The tv industry has 
not made this mistake. For its top spokesman, the NAB- 
created Television Information Committee picked a man who 
is a diligent, serious itulustry member with wide experience. 

The neiA^Smaker: Louis Hausman, in the top echelon of 
CBS since 1950, quit his job last week to become director of the 
newly-formed Television Information Office. Who would be chosen 
for this important post has been a matter of speculation ever since 
the National Association of Broadcasters created TIO last April. 

It is significant that an arm of the NAB formed to explain the tv 
industry to the public should have as its head a man who not only 
knows the industry inside-out, but has the research ability to probe 
the public — not beguile it. , 

As Clair R. McCollough, chair- 
man of the Committee which se- 
lected Hausman told SPONSOR, "We 
needed a man skilled in the analy- 
sis and presentation of facts and 
acquainted with every facet of the 
industry." (Hausman's post at 
CBS was v.p. of advertising and 
sales promotion for radio net- 
works, though his activities ex- 
tended into tv). 

Appointment of a tough-fibre 
research man instead of a toast- 
master general to this post is in line with the aims of TIO, as out- 
lined by McCollough: (1) to establish the confidence of the public 
in the tv industry, (2) to research the likes, dislikes and wishes of the 
public, (3) to be an industry spokesman with government and civic 
groups, and (4) to do all this without whitewash. 

To achieve these aims, Hausman and his TIO will have roughly 
$500,000 to spend during the first year, $700,000 for the second year, 
another $700,000 in the third year. It is understood that networks 
and stations have so far pledged about $500,000: ABC— $45,000; 
CBS— $75,000; NBC— $75,000; The NAB— $75,000. 

In addition to McCollough (of the Steinman stations), the nine- 
man committee which selected Hausman consists of Kenneth W. 
Bilby (NBC), Roger W. Clipp (Triangle stations), Michael J. Foster 
(ABC), John S. Hayes {Washington Post Broadcasting Division), 
C. Wrede Petersmeyer (Corinthian Broadcasting Co.), Lawrence H. 
Rogers II (WSAZ-TV, Huntington. West Va.). Charles S. Steinberg 
(CBS TV), Willard E. Walbridge (KTRK-TV, Houston, Texas). 

Hausman starts work with a staff of 10. TIO's office is at 666 Fifth 
Avenue. Its phone number: PLaza 7-4600. ^ 




Louis Hausman 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 

KWKY, Des Moines, Iowa APPOINTS [ASWAN 



mm. 



QUICKIE QUIZ FOR TIMEBUYERS 



BE THE FIRST TIMEBUYER TO GUESS 
KWKY'S HOOPER SHARE OF AUDIENCE IN 
DECEMBER 1959. . .AND ... 



'Ai 



11 



JUST FILL IN YOUR ESTIMATE HERE 
AND MAIL TO: 

JIM RAMSBURG, QUICKIE QUIZ 
KWKY RADIO 
A- DES MOINES, IOWA 



MAILlDDAlj! 

IN CASE OF TIES, THE TIME- 
BUYER'S ENTRY BEARING THE 
EARLIEST POSTMARK WILL BE 
DECLARED WINNER. 



/ 



/ 



Vf* 



I 



TIMEBUYER 
AGENCY 




robert e. eastman & co., 



inc. 



representing major radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

527 Madison Avenue 
New York 22, N.Y. 
PLaza 9-7760 



CHICAGO: SAN FRANCISCO: 

333 N. Michigan Ave. Russ BIdg. 

Chicago, Illinois San Francisco, Cal. 

Financial 6-7640 YUkcn 2-9760 



DALLAS: ST. LOUIS: 

211 North Ervay BIdg. Syndicate Trust BIdg. 
Dallas, Texas 915 Olive St. 

Riverside 7-2417 St. Louis, Missouri 

CEntral 1-6055 



LOS ANGELES: 

Taft Building 
1680 N. Vine St. 
Hollywood. Cal. 
Hollywood 4-7276 



DETROIT: 

Book Buildi'- 
Detroit, ' 
wood. . D-5457 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



P 

1 



THAT'S ALL SHE 




IN 
MILWAUKEE 

NO. 1 



WRIT leads the Milwaukee Market 
from 7:30 in the morning 'till 6:00 
in the evening, Monday through 
Friday in the average quarter-hour 
ratings! (A. C. Nielsen — June- 
July, 1959) 




MILWAUKEE 

Bernie Strachota, General Manager 
Parker Daggett, Sales Manager 



WIL 

Si. llBiS 

KBQX 
WRIT 



Boy Radio wleti pu kf lerfis 
Boy Baiate ilien p iyy mk 
Buy WHT wtes p bay Milwaotee 
and you TOT tie pple wte Silt 

THE 6AU6AN STATIONS 

/■/? tempo with the times 
John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director 

Sofa Nationally by 

Robert E. Eastman 



SPONSOR 

THC WCEKLV MAGAZINE TV/RAOIO ADVCRTISCRS tJSC 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 

Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Charles Eckert; 
Gilda Gomez 



Power Ratings! 



The NUMBER ONE 

RADIO STATION 

in SAGINAW-BAY CITY 

for the 5th CONSECUTIVE 

YEAR —{Pulse)- 



Power Personalities! 



1^ Bob Dyer ^ Harry Porterfield 
-^ Dove Skinner ^ Phil Boiler 
■j!^ Art Allen ^^ Mike Chamberlain 
■^ Dwoyne Riley ^ Dave Millan 
"5^ Dave Kushler ^ Dick Davis 



X 



.^ 



TEN TIMES 

MORE POWER 



Power Coverage! 

"2 



^>K. 



1 M/V 



.5M/V 




A Giant New MICHIGAN MARKET 

of more than 1,000,000 

High-Income People 



10,000 WATTS 

Outslate Michigan's Most 
Powerful Radio Station 

WKNX 

SAGINAW, MICHIGAN 



Kepresented By GILL-PERNA 

NEW YORK— CHICAGO— LOS ANGELES 
DETROIT— SAN FRANCISCO— BOSTON 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



m 



m^ 



"CHICAGO, HUH? 

WHERE WERE 

YOU BETWEEN 6 PM 

AND MIDNIGHT?" 



f- ..<^ 



m 



m\ 



"j--'-y^: 



#:■■■. - 





t^-fi 



iiJ>. 






From 6 PM to Midnight, Monday through Friday-when Chicago's largest audiences are 
watching television-WNBQ's average share of audience is 34%. The next station's is 26.7%. A 
27% lead for WNBQ? WNBQ • CHANNEL 5 IN CHICAGO NBC Owned ■ Sold by NBC Spot Sales 



*ARB, Aug. 1959 




at work 




Jacquelin Molinaro, Cole, Fischer, Rogow, Inc., Beverly Hills, 
feels that the reps are not servicing the agencies the way they should. 
'"The current demand for prime time in radio has created a seller's 
market. This has created a trend among the reps to become mere 
order takers, rather than imaginative and informative salesmen. 
Pushing the top station does not 
necessarily mean it is always the 
best buy for the client. And the 
buyer is often advised, in a take it 
or leave it basis, 'here are the 
availabilities . . . better buy them 
now before we sell them to your 
competitor.' These spots usually 
wind up rammed in between three 
or four others in addition to a 
couple of station promotion spots." 
Jacquelin also believes that many 
of the station rate increases do not 
reflect sound economic thinking. "There's no ilexibility for the vol- 
ume buyer. And, the buyer who wants to buy 60, 70 or 100 spots 
per week doesn't get any price break with his large order. The fan- 
tastic premium some stations charge for traffic time would lead a 
novice to believe no one listens to radio except during peak hours." 

Beryl Seidenberg, head timebuyer at Kastor, Hilton, Chesley, Clif- 
ford & Atherton, Inc., New York, feels that in some agencies the 
timebuyer plays too small a role in planning and executing campaign 
strategy. "Off on a small island with two one-way telephones, avail- 
ability sheets and rating data, the buyer makes errors because he 

doesn't know enough about the cli. 
ent's objectives. He gets the word 
on the incoming phone, checks his 
data, and buys via the outgoing 
line. It's a bleak picture and can 
result in quite a mess." Beryl 
notes, however, that at her agency 
the buyer works in conjunction 
with other departments, attends 
client-agency meetings, learns the 
history of the product and. at the 
same time, gains a fuller under- 
standing of the client's aims. "The 
buyer is a field worker and has access to the best source of infor- 
mation on availabilities, costs, programing, station trends and new 
developments. He may spot a certain slant in the copy that a par- 
ticular station might be reluctant to air. Thus, the rote buver does 
only half a job. Communication and interdependence are the keys 
to intelligent buying and the source of the successful campaign." 




SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



"NATURALLY, I 
LISTEN TO KFWB" 

"For the satisfaction I get 
from a perfectly tuned, pre- 
cision machine that makes 
a winner, give me sportscar 
competition. 

In the realm of broadcast- 
ing, that same precision . . . 
perfectly tuned . . . comes 
through to me with KFWB 
... so, naturally, I listen to 
KFWB. It's a winner!" 




The KFWB audience gives 
you more men, more wom- 
en, more children . . . more 
everybodies . . . than any 
other Los Angeles station. 

Buy KFWB . . .first in Los 
Angeles. 




6419 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28. HO 3' 

ROBERT M. PURCELL, President and G>- 
lAMES F. SIMONS, Gen. Sales Manr. 
Represented nationally by JOHN biAi ^ fc CO. 



36 
24 
36 



62,000,000 

These are the pertinent dimensions of the young lady 
from Natchez when she became the new Miss America 
on the night of September 12. 

Because it happens at a time when a new television season 
is just beginning, this annual contest has come to be a 
measure of television itself. 

The 62 million viewers who witnessed the coronation 
of Miss America (and the introduction of the new 
products of the Philco Corporation) constituted the largest 
audience in the history of the ceremonies. 

At the time of the broadcast three out of every four 
television homes in the country had their sets turned on 
—and tivo out of the three were watching Miss America. 

In the past year the number of television homes increased 
again— by 2%. And the audience to this CBS Television 
Network broadcast ivas greater by 7%. 

These measurements of the first special broadcast of the new 
season reflect not only television's constantly increasing 
dimensions, but the ability of the CBS Television Network 
to continue to attract the largest audiences in television. 

It is the first clear sign that the nation's viewers and 
advertisers will be getting more out of television this year 
than ever before. 



IJ 



CBS® 



YO. 

can 





by Joe Csida 



of Mississippi 
Retail Saks . . . 

^918,000,000 

IN THE SOUTH'S 

FASTEST GROWING 

TV MARKET 

Jackson, Miss. ^ 

with these Jackson 
stations 

WelTv 12 



KATZ 



WlbT t 

HOLLINGBERY 



^^ Nation's business gains leader 




Como— crooner ^ith portfolio 

The first Backstage column I did for sponsor, 
almost five years ago, dealt with Perry Como's 
total loyalty and consistent, all-out effort to do a 
solid job for his sponsor. Perry's bankroller at 
the time was Chesterfield, and he worked for 
them on and off camera. I told about the night 
I was doing a record session with him (I was 
the a&r head of RCA Victor at the time) , and he 
laughingly knocked a pack of Old Golds off my control room table 
and replaced them with a Chesterfield pack. All in good, clean fun, 
but making the point vividly nevertheless. 

Today, on the very eve of his debut for a new sponsor, Kraft, 
Perry works harder, more conscientiously and (in my book) with 
increasing talent for his new advertiser. Cynics may say that a guy 
should work hard for the $25,000,000 Como's Kraft deal will earn 
for him and his organizations. But in Como's case, believe me, the 
money is not the answer. He has a pride in his work unparalleled 
by any performer, as far as I know, in the whole history of show 
business. 

Takes lead behind-the-scene 

General Artists Corp., the agency which books him, has turned 
down offers of $25,000 per week and up because Perry did not care 
to play certain kinds of engagements. And these were dates virtually 
every other star in Como's category was leaping to play. They meant 
that Perry would be away from home an undue length of time, so he 
just refused to play them. Those who know Perry, know how he 
hates to hit the road (he had his fill of that in the late thirties and 
early forties with Ted Weems and other bands). But it's another 
indication of the manner in which he is approaching his Kraft deal: 
He spent several weeks this precious off-the-air summer visiting Kraft 
plants in this country and Canada. He talked to Kraft personnel, 
thus doing a fine morale-building job, sparking interest in the com- 
pany's upcoming Como shows, while at the same time learning for 
himself, just how the company paying him ran its business. You'll 
see the results of this self-briefing in the way Como does the com- 
mercials this fall, I'm sure. 

Perr)' is also, as each season goes by, becoming more and more 
the true chief executive officer of his Roncom Productions, as well as 
a performer who grows in stature each year. All you have to do is 
go through one week of a Como show to become aware of this. In 
his own quiet way — and without interfering in any way with the 
individual tasks of producer, director, etc. — Perry runs the show in 
the fullest meaning of the phrase. Roncom presently employs almost 
three hundred people, and to all of them Perry is the boss. He works 



12 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



hard and most seriousl\ to deliver ihe best show that talent and fully 
adequate rehearsals can put on the tube. And so does every other 
individual connected with the show. It's for these reasons that I 
believe, even without having seen the first of the Como Kraft shows, 
that Perry will stay way up there in the ratings and do the best sell- 
ing job for Kraft that they've ever had done. And they've, as you 
know, employed some master star-salesmen, going all the way back to 
their Kraft Music Hall radio days. 

National's rock and rollers 

Smaller advertisers than Kraft, of course, continue to utilize the 
talents of singers with lesser names than Mr. C to pitch their prod- 
ucts. Sometimes wisely. Sometimes in a manner to baffle me. I'm 
thinking of the National Shoe Co., a New York account. Mogul, 
Williams & Saylor. its advertising agency, finally heard all about rock 
and roll, and presumably somebody at the agency came up with the 
bright idea of appealing to the teen-age National Shoe customers by 
utilizing rock and roll singers as the salesmen for the company. 
They're buying radio time in about forty markets, and utilizing 
spots on such sound teen-age shows as the Alan Freed Big Beat show 
on WNEW-TV in New York. The idea is that the rock and roll 
singers they hire will do the National Shoe commercials, and the 
agency will attempt to persuade the tv and radio stations to integrate 
these with the playing of the kids' regular commercial records. 

All this, of course, is fine. Good, solid, straight-line thinking. 
But — this is where they baffle me. The four singers MW&S bought 
are Dick Roman, Laurie Loman. Jeannie Thomas and Tommy Mara. 
All four are nice enough kids, and all four do indeed make records. 
Mara, with a vast hypo on the part of his manager-press agent, even 
came up with a record that made enough noise to give some people 
the impression it was a lukewarm hit. It wasn't. Neither of the four 
youngsters, to my knowledge, has ever had a record anywhere near 
the top ten. 

Unknowns make poor buy 

Now if it were difficult, let alone impossible, for National Shoe to 
buy better known rock and roll record artists at nominal prices, I 
would not be quite so confused by their purchase of the four young- 
sters named. But any quick check of the young record stars with 
records currently on the big 100 charts of the record trade papers, 
will turn up a neat dozen or more "hot" young rock and roll artists 
who would fall all over themselves to do a job of this kind. Obvi- 
ously, I don't mean the Bobby Darins or Paul Ankas, or Elvis Pres- 
leys, the Fabians or the Avalons. They're all, plainly, far too high 
priced. But. as I said, there are at least a dozen newer record stars 
in this area, who would make far better bets for a teen-age program, 
than the struggling youngsters National is using. 

I have long advocated the use of performers, from top names to 
competent youngsters, as on-and-off-the-air salesmen for advertisers. 
But it's more effective. I believe, when the agency has some idea of 
what it's buying. I believe J. Walter Thompson, even at a figure 
like $25,000,000 made an extremely smart buy in Mr. Como. while 
Mogul. Williams & Saylor made a rather inept buy in taking on the 
lineup of youngsters they chose. 

In the few lines I've got left I'd like to wish Bob Swezey. who has 
just resigned from active management of WDSU. New^ Orleans, the 
very best luck in whatever new task he tackles. I liope it will be 
deserving of his vast talents as a broadcasting statesman. ^ 



X 



i 



Univenily of Oregon — fugene, Oregon 



Nearly l^ of Oregon's 
buying families watch 

KVAL-TV 

KPic-rv 



The only clear-picture in the 
Eugene - Springfield - Roseburg 
market is on KVAL-KPIC. One 
order to your Hollingbery man 
or Art Moore and Associates 
(Portland-Seattle) covers both 
stations. 



KVAL-TV fygene 

NBC AHiliate Channel 



m 



KPIC-TV Roseburg 

Satellite 



Channel 4 






WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand of 
all Indiana TV stations! 



One hundred and eleven national 
and regional spot advertisers 
know that the Terre Haute 
market is not covered 
effectively by outside TV 



WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL lO • CBS— ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIAN^ 

Represent -.ationally 

by f ing Co. 







SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



13 




COPYRIGHT BY RAND McNALLY CO. RL59Y62 



9«»«sw Bf. 



Vteterl*® 



it $k«ai-lt 





WIDE OPEN CIRCUIT! 

The latest Nielsen Coverage Survej' 
for Washington shows a phenomenally 
increased WKC-TV market . . . 87.8 ^v penetration 
(900,100 TV homes) in its total coverage area. 
For the advertiser who needs 
thorough penetration of the vast 
Greater Washington distribution area. 
WRC-TV not only delivers all of 
metropolitan Washington, but 50 additional 
counties in the neighboring- states of 
Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia ! 

Throughout this area. WRC-TV provides 
broader coverage and Uiiger weekly 
unduplicated circulation than any other 
Washington station. And, with impact 
to match, for in the 5-county metropolitan 
area which ARB measures, WRC-TV has delivered 
Washington's largest share-of -audience 
for ten consecutive months ! 

With WRC-TVs new, simplified 

Rate Card Number 15, it's easier than ever 

for you to i)ut these facts to profitable use. 

For your next campaign, put your mess' 

on Washington's biggest and best cu.-;^mer circuit . 

.....»».,>..,||lll^|>y^ Channel 4 in Washington, D. C. 

X BC Owned Sold by NBC Spot Sales 



I LUE 






Series 



Post-Herald l^^th %t^ ^ra 




The mastheads above represent some of the fine 
Tennessee, Kentucky and Alabama newspapers that 
carry WSM-TV program schedules regularly. More 
important, they also represent the fact that a 
tremendous three-state region looks regularly to 
WSM-TV for information, education and 
entertainment.... 

This is true because WSM-TV has consistently 
gone beyond the usual, not just in promoting pro- 
grams, but in building programs that serve the 
needs and interests of its entire coverage area. 

Ask Hi Bramham or any Petry man how much 
richness this penetration can add to your sales song. 



"WSIvl 



Nashville, Tennessee 



Represented 61/ 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



The Original Station Representative 




OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
16 SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 
news of the week with interpretation 
in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



3 OCTOBER 1959 

OtPKllM IMt 

MOMSOR 

PUBLICATIONS IMC. 



Chase & Sanborn Coffee (JWT), after a long lapse, has again become a ma- 
jor spot radio buyer. 

The schedule: 40 markets, five weeks, 12 spots a vreek. 



Montgomery Ward is trying to find out via a two-week test on WBBM, Chicago, 
what radio can do to increase the circulation of its fall sale book. 

(The book is a supplement to the com^iany's mailorder catalog and normally is 
mailed direct to catalog customers.) 

The newly-formed Fm Broadcasters Assn. has devised a novel way to raise 
money for a research fund for its own field. 

Each member is to contribute a certain number of spots per week which will be 
sold as a package to a national advertiser. 

There's an automotive account in the offing for this deal. 



Another repercussion of the boom in spot tv: Some broadcasters are asking 
agencies to cut back the number of spots in their fall schedules so that stations can 
add more advertisers to their lists. 

The stations explain that their motive is to have as many advertising eggs in their 
baskets as possible. 

Agencies, in rejecting the bid, retort that taking half a loaf means an increase in 
the rate per spot fon the theory that the other half wouldn't earn them the same discount 
on the second station in the market.) 



Here are the top 15 radio markets in national-regional spot billings for 1958 

as compiled by the FCC, with local billings included for comparison: 



MARKET 


NO. 


STATIONS 


N. Y. metropolitan 


36 


Chicago 




27 


Los Angeles 




28 


Detroit 




11 


Philadelphia 




21 


Boston 




17 


San Francisco-Oak. 


18 


St. Louis 




14 


Washington 




17 


Cleveland 




8 


Cincinnati 




7 


Mpls.-St. Paul 




12 


Kansas City 




9 


Baltimore 




14 


Houston 




11 


'Reporting to 


FCC. 





NATIONAL-REGIONAL 

$24,569,699 
11,123,235 
7,340,538 
5,897,405 
5,041,580 
4,234,901 
4,151,804 
3,399,394 
2,908,160 
2,762,319 
2,758,008 
2,326,788 
1,871,952 
1,788,599 
1,771,695 



LOCAL 

S13,723,119 
9,672,474 
10,838,475 
4,477.393 
6,224,809 
1.940.393 
4,588.671 
3.577.033 
3,832,582 
2,583,819 
1,637.987 
2,862,106 
2.431.658 
3.372.854 
2.472,715 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Kansas City has become the latest focal point of the Midwest coffee war. 

Hills Bros, and Maxwell House pulled a fast attack on what had been Folger's 
own market (60% share) — apparently in retaliation for Folger's recent assault on the Chi- 
cago coffee market with saturation campaigns and special promotions. 

It's said that Folger has had to use a million it had earmarked for a San Fran- 
cisco promotion to strike back in Kansas City. 



The average cost-per-lOOO-homes-per-commercial minute on nighttime network 
tv this summer went down to $4.53 — a very gratifying figure for that time of year. 

These CPMHPCMs are Nielsen's calculations for programing between 6 p.m. and 
11 p.m. over seven days for each year's July-August span: 



NETWORK 

ABC TV 
CBS TV 
NBC TV 

Average 



1959 

$4.15 
4.58 
4.82 

$4.53 



1958 

$4.42 
4.51 
5.00 

$4.67 



1957 

14.74 
4.33 
5.02 

$4.65 



International Latex has two agencies collecting availabilities this week — Reach- 
McClinton for gargles (Isodine) and Bates for girdles (Playtex). 

The girdles search is for minutes (late night or around news programs), while the Iso- 
dine deal involves so many ratings points at a stipulated cost-per-thousand. 

• Chicago spot tv activity includes Cracker Jack (Burnett), Flake (C. E. Frank), 
Top Value Stamps (Campbell-Mithun), and Dutch Cleanser (E. H. Weiss). 

P&G's spot tv quest of the week: daytime minutes for Ivory Liquid (Compton). 



With the big surge in spot tv this fall has come a narrowing of product pro- 
tection in certain respects. 

Stations are less mindful of the various types of protection often required by an 
advertiser — such as separating cigarettes, dentifrices, and mouthwashes; or beers and soft 
drinks. 

Says one rep : "If business keeps up the wav it is long enough, a lot of the restraints 
dreamed up by agency people will go the way of the carbon mike." 



As it turns out, the SUA was quite modest in its estimates of what national spot 
radio did in 1958. 

The FCC's figures just released show $171.9 million, or 1.4% higher than 
1957. The SRA's estimate was $166.3 million, a decrease of 1.9%. 

All radio in 1958, according to the FCC, did $523.1 million, 1% over '57. 
nie four national and three regional networks accounted for $69.4 million, or 5.6% below 
the previous year, while local station sales totalled $323.2 million, a plus margin of 2%. 

Over 1,100 of the 3,200 stations reporting said they lost money in 1958. 



Even with spot billings going so well, tv stations still are bedeviled by the prob- 
lem of how to dispose of less attractive marginal time. 

A couple of the more aggressive and farsighted reps are urging their stations to ex- 
amine these unsold periods and determine whether a more realistic rate ought to 
be adopted. 

Argue these reps: The sale of this marginal time — at more attractive rates — may add 
only 10% to the billings; but that additional revenue coidd add appreciably to profits. 



18 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



An example of how ABC TV is becoming alert to public service and prestige op- 
portunities is its snapping up of the L.A. Dodgers-Milwaukee Braves playoff games 
this week. 

Accounts that were able to move fast as sponsors for this series were L&M via DFS 
and Revlon-Schick. Y&R had General Foods in line as a co-sponsor until practically the 
last minute. 

Prices paid by ABC for the rights: $300,000 for tv, and $75,000 for radio. 

KOTV, Tulsa, has come up with a resourceful use of tv-tape for a regular 
series. 

It sends a reel of blank tape to a station where a touring personality it wants to in- 
terview is doing a broadcast. The accommodating station sets uj) the cameras and the reel 
of blank tape and a KOTV staffman interviews the personality by phone. 

Then KOTV airs the combined results. 

Corinthian, which owns KOTV, plans to make this a regular thing for all its stations. 
Note: The device may come in handy for spot advertisers who may want to link 
in a local personality with the commercial done by a syndicated star. 

Have you any doubts about the various advantages that accrue to a nighttime tv 
network advertiser as he increases the number of stations in his lineup? 

Here's an example, as applied by Nielsen to a year-round high-rating program: 



FACTORS 


57 STATIONS 


97 STATIONS 


146 STATIONS 


Time-talent cost 


$70,700 


$78,100 


$82,200 


Coverage U.S. tv homes 


86.0% 


94.8% 


97.0% 


Rating 


30.7 


34.7 


37.1 


Audience share 


41.9 


47.5 


50.8 


Homes 


10,375,000 


12,930,000 


14,148,000 


Cost-per-1000 


$2.48 


$2.19 


$2.12 



Look for a lot more competitive steam for air media to come out of the con- 
fectionery field with the turn of the new year. 

Budgets in the bar candy field have been zooming the past few years, largely because 
of the revolution in packaging and the fact that multi-pack and bulk sales in supermar- 
kets account for around 70% of total bar and package sales. 

Theatre lobby sales also have contributed to bar packaging changes: the movie 
concessions prefer to have the sweets priced at 25^ or so. 

As it is, tv stations are loaded with schedules from many of the leading national 
and regional candy bar and package manufacturers — Mars, Curtiss, Necco, Brach, Kraft, 
Cracker Jack, Welsh — just to name a few. 

For an insight into how the newcomers on the nighttime tv networks are doing, 

here are some ratings and shares culled from Arbitron Multi-City reports. 



SHOW 


RATING 


SHARE 


SHOW 


KATIXG 


SHARE 


Staccato 


11.6 


25.8 


Fibber McGee 


11.8 


23.6 


Troubleshooters 


8.9 


20.6 


June Allyson 


20.2 


47.4 


Bonanza 


15.1 


36.5 


Dennis O'Keefe 


9.8 


21.4 


Man & Challenge 


15.6 


35.5 


Bronco 


8.2 


19.9 


The Deputy 


16.9 


34.2 


Love & Marriage 


10.6 


23.7 


Riverboat 


9.4 


21.6 


Sunday Showcase 


10.3 


18.8 


Laramie 


14.8 


35.4 








Here's how the 


early speci: 


lis have 


fared : 






Arthur Godfrey 


25.2 


46.2 


Coca-Cola 


18.6 


36.4 


Miss America 


34.7 


66.6 


Jerome Kern 


16.6 


31.3 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE cotinued 



TvB's sales development will try to counteract the current emphasis by buy- 
ers on minutes (as against 20s and I.D.'s) with a new presentation: Maximum Expo- 
sure — Minimum Expense. 

It's now in the writing stage and will be available to members toward the end of 
this month. 

The electric shaver field estimates that the sale of the women's mechanism 
will go to around 2.5 million units next year; the men's item will reach about six 
million. 

Contributions to tv from this field for the current quarter are running at a record 
level. Remington leads the pack with about $3 million; Shick is next with about $2.5 
million; Sunbeam is putting up $1.9 million; and Norelco about $1 million. 

Tv spot hasn't become completely defeatist about resurrecting the concept of 
the year-around franchise for national advertisers. 

Armour (FCB) is giving serious consideration to such a plan as advanced by a 
rep. The latter's presentation points out (1) the advantage of being able to rotate products 
at strategic and seasonal times, and (2) the privilege of upgrading spots to the better 
adjacencies that go with a franchise. 

The TvB is developing a food industry sales index that could jolt the packers 
on the West Coast out of their complacency. 

Preliminary figures show that the West Coast packers — hardly consistent or substantial 
advertisers — ^are losing their shares of the market as compared to national competi- 
tors or East Coast colleagues. 

This may have significance for the future: The ratings of situation-comedy strips 
on the tv networks have been dropping oflf steadily since the youngsters returned 
to school. 

Ponder the networks: Maybe the situation type (or even the western) isn't the an- 
swer to the pressing problem of programing for the housewife. 

A couple samples of what's been happening to daytime situation strips, according 
to Arbitron Multi-City: 

PROGRAM 21-25 SEPT. 14-18 SEPT. 7-11 SEPT. 

I Love Lucy (CBS) 3.9 (29 share) 6.2 (33 share) 6.4 (35 share) 

Gale Storm (ABC) 0.8 ( 7 share) l.S (12 share) 2.6 (15 share) 

As often happens when business turns good, the ego factor on the part of giant 
advertisers becomes a problem for agency managements. 

An agency will have devised a product-by-product campaign, deliberately measured and 
planned, when suddenly the account raises the question whether the institutional ef- 
fect hasn't been subordinated too much to the product sell. 

Naturally, this throws the whole plan into a spin, and the agency may have to restart 
the campaign plan from scratch. 

If you watch closely, you may note the increase of corporate emphasis in the 
commercials of some of the more costly network tv series this season. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 44; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 64; Washington Week, page 59; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 62; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 60. 

20 SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



Only Kprc-TV? 



Yes, only KPRC-TV. Because only KPRC-TV has CH-2, 

most effective selling agent put in television. Thousands 
rely on KPRC-TV and only KPRC-TV to stimulate 
sales. Only KPRC-TV— the station for people who 
like results. 




Courtesy of 

Dial 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBEK 1959 



21 



ooo ooo 



ooOOo< 



O^^OOo o^^^OO OOOOOOO OOOOOO OOOOOO QOO oo o oooooo OooOOc 






'o ol 



01 



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o o o o 




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lo O 






> Don't 
come 
unglued, 

Smidleyl 



Other timebuyeis must have your problem. 
You've just got to look at this Cascade market 
a little differently. Sure, it takes a four-station 
network to do it, but the Cascade's market has 
more population than Kansas City or Denver. 
More retail sales than Salt Lake City or Wor- 
cester. And don't forget this, Smidley, it's like 
a giant single station buy. Cascade is the only 
television serving tiie whole area. 





TELEVISION 



KIMA-TV 
KBAS-TV 



YAKIMA, WASH 



ErHDATA, 
MOSES LAKE. WASH 



CHLANO. 
CK, WASH 



"trK"IV KENNEWIC 

|/| f \A/_T\/ lEWlSTON, IDA 



For Facts and figures: 

Notional Represenfatives: Pocific Northwest; 

GEORGE P. HOLIINGBERY Company MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



49th an( 
Madison 



Balloon-burst 

My ole' pappy used to say, "Never 
look a gift horse in the mouth." 
Years in the radio business have 
taught us that the sponsor is ahvays 
right . . . and the pages of sponsor 
have ahvays been kind to KXOK. 
However, on page 83 of the 12 Sep- 




24 



tember sponsor vou gave KMOX 
credit for the KXOK "Safety Salute" 
Labor Dav balloon promotion. 

We are sure that SPONSOR will want 
to set this little "typo ' right and we 
are sending along a supply of KXOK 
balloons ( like the one pictured I in 
case vour boss "blows up" like ours 
did. ' 

John Corrigan 

KXOK 

St. Louis 

Pops is tops 

Re "Hitch Your Wagon to a Pop 
Star" ( Sponsor Backstage. 8 Septem. 
her 19591. thanks! 

Raw rock music has. I feel, been 
loo closely associated with any radio 
o|.cration that bears the "indepen- 
dent" or "modern" label. And. in 
turn, the local personality has been 
too closeK linked with rock and roll 
music. 

Lengthy papers could be written 
on the entertainment whims of the 
American public. But critics of these 
whims must note that the same public 
that chooses Elvis Preslev s "You 
Ain"t Nothin' But A Houn' Dog," 
also has chosen the combination of 
The Philadelphia Orchestra and the 
i Please turn to pa lie 26 I 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



A 4 YEAR NETWORK 

SUCCESS. ../ypty 

AVAILABLE 



-J\ 



NATIONWIDE 
SYNDICATION! 




m. ^ 



General Mills, Sweets Corp. of 
America, Curtiss Candy, Gold Seal 
Corp., Flav-r-Straws are the top 
advertisers who sponsored these 52 
action-packed half hours on the network 

Stars, Willard Parker and 
Harry Lauter, and their hard riding, 
straight-shooting Texas Rangers can do a 
bang-up selling job for you too. 

Get the facts today 



SPONSOR 



SCREEN W GEMS, 

TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP. 
NEW YORK • OCTROrr . CHICAGO • HOUSTON . HOLLYWOOD • ATLANTA . TORONTO 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



25 




WISE INVESTMENT . . . 

happy songs that customers sing . . . 
musical commercials that guarantee top 
results — created for you by — 




ul^ musical enterprises, inc. 



59 EAST 54 STREET 
NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 
MURRAY HILL 8-3950 



^U 




WBNS Radio 

Columbus, Ohio 

John Blair & Co., Representatives 




Pulse asked, "What station do you tune 
to first for news?" 37.4% replied, 
WBNS Radio." This is 21% higher than 
the second choice station in Columbus. 



49TH & MADISON 

{Continued from page 24) 

Mormon Tabernacle Choir with "The 
Battle Hymn of the Republic." 
John Barrett 
prog, dir., WKBW 
Buffalo 
* « ♦ 

I read with interest your column, 
"Hitch Your Wagon To A Pop Star" 
(Sponsor Backstage) in the 5 Septem- 
ber issue of SPONSOR. 

I found it to be one of the most 
objective columns covering "today's 
popular music." On a recent sales 
swing across the country, I found 
many agencies anxious to discuss the 
music played by radio stations today. 

I am sure that all look forward, as 
I do, to more of your columns 
covering the subject in depth. 

Milton H. Klein 
gen. mgr., KEWB 
Oakland, Calif. 

Radio beats all! 

Your continuing series on radio 
("Blue Ribbon Radio," SPONSOR, 1 
August-5 Sept.) should stir into ac- 
tion the advertisers who for some rea- 
son or other have passed up this pri- 
mary sales opportunity. It is astound- 
ing to find radio criticized for lack of 
research, an inferior audience, an air 
of confusion, etc., while print media 
shed little if any light on their effec- 
tiveness in reaching the public other 
than to cite gross circulation. Noth- 
ing surpasses radio's gross circula- 
tion, of course. While we do not 
know fully how people are motivated 
by exposure to commercials in any 
medium, one thing is sure: When an 
advertiser wants to know the size of 
his audience, its distribution gee 
graphically or economically, radio 
can and will provide that data. In 
many instances this information is 
already available. 

Let's take the emotion out of ap- 
praising radio. The facts are avail- 
able. I am glad that SPONSOR is 
bringing them to the fore. The proof 
of the pudding is at the local level 
where advertisers less-skilled in the 
application of the advertising art have 
used radio (many times exclusively) 
for only one reason. It got results 
easily measured at the cash register. 
Frank G. Boehm 
v.p., dir. of research 
Adam Young 
N.Y.C. 



26 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



^aUp^vM QUAKER OATS COMPANY 

\H 24 WESTERN MARKETS! 




JAMES MASON in 

"A Sivord for Marius" 



C^ 



Jl^ 



^ 




THIS YEARS "EMMY" WINNER FOR 

''BEST DRAMATIC SERIES'' 

(LESS THAN ONE HOUR) 

Quaker Oats, Commonwealth Edison of Chicago and many other 
top advertisers and TV stations were quick to sign up for this out- 
standing series. More are joining the fast growing list every day ! 

As the "Alcoa-Goodyear Theatre" on the N.B.C. network this star- 
studded series garnered 7 Emmy nominations and 3 Emmy 
awards. If you are looking for a winner, look no further. . . this is it ! 



KIM HUNTER in 

"The Dark File" 



FOR DETAILS. CONTACT 




INC. 



KEENAN WYNN in 

"Afternoon ojf the Beast" 



SCREEN m GEMS, 



TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP. 
NEW YORK • DETROIT • CHICAGO • HOUSTON • HOLLYWOOD • ATLANTA . TORONTO 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



27 



Ot|AtCAA i 

%ck\fik 

OLD 

KEW 
OHLEANS 
FAVORITE 




As served in the 1840 Room at Antoine's by John Ketry 



WWL'TV,„new NEW ORLEANS FAVORITE 



Things are changing fast in the three- 
station New Orleans market. WWL-TV 


now leads in practically all 
periods . . . 


important time 


Sunday thru Saturday 

WWL-TV 


Sta. B 


Sta. C 


% 
August ARB 


% 


% 


6-10 p.m. 40.4 
10-midnight 49.1 


40.1 
40.6 


18.9 
10.7 


August Nielsen 






6-9 p.m. 42.0 
9-midnight 50.0 


39.0 
37.0 


17.0 
11.0 



And WWL-TV personnel lead in experience 
— competitive experience gained in TV 
markets coast-to-coast. 

Represented nationally 
by the Katz Agency 

WWL-TV 



NEW ORLEANS 




M. 



K 



Here's how to make it: 



xm- 



The originol recipe is a closely guarded 
secret of Anfoine's, but here's one that 
gives fine results. Serves 4. 
Melt 4 tbsp. butter In saucepan and 
add 4 tbsp. minced row spinach, 2 tbsp. 
each of onion, parsley, celery— all chopped 
fine — 3 tbsp. breed crumbs, 1 dash Tabasco, 
1/3 tsp. any absinthe substitute, salt to 



taste. Cook 15 minutes; stir constantly. 
Press through sieve and set aside. Fill 4 
pie pons with rock salt and place on top 
of each 6 freshly opened oysters on half- 
shell. (Total 24 oysters.) Spoon sauce on 
each oyster; place under broiler until sauce 
begins to brown. Serve with bottle of very 
cold Choblis wine. 



c?5!4»ttS»>?»!>>5J*5W^ 



28 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



AUTOS AT 
THE CROSSROADS- 
PART TWO 




CHEVY 
FACES A 



CRUCIAL COUNT-DOWN 



"ZERO" — Final count-down preliminary to I960 models Chevrolet ad campaign was this 
client-agency ad committee meeting last Tuesday. In foreground (I to r) James S. Clark, asst. 
ad manager, W. C. "Bill" Power, ad manager, K. E. Staley, gen. sales manager for Chevrolet 



SPONSOR GETS EXCLUSIVE, BEHIND-THE-SCENES INTERVIEW 
ON WHAT HAPPENS WHEN DETROIT MAKES A BOLD DECISION 



DETROIT, MICH. (23 September) 

When you read this, Corvair by Chevrolet — the 
revolutionary entry in the U. S. compact car field, 
will have just gone on display in dealer showrooms. 
It marks the beginning of a new era for automotives. 
It is the end of a story that began nine years ago, a 
story as "cloak-and-dagger" as a Hitchcock thriller. 
Principals are the Chevrolet Division of CM and 
its advertising agency, Campbell-Ewald Co., who 



have worked together since 1922 to make Chevy the 
top-selling car in America. 

SPONSOR came to Detroit to get the story first- 
hand, stayed on to watch the tense drama of tlie 
final count-down in the launching of a brand new 
car and its air advertising. The picture above 
marked the "fire" count for the announceiiient ad 
campaign. It is the final meeting of the advertising 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



29 




THIS IS IT! With Corvair (I to r) W. G. Power, Chevrolet ad manager; Colin Campbell, executive v.p. and Chevy account exec at Campbell- 
Ewald; K. E. "Gene" Staley, Chevy sales manager; Henry G. Little, chairman of the board at C-E. Corvair Is the revolutionary car in I960 



committee composed of 12 Chevrolet 
admen and a like number from Camp- 
bell-Ewald. It took place yesterday 
morning in the GM building, where 
the agency is headquartered along 
with its client. The picture, taken ex- 
clusively for SPONSOR, was snapped 
just after the committee has screened 
and approved the tv commercials that 
announce the new cars. It is the first 
time that anyone around here can 
recall an ad committee meeting being 
interrupted for pictures. 

"The committee, where every 
Chevrolet member has his counter- 
part from the agency, is unique in 
automotive advertising," says W. G. 
(Bill) Power, Chevrolet ad manager. 
"It was set up back in the early 
thirties, and has worked well." 

"The relationship between Chev- 
rolet and ourselves," says Colin 
Campbell, C-E executive vice presi- 
dent and Chevrolet account super- 
visor, "is the closest thing to a part- 
nership that I ever saw." 

In their 37 years together, never 



have the partners had a more excit- 
ing year than this. First, Chevrolet 
has a brand new story to tell about 
improvements on the 16 models that 
comprise its Impala-Bel Air-Biscayne 
car line and station wagons. Trans- 
mission tunnels in these have been 
shaved down about 25%, making for 
roomier interiors; rear ends have un- 
dergone re-styling. Second, Chevrolet 
trucks (this year there are 164 differ, 
ent models, up from 139 last year) 
have a startling sales message — for 
the first time torsion-spring suspen- 
sion has been introduced into trucks 
for shockproof rides. 

To cap it all, there's the Corvair. 
Of the Big Three's entry into the 
compact, economy cars this year, Cor- 
vair is the revolutionary. A rear en- 
gine car ( Ford's Falcon and Chrys- 
ler's Valiant are both traditional front 
engines) ; air-cooled (the first U. S. 
air-cooled engine since Franklin in 
the 1920s) ; a horizontal aircraft 
type engine, and independent suspen- 
sion on all four wheels. 



Nine years ago, Chevrolet engineers 
began developing this car for the 
U.S. market. A smoke-screen, laid to 
throw off competitors, was to name it 
Holden 25 (Holden is GM in Aus- 
tralia) and to ask for bids on machin- 
ery "FOB San Francisco," although 
the purchases actually wound up at 
Chevrolet in Detroit. If word of the 
car had leaked, it would still have 
been assumed to be for the Australian 
market. 

Campbell-Ewald came into the pic- 
ture about three years ago. By then 
Chevrolet engineers had decided the 
experimental Holden 25 might well 
be the U. S. compact car. In cooper- 
ation with Chevrolet's research arm, 
the C-E market research department 
set out to sample the tastes of a de- 
manding and sometimes fickle U. S. 
public. 

"We didn't know what we'd find 
out," one member of the C-E research 
team recalls, "and, what's more, we 
didn't know what we wanted to find 
out. The idea of Chevrolet bringing 



30 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 





WRAPS OFF! These pictures ap- 
pear for the first time in any mag- 
azine. They were taken by Willard 
Hanes, of Campbell-Ewald Holly- 
wood office, during filming of 
Chevrolet and Corvair tv commer- 
cials at Warner Bros, this summer, 
but were never developed until 
now for security reasons. "There 
has never been a security leak on 
new cars through production of tv 
commercials at Chevrolet," says 
Phil McHugh, who, as C-E vice 
president of radio/tv, is respon- 
sible for all Chevy air activity 




out a compact car was still pretty con- 
troversial." 

It might be noted that research of 
one kind or another is a continuing 
thing around Chevrolet and C-E. The 
day before shooting of new tv com- 
mercials this summer, scripts and 
storyboards were revised according 
to a last minute motivational research 
report. Post-testing of every tv show 
and commercial influences new offer- 
ings. 

The preliminary market research 
satisfied both client and agency that 
the compact, economy car was in de- 
mand. If they needed any further 
convincing they had only to view the 
climbing sales of the small foreign 
car companies (which bv now, along 
with American's Rambler and Stude- 
baker-Packard's Lark, control about 
15% of the U.S. car market). 

Prototype of the Holden 25 was 
first seen by the agency in May 1958 
called Del Ray until the name Corvair 
was finally decided upon. 

Now for C-E and the Chevrolet ad- 



vertising department, began the Her- 
culean task of preparing the product 
for market under the tightest secur- 
ity. Only international politics and 
military developments surpass the 
automotive industry in espionage and 
counter-espionage. Any leak can be 
costly — if not fatal. 

In its tour of Campbell-Ewald and 
the Chevrolet Division, sponsor saw 
plenty of evidence of this fanatic dedi- 
cation to secrecy : Media charts and 
story boards but under lock and key 
every night. In agency corridors, 
locked doors marked "Security Area." 
Only a handful of typists who have 
been "cleared," permitted to type 
radio and tv commercial scripts. In 
GM Photo Center, an entire sealed- 
off area where "classified" photo- 
graphs are developed and printed. 

The production stills, shown on 
this page, taken during the filming 
of Chevrolet and Corvair commer- 
cials at Warner Bros, were never even 
developed, for security reasons, until 
today when sponsor asked for them. 



Why all this cloak-and-dagger 
secrecy ? 

"Your readers in the advertising 
business will understand it best by 
this simile," said Phil L. McHugh, 
C-E. vice president in charge of 
radio/tv. "Just suppose the big soap 
companies all changed their products 
in the same week every year! 

"The auto industry has had its 
leaks." McHugh went on, "but this I 
can say : Here, we"\ e never had a 
leak through the production of a tv 
commercial. That's a tribute to the 
tv film commercial studios." It also 
is a tribute to Chevy and C-E whose 
own precautions will be detailed later. 

As "Operation Del Ray" went into 
effect last year, C-E began buzzing 
(it hasn't stopped buzzing yet). 

Campbell-Ewald has a total per- 
sonnel of about 700 employees. Tlie 
majority of them are in headquarters 
in the GM building in DeirML. The 
rest are spread across the country in 
11 branches: New York City, San 
Francisco, Los Angeli-s, Chicago, 



sponsor 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



31 



Washington, Atlanta, Cincinnati, Dal- 
las, Kansas City, Denver, and Holly- 
wood. (Tile latter is strictly a tv 
unit) . New York, San Francisco, Los 
Angeles and Chicago have copy and 
media staffs Avhich handle local ac- 
counts. Every branch has a Chevro- 
let account man, for the whole or- 
ganization follows the regional pat- 
tern of Chevrolet distribution. Each 
location (except Hollywood and Los 
Angeles), where C-E has a branch is 
also the center of a Chevrolet region 
(these regions include 47 zones, over 
7,200 dealers and some 25,000 Chev- 
rolet salesmen) . 

When the word came that Chev- 



rolet had decided to enter Corvair in 
the 1960 auto race, C-E increased its 
staff, set up special teams to cover the 
expanding Chevy line. This year, ac- 
cording to Campbell, about 225 of the 
total agency personnel worked exclu- 
sively on Chevrolet, and about 275 
worked on the Chevrolet account 
75 /c of their time. 

Budgets were set up by the Adver- 
tising Committee. Contrary to the 
belief of many in broadcasting, car 
advertising budgets are not the prod- 
uct of hindsight. Chevrolet's 1960 
budget, for example, is based not on 
last year's sales but on a carefully 
worked-out estimate of the 1960 car 




MEDIA-ANALYSTS: (I to r) Rick Bent, outdoor; Robert D. Schiller, media analyst; Carl 
Georgi, v.p.-media director; Jerry Moynihan, asst. media director; Robert Crooker, radio/tv 
buyer; G. E. Eagan, print. "Broadcasters," says Carl Georgi, "should make pitches early." 




AERONAUTS: The radio/tv group of C-E meet (you'll see commercial on 4 Oct. Dinah Shore 
Show): Robert McTyre, (standing) group copy supervisor; (I to r): Ken Jones, v.p.-creative 
director; John Coleman, assistant; Phil L. McHugh, v.p.-radio/tv; James Beavers, asst. a/e 



market. The Chevrolet ad budget in- ! 
eludes Chevy cars and station wagons, j 
Chevrolet trucks, sports car Corvette 
and now — the new Corvair. Since 
it is estimated that one Corvair will 
be sold for every five Chevrolets in 
1960, the proportions of commercials 
for Corvair can be expected to get 
about this share of the play. 

During May and June of this year, 
the C-E media department gave seri- 
ous thought to station and network 
buvs. On the basis of past success, 
Dinah Shore (NBC TV) and Pat 
Boone (ABC TV) were musts again. 
For added impact in this crucial auto- 
motive year, a Red Skelton Special 
was added on CBS TV. 

Radio buying took place in August. 
Over 2,000 radio stations will be 
beaming approximately 75,000 an- 
nouncement commercials. "Never has 
Chevrolet had as much radio support 
during an introduction period," K. E. 
"Gene" Staley, general sales manager 
for Chevrolet, told SPONSOR. This is 
saying something indeed, for Chevro- 
let has always been a champion of 
radio. (The greatest spot radio cam- 
paign of all time was the Chevrolet 
Musical Moments campaign of the 
early '30's, instigator of which was 
C-E's Joe Neebe, now on the staff of 
sponsor) . 

This year Chevy has, in radio, a 
big spot flight, Mutual and CBS news- 
casts, plus more than 1,000 stations of 
Keystone Network. "Even so," says 
Carl Georgi, Jr., v.p. and director of 
media at C-E, "we're getting calls 
from a few stations now wondering 
why they also weren't bought. Reps 
and stations," says Georgi, "should 
start much earlier in the year making 
pitches. We're always available to 
hear a sales story from a station, but 
were more available early in the 
game. When our plans are firmed, 
and we're in the process of making 
buys (as they were by mid-summer 
this year) we have less time to listen." 

NOTE: For a fleeting moment, 
SPONSOR glimpsed spot radio media 
charts blocked out through next sum- 
mer. But it also learned that talks are 
already in progress for the 1961 car 
line. 

Out to Chevrolet dealers have gone 
{Please turn to page 52) 



32 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 " 



HERE'S WHAT'S SHOWN IN TvB'S NEW VIEWING SURVEY 





00 

5 


Men 
Women 
Teens 
Children 


Mon.-Fri. 
Saturday 


Sunday 
Sat. & Sun. 


CO 


ISETWORK 


Audience by 1/^ hour periods 


y 


v/ 


y 


y 


J 


y 


y 


y 




v/ 


TIME 


Cumulative audience 


v/ 


V 


^/ 


• 


s/ 


y 


• 


y 




\/ 


NETWORK PROGRAM TYPES 


yy 


• 


V 


x/ 


V 










v/ 


LOCAL 


Audience by 14 hour periods 


\/ 


V 


V 


• 


/ 


y 


/ 


y 




v" 


TIME 


Cumulative audience 


I/' 


• 


y 


/ 


V* 


y 


y 


v/ 




V^ 


LOCAL PROGRAM TYPES 


v^ 


• 


• 


>/ 


y 


y 






V' 


V 



New storehouse of tv information 



^ TvB's most recent study is probably the most com- 
prehensive ever made of U. S. television audiences 

^ Emphasis is on people, rather than homes. Survey 
goes into local, as well as network, program analysis 



\^ne of the most comprehensive 
studies of tv viewing ever published 
has just been released by the Tele- 
vision Bureau of Advertising. 

The result of a year of intensive 
work and planning, tabulating and 
cross-tabulating, the study is a veri- 
table computer-size storehouse of in- 
formation about the U.S. tv audience, 
much of which has never been pub- 
lished before. 

It's the kind of study that doesn't 
set out to prove anything but actually 
ends up by disclosing all kinds of fas- 
cinating facts that could well trigger 



some switches in media strategy. 

Though the study doesn't sell any- 
thing except the value of facts, it was 
designed with a point of view, name- 
ly, that the most important measure 
of the tv audience is people, rather 
than homes. 

At first glance, the variety of data 
are numbing. The study breaks down 
the audience into four population 
segments — men, women, teenagers 
and children — then goes on to show 
each segment in the process of watch- 
ing tv (1) by half hours, (2) by 
cumulative audience, (3) bv network 



time, (4) by local time, (5) by type 
of network show — both daytime and 
nighttime, (6) by type of local show 
— in five day-parts, I 7) by weekdays, 
(8) by weekends, (9) by Saturday 
and Sunday individually, (10) by all 
seven days of the week. 

The study breaks out of the iron- 
clad stricture that tv viewing be 
shown only as a percent of tv homes. 
Now that nearly nine out of 10 U.S. 
homes have tv, TvB took the position 
that it was logical to use U.S. totals 
for each population segment as a 
base. (A summary version of this 
approach can be found in sponsor's 
1959-60 Air Media Basics, pages 98 
and 100.) In other words, instead of 
showing that, for example, men con- 
stitute 25% of the audience to a show 
type or time period. TvB tallied the 
actual number of men involved and 
calculated the share of all U.S. men 
who were viewing the particular 
program time period concerned. 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



33 



This is all done in a basically sim- 
ple way so that buyers don't have to 
scrounge around trying to figure out 
what it all means. It will probably 
take a little time, however, for users 
to familiarize themselves with the 
format. The many tables are ar- 



from the Nielsen national Audimeter 
sample and its matched diary-Rec- 
ordimeter sample for audience com- 
position. All material on local pro- 
graming comes from Pulse data in 56 
representative metro markets cover- 
ing nearly half of all tv homes. The 



HOW TvB SHOWS VIEWING DATA 



Local time 


No. of women 


% all U.S. women 


% of viewers 


7:00-7:30 A.M. 


1,869 


3.3 


37.0 


7:30-8:00 


3,094 


5.5 


35.0 


8:00-8:30 


3,552 


6.3 


33.0 


8:30-9:00 


3,877 


6.9 


38.0 


9:00-9:30 


4,385 


7.8 


41.0 


9:30-10:00 


5,366 


9.5 


47.0 


16:00-10:30 


6,255 


11.1 


51.0 


10:30-11:00 


7,507 


13.4 


55.0 


11:00-11:30 


8,317 


14.8 


55.0 


11:30-12:00 NOON 


8,567 


15.2 


53.0 


12 N-12:30 P.M. 


8,513 


15.1 


46.0 


12:30-1:00 


9,508 


16.9 


52.0 


1:00-1:30 


8,174 


14.5 


56.0 


1:30-2:00 


8,352 


14.9 


57.0 


2:00-2:30 


7,464 


13.3 


57.0 


2:30-3:00 


8,133 


14.5 


57.0 


3:00-3:30 


8,662 


15.4 


53.0 


3:30-4:00 


9,262 


16.5 


48.0 


4:00-4:30 


9,007 


16.0 


38.0 


4:30-5:00 


9,407 


16.7 


35.0 


5:00-5:30 


8,492 


15.1 


27.0 


5:30-6:00 


9,895 


17.6 


26.0 


6:00-6:30 


15,266 


27.2 


31.0 


6:30-7:00 


18,961 


33.7 


32.0 


7:00-7:30 


22,548 


40.1 


33.2 


7:30-8:00 


25,911 


46.1 


34.2 


8:00-8:30 


28,541 


50.8 


36.9 


8:30-9:00 


28,445 


50.6 


37.8 


9:00-9:30 


28,704 


51.1 


41.9 


9:30-10:00 


26,911 


47.9 


44.4 


10:00-10:30 


21,516 


38.3 


46.1 


10:30-11:00 


16,305 


29.0 


46.9 


11:00-11:30 


11,014 


19.6 


48.4 



11:30-12:00 MID. 



7,665 



13.6 



48.9 



Note: Daily average viewing data cover Monday-through-PVlday daytime, Sunday through Saturday 
evening. No. of women in thousands. Kgures above are not shown in complete format 
used by TvB. Format also Includes separate daytime Saturday and Sunday viewing figures. 



ranged for easy reference and com- 
parison, and a master table shows 
graphically at a glance what each 
individual table covers and how one 
complements the other. 

Source of the information is Niel- 
sen and Pulse. All time period view- 
ing data and all network figures come 



Nielsen material is as of March-April 
1958; the Pulse is March 1958. 
Though the audience numbers may 
be a little higher now, the percentage 
figures paint a situation that will 
probably remain stable for years. 
In addition to about 50 solid pages 
of charts, a good-sized summary sec- 



tion provides some interesting over- 
all views of the television audience 
developed from the basic charts. Here 
are some of them: 

• On an average day tv reaches 
(1) 82.7% of all people, (2) 69.9% 
of all men, (3) 78.4% of all women, 
(4) 88.6% of all teens, (5) 99.9% 
of all children (under four). 

• Of all people in the country, 
24.1% view by noon on the average 
day, 49.7% view by 6 p.m., 82.7% 
by midnight. There are similar 
breakdowns for each of the four 
population segments. 

• Of the 36 half hours between 6 
a.m. and midnight, 29 have more 
adult viewers than non-adult viewers. 

• Of all the people in the country, 
50.5% view daytime tv during an 
average day, 75% view nighttime tv, 
32.2% view only nighttime tv, 7.8% 
view only daytime tv, 42.7% view 
both day and night. There are simi- 
lar breakdowns for each of the four 
population segments here, too. 

The reason for the study was 
spelled out by George Huntington, 
vice president and general manager 
of TvB. 

"TTiere's plenty of material around 
on how homes view tv," he said. "I 
think it's about time we forget about 
homes. Let's look at people. That's 
what the advertiser is really inter- 
ested in." 

There are also other facts ratings 
data don't give, he pointed out. "They 
don't provide figures such as the 
total number of men or women who 
view each day. They don't show how 
many people or what kind of people 
view only in the daytime or view only 
at night." 

Huntington said that while the 
study did not attempt to prove any- 
thing about viewing, the figures 
should establish clearly that women 
and teenagers make up a substantial 
part of the daytime tv audience. 

Some of the material published 
could be calculated with existing 
syndicated material but it would take 
a timebuyer too much time, he said. 
Other data could be developed onlv 
through special tabulations, such as 
Nielsen provided TvB. 

In breaking down total population 
into the four segments, TvB uses the 
breakdowns employed by the rating 
service, which was the source of the 
information. The Nielsen reports de- 



34 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



fine audience composition as follows: 
men — 19 and over; women — 19 and 
over; teenagers — 12 through 18; 
children — four through 11. The Pulse 
material on local programing differs 
as follows: men — 18 and over; 
women — 18 and over; teenagers — 12 
through 17. The Pulse definition of 
children is the same as the Nielsen. 

TvB cautions in its report that data 
on network and local programing 
should not be directly compared. In 
the first place, research techniques of 
Pulse and Nielsen differ. Second, 
Pulse data cover metro areas only, 
while the Nielsen material comes 
from a sample of the entire U.S. 
Third, network programs, particular- 
ly at night, commonly cover the 
highest viewing levels. "This can 
lead network programs to have larger 
audiences than local programs tele- 
cast in non-network periods," the 
report stated. "It should also be 
remembered that many stations offer 
time periods for spots and some for 
programs even during these 'network 
time' periods." 

Because of the Nielsen method in 
using its Audilog (diary), some of 
the cumulative audience figures are 
on the conservative side. This is 
why: Suppose a home listed one man 
as viewing during each of the six 
quarter hours between 6 and 7:30. 
This could conceivably be the same 
man, or it might possibly be two 
men and, theoretically, it could even 
be six different men — though this is 
most unlikely. In cumulating these 
figures, the assumption was made that 
one man did all the viewing. If two 
or more men were listed during a 
particular quarter hour, it was as- 
sumed there were at least two or more 
different viewers. 

On the other hand, there were oc- 
casions in which the same person was 
counted twice in the cume totals. 
This usually takes place where a 
child views in his own home and then, 
later, views at a friend's house. Since 
the Audilog gives the respondent no 
way of differentiating, the cume 
totals include the child twice. 

In collecting data on network pro- 
graming, TvB used the Nielsen classi- 
fications. The data do not include 
unsponsored programs. As for Pulse's 
local program analysis, show types 
are based on SRDS' breakdown in its 
Films for Television. ^ 



TYPICAL TvB CHART HERE SHOWS 
HOW MEN VIEW LOCAL PROGRAMS 

MORNING (weekday) 

% of all % of 
No. of men U.S. men viewers 




ISEWS 


1,224 


2.2 


26.1 


HALF 
HOUR ^ 
SHOWS 


ADVEISTVRE 


345 


0.6 


10.4 


CHILDREN 


423 


0.8 


9.2 


GENERAL DRAMA 


3.51 


0.6 


9.6 


SITUATION COMEDY 


426 


0.8 


10.4 




MISCELLANEOUS 


337 


0.6 


7.7 


AFTERNOON (weekday) \ 




NEWS 


1,401 


2.6 


22.1 


HALF 
HOUR ^ 
SHOWS 


^ ADVENTURE 


420 


0.8 


13.5 


CHILDREN 


1,209 


2.2 


10.0 


GENERAL DRAMA 


459 


0.8 


12.9 


SITUATION COMEDY 


654 


1.2 


11.7 


WESTERN 


280 


0.5 


8.6 


L MISCELLANEOUS 


401 


0.7 


13.8 




FEATURE FILMS 


492 


0.9 


12.3 


WEEKEND (daytime) \ 




NEWS 


1,878 


3.4 


36.7 


HALF 
HOUR ^ 
SHOWS 


" ADVENTURE 


2,142 


3.9 


26.9 


CHILDREN 


909 


1.7 


14.5 


GENERAL DRAMA 


3,435 


6.3 


32.1 


SITUATION COMEDY 


1.878 


3.4 


26.6 


WESTERN 


1,343 


2.5 


21.9 


^ MISCELLANEOUS 


1,195 


2.2 


46.0 




FEATURE FILMS 


2.252 


4.1 


26.6 


EARLY EVENING (Sun.-Sat.) \ 




NEWS 


4.812 


8.8 


39.2 


HALF 
HOUR < 
SHOWS 


ADVENTURE 


5,267 


9.6 


34.8 


CHILDREN 


2,397 


4.4 


20.9 


GENERAL DRAMA 


3,448 


6.3 


34.0 


SITUATION COMEDY 


2,945 


5.4 


29.8 


WESTERN 


5.009 


9.2 


30.3 


. MISCELLANEOUS 


2,719 


5.0 


37.8 




FEATURE FILMS 


2.25 1 


1.1 


34.2 


LATE NIGHT (Sun.-Sat.) \ 




NEWS 


6.067 


11.1 


1().6 


HALF 
HOUR < 
SHOWS 


" ADVENTURE 


6,667 


12.2 


41.3 


GENERAL DRAMA 


5,032 


9.2 


42.5 


SITUATION COMEDY 


5,677 


10.4 


44.2 


WESTERN 


6,862 


12.6 


42.2 j 


MISCELLANEOUS 


6,067 


11.1 


45.6 1 




FEATURE FILMS 


4,385 


8.0 


43.8 1 


Note; FUures show dally averaco tlenlng levels for each progrnni type. No. of iiin m ll.ou.t.nils 1 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



35 




WESTINGHOUSE Broadcasting Co. seminar 
finds P. G. Lasky, v.p. KPIX, San Fran.; J. E. 
W. Sterling, pres., Stanford U.; Don Mc- 
Gannon, pres., WBC, at Palo Alto campus 



*We must rediscover 
the individual man' 

^ The individual, not the group, sparks original tv 
and radio ideas, third Westinghouse conclave concludes 

^ 350 broadcasters hear roster of pros outline what 
originality is, why you need it and how you work to get it 



^ SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 

^^eventy-eight giant steps toward 
maturity in public service broadcast- 
ing were taken last week in San Fran- 
cisco as an equal number of speakers 
appeared before some 350 radio and 
tv executives attending the third an- 
nual conference of the Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. 

Speakers and panelists — compris- 
ing some of the most astute, imagina- 
tive and successful broadcast "brains" 
— paced their discussions to the con- 
ference theme of individualism as set 
by WBC President Donald H. Mo- 
Gannon. And, regardless of their 
work-a-day function — as luminaries 
such as Pulitzer prize winning poet 
Archibald MacLeish, or playwright 
Marc Connelly, or semanticist S. I. 
Hayakawa, or as industrious pro- 
gram men from 250 watt stations — 
they pivoted their remarks around 
the same basic points: 

• The goal of all broadcasting — 
public service or commercial — is the 
presentation of fresh ideas in a fresh 
way. 

• Freshness and originality — crea- 
tivity — is the product of an individ- 
ual, not of a committee. 

• The enhancement of the individ- 
ual — of the person who is a listener 
or a viewer, of the person who pro- 
grams for that audience, and of the 
station management which encour- 
ages this programing^comes with a 
nurturing of the creative talent in a 



free and uninhibited atmosphere. 

• Personal freedom inspires feel- 
ing and perception. These emotions, 
in turn, precede thought and action. 

• Feeling and perception are the 
basis of communication in the full- 
est sense of the word. And communi- 
cations experts in the broadcast field 
should foster — in the words of Mr. 
Hayakawa, a luncheon speaker at the 
Stanford U. seminar series — empathy 
rather than sympathy or "a feeling 
with the listener rather than merely a 
feeling for." 

In his opinion (and all of the 
speakers were explicit in their agree- 
ment on the same point), "the vac- 
uum tube is the greatest boost to com- 
munication since the invention of 
printing and movable type." 

The power of radio and tv to com- 
municate forcefully and meaningfully 
today, as it is — and tomorrow, as it 
can be — was stressed by every pan- 
elist at the three-day seminar on the 
Stanford campus in Palo Alto, 21-23 
Sept. Despite the academic environs 
and subjects for discussion, speakers 
from all parts of the country, repre- 
sentative of all professional phases of 
broadcasting, took a practical view in 
centering their arguments and con- 
tentions on one basic theme: the in- 
dividual as the fount of creativity. 

They discussed news as the pri- 
mary format of programing wearing 
the guise of public service. But they 
introduced also subjects of religion. 



documentaries, politics, editorializing 
and cooperation with established civic 
and governmental agencies. 

Most of them agreed that public 
service programs need not bear the 
stigma of public do-goodism. In their 
opinion, so-called public service pro- 
grams can be exciting, imaginative — 
and sponsored. 

Robert Foreman, executive v.p. in 
charge of creative services at BBDO, 
New York, while speaking with the 
so-termed "glamour panel" (which 
included Dr. Frank Baxter of the 
U. of Southern California; Fred 
Friendly, executive producer at CBS 
and playwright Connelly) : "Any- 
thing worthwhile can be sold. If the 
program idea can be confined to 
audience need then it becomes some- 
thing salable and becomes of value 
to the ad agency." 

Lofty conference observers termed 
public service broadcasters a "con- 
science" for the radio/tv industry. 
But pragmatists in the group — and 
there were many — said that programs 
which take the needs and hopes of the 
public into consideration — in terms 
of the market and the people to whom 
the station operates — have far more 
doUar-and-sense advantages than those 
programs which do not. 

Public service programs, they 
agreed, have these pluses for station 
management: 

• They build prestige which, in 
turn, builds audience, audience loyal- 



36 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



tv anrl attentiveness to the ])rogram 
which Station X is carrying. 

• This forces advertisers to pay 
rapt attention to community service 
shows and to sponsor them. 

• The influx of advertising monies 
enables a station staff to work more 
broadly and more flexibly in terms 
of coverage and production. 

But, most public service experts 
warned, originality and creativity 
start with ideas rather than witli 



mone) . And ideas originate with an 
individual, not with a group. Such 
mechanical assists as cameras, props, 
costumes, guest fees and field trips 
merely serve to supplement and im- 
plement a basic idea. If the idea 
isn't there, they contend, no amount 
of showmanship will promote and 
foster the public service concept. 

Here is a summary of ideas sug- 
gested by speakers and panelists — all 
professionals in their job classifica- 



tions, from news and program direr- 
tor to station managers and network 
executives — as ways in which individ- 
ual creativity can be fostered. 

• Get everyone on the staff en- 
tlmsiastic about his own personal in- 
terests anfl build public service proj- 
ects from these interests. Then you 
have the best idea: that which is 
motivated and fostered by personal 
interest. 

{Please turn to page 46) 






SHOWMANSHIP SPARKLED at WBC sessions, with tv projection of panel and audience at auditorium front. Sonne 80 speakers from both 
commercial, non-commercial jobs told of need for better audience com nunication, more public service shows, improved community identification 



iQ^ 



# 



^ f 




• 333 




a t 






PRODUCT TIE-INS put Knickerbocker in store windows on Fifth Ave. 
(at lett), in meat cabinet with Merkel sausages (top), in a boat 
(above) to merchandise its fishing contest. Brewery plans further tie-in 
activity when I960 tv plans are set, and new agency takes hold 



Why advertisers climb aboard 



^ New York brewery gets added reach for $2 million 
ad budget via joint promotions with other advertisers 

^ Recent tie-in with Merkel Meat Co. brought added 
distribution, new types of outlets, exposure for both 



I 



f your ad budget isn't giving you 
the reach your product needs, take 
a look at what Jacob Ruppert brewery 
has been doing to hypo coverage for 
its Knickerbocker Beer. 

Ruppert spends just over $2 mil- 
lion a year in advertising, split about 
equally between the New York metro- 
politan area and New England. The 
Knickerbocker brand leads the pack 
in New England. But its sales in 
New York have met with fierce com- 
petition. 

After losing nearly a half million 
dollars in 1958, the company upped 
its spot tv expenditures 45%, re- 



turned to its old "Knock Knock for 
Knickerbocker" theme and embarked 
on a series of joint promotions that 
has brought a reciprocal type of "co- 
sponsorship" in the schedules of 
other advertisers. 

"In some cases," says Ruppert ad 
manager Maury Atkinson, "you can 
be in virtually every media at once 
without increasing your own media 
expenditures by one dime." 

Ideally, says Atkinson, you look for 
an advertiser: 

• Who goes after the same audi- 
ence you do — but uses an entirely 
different media lineup 



• Whose product lends itself to a 
logical tie-in, and 

• With strong distribution in the 
same and related type of outlets (for 
doubling up in trade merchandising). 

Knickerbocker found this ideal set 
of conditions in the Merkel Meat Co., 
New York packer of pork products 
whose advertising objectives (reach- 
ing every population segment with a 
quality pitch) were detailed in spon- 
sor last week (26 September). 

Long a spot tv user, Knickerbocker, 
heavied up in the medium when it 
discovered (via a market survey) that 
the beer people are used to seeing is 
the one they ask for. "Each sponsor 
was concentrating in a medium that 
was ideal for his aims," says Atkin- 
son. "We decided to see what would 
happen when we overlapped the other 
fellow's advertising for two weeks 
and, very importantly, tied the joint 
schedules to strong trade merchandis- 
ing and consumer promotion." 



38 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




PLENTY OF HOOPLA characterizes tie-in merchandising, like N.Y. parade which wound up recent all-media promotion with Merltel Meat Co. 



Knickerbocker's tv schedules 



The plan: a four-week "beer and 
knockwurst festival," promoted in 
each sponsor's normal advertising 
schedules, with merchandising to the 
trade, sales force activity tied to in- 
creasing distribution and a parade 
windup in New York's German York- 
ville section. 

Here's how it worked: 

Merkel integrated the promotion 
into its radio, newspaper and car 
card advertising; Knickerbocker into 
its tv and outdoor. 

Merkel scheduled 99 spots per week 
(lO's and 30's) over the four weeks on 
WOR (New York), WHLI (Hemp- 
stead, L.I.), WPAC (Patchogue, 
L.I.), WRIV (Riverhead, L.I.). 
Knickerbocker worked 10 prime time 
l.D.'s per week into its New York 
City tv schedule (156 l.D.'s per week, 
5-11 p.m.) on WABC-TV, WCBS-TV, 
WNEW-TV, WRCA-TV. 

Merkel carried two insertions in 

{Please turn to page 54) 




WATCH OUT FOR THESE 
PITFALLS IN TIE-INS 



MAURICE ATKINSON, Ruppert ad manager, tosses out these 
cautions to advertisers planning related item promotions 



AVOID BRAND SWITCHING. DON'T TALK BARTER. Explain 

Be sure your partner can help carefully to stations that tie-in 

you get displays outside your is not barter, that it can result 

own shelf or department area in greater direct sales for them 



DON'T IGNORE RETAILER GET PARALLEL COVERAGE. 
profits. Pair two related high- Be sure to select a partner whose 
profit items or a high-profit item sales organization parallels and 
with unrelated slow-moving staple covers your own distributing area 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



39 



H* 



JUL 



,^* 



Taystee Bread's new 
Tin Pan Alley sell 

^ American Bakeries launches new radio campaign, 
uses 2V2-minute format for scores of six original songs 

^ Developed by Chicago-based Y&R team, new bread- 
selling technique has replaced all other media buys 



r\ jingle will sell a product. But 
will two and one-half minutes of 
music sell bread? Y&R and its 
clients, American Bakeries, are about 
to find out. 

Just off the pressings are six origi- 
nal songs by Karl Vollmer and Tom 
Rogers of the agency's Chicago office. 
They include two ballads, a waltz, one 
jazz, one blues and a Latin-rhythm 
number. And their purpose is to sell 



Taystee Bread via a two-and-one-half- 
minute commercial aimed at the little 
woman who buys the family bread. 
The project began when Y&R de- 
cided something different was needed 
to push up product sales in Taystee's 
28 markets. The six tunes carrying a 
longer, not-quite-hard-sell commercial 
were the results. American liked the 
idea so well that ad manager Bob 
Llewellyn ordered all previously 



planned media (two-thirds tv, one 
third billboards) scrapped in favo^ 
of the song-commercials. The cor 
pany will throw the whole weight 
its advertising behind the new radii 
campaign. 

With the agency as well as thi 
client sold on the new approach, thfl 
next big question was: Would thf 
stations buy it? 

American made sure their new) 
commercials got a good head start by 
giving them a really professional 
packaging. The titles, including such 
ear-catchers as "Best Food Forward," 
"22 Slices of Bread," and "The No 
Bread Blues," are pressed three to a 
side, enclosed in an album with full- 
color front carrying the practical 
title: "Music To Sell Bread By." The 
reverse side of the album carries the 
usual descriptive song blurbs, plus a 
Taystee logo. Entertainment value of 
the lyrics is, of course, a key selling 
point: They're designed to appeal to 
the stations, store manager, chain 
buyers and grocery trade in general. 
( Please turn to page 46) 



NEW CONCEPT for selling bread, "Music to Sell Bread By," gets test spin by (I to r) Ross Tompkins, Y&R account executive for American; 
Karl Vollmer, v. p. and creative director, Y&R; Bob Llewellyn, American ad manager. Chicago-based team scored six original Tin Pan Alley tunes 



P 





NL&B SHOWS 
BIG BILLING 
JUMPS IN 35- 
YEAR HISTORY 



1.5 1-9 




1925 '30 '35 '40 '45 '50 '55 '56 '58 



MAURICE H. NEEDHAM, Chicago ad veteran, heads agency whose dramatic rise in billings has paralleled expansion of air media. Last year, 
approximately 49% of Needham, Louis & Brorby billings were in radio and tv. Latest estimates show this figure will increase five to 10"% '" '959 



NL&B's new 3 -way radio/ tv setup 



^ Expanding Chicago agency divides its radio/tv de- 
partment, puts emphasis on program specialization 

^ Time, programs, commercials get equal stature 
in organization alignment that may mark new trend 



— CHICAGO, ILL. 

A% significant realignment in the 
organization setup at Needham. Louis 
& Brorby is causing industry observ- 
ers here to wonder whether it heralds 
a new trend in radio/tv handling by 
ad agencies. 

Early in August, NL&B split its 
radio/tv department, which then had 
a combined responsibility for pro- 
grams and commercials, into two dis- 
tinct, autonomous divisions and an- 
nounced its conviction that in the fu- 



ture, agencies must lay much more 
stress on "program involvement" than 
has been the case at most shops in 
the past five years. 

The departmental division gives 
NL&B, in effect, a three-way radio/tv 
setup with separate departments han- 
dling the air media functions of 
timebuying, programing and com- 
mercials. 

Most large agencies today operate 
on a two-department system with 



timebuying and programing, or pro- 
graming and commercials under the 
same roof. 

The reason for the NL&B switch to 
greater emphasis on programing was 
explained to SPONSOR by James G. 
Cominos, v.p. in charge of the new 
program division. 

Says Cominos, "Program buying 
today has evolved into a year-round 
activity. Seasonal peaks are no long- 
er as prominent as they were even 
one year ago. There are just not 
enough shows on the market to satis- 
fy advertisers' requirements. And the 
serious shortage of good producers 
can only add to the dearth of pro- 
grams. 

"There are other reasons, too, why 
we believe agencies must work closer 
with networks on mutual program 
problems. First, the increasingly 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



41 



heavy sums of money necessary for 
program and network buys. Second, 
the trend toward shorter term pro- 
gram contracts. We feel that in order 
to make sure our clients are kept up 
to date on the best new programs 
available, we must place more empha- 
sis on program specialization. 

"This doesn't mean we are going 
into the program business. It does 
mean we are going to work closer 
with networks, program packagers 
and producers." 

Cominos points out that the in- 
creased emphasis on programing will 
be expensive and that it will mean in- 
creases in staff to handle the extra 
heavy work loads on program super- 



vision and new program research. 

Just what this new research will 
mean is spelled out by John Scott 
Keck, Cominos' assistant and v.p. 
director of radio/tv programing. Ac- 
cording to Keck, "We are going to 
concern ourselves continually with 
new entertainment available for tv. 
This includes analysis of film trends 
(both movies and tv), popularity of 
current records, hit acts in night 
clubs, developments in the legitimate 
theater, and the world of fashion. 
We are planning extensive research 
in order to chart the life expectancy 
of shows and rating futures." 

On the commercials side, NL&B's 
new and wholly autonomous creative 




BROADCAST FACILITIES DIVISION of media dept. handles air media timebuying at 
NL&B. At left, Arnold B. Johnson, v.p. in charge of the division, explains correlation of media 
and marketing planning for Massey-Ferguson to a group of top-ranking NL&B executives 





CREATIVE SERVICES DIVISION headed 
by James L Isham, is responsible for all 
NL&B radio and television commercials 



RADIO/TV PROGRAMING DIVISION in 

charge of James G. Cominos, concentrates 
on programing and search for new talent 



division will be headed by James L. 
Isham, v.p. in charge of all broadcast 
commercial copy and art. 

Working closely with these two ra- 
dio/tv divisions is NL&B's broadcast 
facilities division of its media depart- 
ment. Arnold E. Johnson, v.p. and 
broadcast facilities director, explains 
his division's function in this way. 

"Our emphasis is on quality. W| 
seek to maintain conditions whicf 
insure that the quality of our outpi 
matches the quality of our clients 
products. We match our deep con- 
cern for quantitative measures withj 
an equally deep concern for qualita-j 
tive knowledge. 

"We approach each media probJ 
lem as one of matching the producf 
the creative expression of the produc 
message and the medium of reaching 
the properly identified consume 
group. Our buyers are primarily 
concerned with creating an ideal 
blend of the applicable qualities of 
product media, and consumer at 
maximum efficiency. 

"To this end, they are constantly 
urged to increase their knowledge of 
markets and are constantly fed in- 
formation through our account task 
force system, to update their fund of 
marketing data on specific products. 

"They develop their own product 
profiles on each of their accounts and 
use this data to support media pro- 
posals and purchases." 

Of NL&B's over-all media philoso- 
phy, Blair Vedder, v.p. and head of 
the media department says, "Our 
philosophy is simple, but not always 
easy to follow. We believe media 
must be related directly to product 
marketing, and therefore, in addition 
to a great deal of market analysis 
work, we are also concerned with 
consumer behavior." 

Coordinated with NL&B's media, 
programing and commercials divi- 
sions in the radio/tv field, is its 
unique promotion and merchandising 
department headed by Harold A. 
Smith. This unit is charged with re- 
sponsibility for obtaining (when 
sought by clients) the maximum ex- 
ploitation available with the sponsor- 
ship of radio and tv programs. 

Typical of the king-size promotion- 
al activities of Smith's department 
(Please turn to page 54) 



42 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



HOW RADIO 

GIVES ZIP 

TO STOCKS 




MAKE 'EM DRAMATIC. Boet+cher ad mgr. Alan Dugan points out changing figures on 
teleregis+er to reporter Glen Martin, KOA pgm. dir. Jim Atkins (r) prior to airtime 



^ Boettcher & Co. gets flavor, trading fever into its 
5-minute market reports aired four times daily in Denver 

^ Commercials tied to print ads, and heavy promo- 
tion bring big volume of inquiries, business increases 



I wl ulti-million share days in the 
stock market mean one thing: A lot 
of small investors are doing a lot of 
buying and selling. And a lot of 
brokers are reaping a golden harvest. 

Keeping that harvest golden, how- 
ever, requires strong identification as 
a leader in the field. And to get it 
brokers are turning more and more 
to air media, not only in the Financial 
Hub of New York, but in smaller 
financial centers throughout the coun- 
tr\. 

Take, for example, Boettcher & Co. 
of Denver. Three and one half years 
ago they discovered they could reach 
the markets they were after with some 
uell planned radio strategy. The suc- 
11 -s of their format carries with it 
Miine valuable lessons for others in 
the field. 

At the forefront of Boettcher's ra- 
dio activity is a five-minute program 
broadcast four times daily, Monday 



through Friday over KOA, Denver. 
It airs at 9:05 a.m., 1:05 p.m., 5:05 
p.m., 9:05 p.m. The two early shows 
are aired direct from the Boettcher 
boardroom during trading hours, 
picking up the trading activity in the 
background and pepped up with up- 
to-the-minute price changes and mar- 
ket developments as they occur. 

In addition to market quotations, 
news and trends, the program in- 
cludes briefs on the local unlisted 
security markets with selected quota- 
tions. Much of the material is pro- 
vided to KOA via the financial wire. 

The programs are designed to cap- 
ture the interest of even the casual 
listener, and to arouse in him curiosity 
and a compelling interest in the whole 
atmosphere of trading: 

Against the sound of a news ticker 
in the background, Boettcher's finan- 
cial reporter Glen Martin, gives the 
times of the followino; three broad- 



casts followed by this sequence: 

• One-minute market summary 

• 30-second commercial 

• Two minutes of market news 
The closing contains three ele- 
ments: repeat rundown of averages 
and volumes, plug for free mailings, 
reminder of forthcoming programs. 

Commercials do not suffer because 
of brevity according to Boettcher ad 
manager Alan Dugan. The three used 
each week are built around material 
which has already appeared in a two- 
column, 8" coupon advertisement in 
the Sunday edition of the Denver 
Post (contract space on the cover 
page of the financial section). 
Boettcher's agency, Broyles Adver- 
tising in Denver, prepares the ads 
and commercials from material sup- 
|)lied by the brokerage house. 

Aim of Boettcher's commercials are 
inquiries which these cross-reference 
commercials have proved effective in 
bringing in. Giveaways such as in- 
vestment booklets, research reports, 
account servicing data provide added 
incentive. 

As inquiries come in thev arc pro- 
cessed immediately by card record 
system to the sales manager's depart- 
ment. Along with the write-iri niate- 
{Please turn to page 56) 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



43 



GET UNDER 
THE SURFACE . . . 

for market facts in the 
San Antonio area. 

The cost per 1000 is 
lower on KONO radio . . . per 

1000 men ... per 1000 
women . . . per 1000 families. 
For facts and figures 
call your 

KATZ AGENCY 

REPRESENTATIVE 

5000 Watts • 860 KC 



JACK ROTH, Mgr. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



44 



k.' 



I 



i 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



»OT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

National Biscuit Co., New York: Kicking off five-week schedules 
this month in top markets for Dromedary dates. Day minutes are 
being used, frequencies varying. Buyer: John Cantanese. Agency: 
Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

General Foods Corp., White Plains, N. Y.: New schedules start 
this month in about 30 markets for Minute Mashed Potatoes, with 
day and fringe night minutes and chainbreaks for nine weeks. Pete 
Bardach and Jacques Van Sluys Maes buy at Foote, Cone & Belding, 
N. Y. Other activity begins this month for Alpha-Bits cereal, out of 
the Post Div., Battle Creek. Kid show participations run through 
March in about 27 markets. George Heffernan is the buyer at Benton 
& Bowles, New York. 

Lever Bros. Co., New York: Flights start 15 October and run 
through 31 December for its All, using minutes and 20's in about 
20 markets. Buyer: Don DeCarlo. Agency: Needham, Louis & 
Brorby, Inc., Chicago. Also, through SSCB, New York, seven-week 
schedules of day and night minutes get off this month for Silver 
Dust. Buyer: Bill Ferguson. 

Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc., New York: About 50 markets are get- 
ting schedules this month for Pertussin. Flights run from 10 to 12 
weeks; day minutes. Buyer: Jane Podester. Agency: McCann- 
Erickson. New York. 

International Latex Corp., New York: Fringe night minute flights 
begin 19 October, run 52 weeks for Playtex in about 120 markets; 
fringe night and day minutes, about 10 per week per market, start 
early October and November, depending on market, for 13-21 weeks 
in about 110 markets. Charles Theiss buys on Playtex at Ted Bates 
& Co. ; John Curran on Isodine at Reach, McClinton & Co., New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

E. I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co., Delaware: Flights for Zerex 
anti-freeze start this month on a staggered basis in major markets. 
Traffic and day minute placements run for four and five weeks. 
Buyer: Ted Wallower. Agency: BBDO, New York. 

Shulton, Inc., New York: Going into about 80 markets with 20's, 
30's and 60's for Desert Flower men's toiletry; about 30 announce- 
ments per week per station. Four-week lineups start this month. 
Buyer: Joe Knapp. Agency: Wesley Associates, New York. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis: Schedules begin this month and 
run through April for Gold Medal flour. Day minute frequencies 
vary from market to market. Buyer: Bill La Marca. Agency: Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., New York. 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



FHE 
rHE 
FHE 
FHE 
THE 



EAST 
EAST 
EAST 
EAST 
EAST 



iSTMAN 
-STMAN 
fSTMAN 
(STMAN 





MOVIELAB 
MOVIELAB 
MOVIELAB 
MOVIELAB 



00000 



00000 

00000 





INTERNEGATIVE H B B B B 
INTERPOSITIVE ^ ^ 5 5 E 

INTERNEGATIVE 2 2 S S 5 
INTERPOSITIVE J^ .|_1 .|-i . ^ .^ . 

INTERNEGATIVE p (t> ^ .p .p . 
INTERPOSITIVE p p p p p 

INTERNEGATIVE 



OEVELO 
DEVELO 



AN COI-OR 



35MM (5248) COLOR NEGATIVE 
35MM (5253) AND 16MM (7253) INTERMEDIATES 
COLOR PRINTINR 

• 16MM CONTACT AND ADDITIVE COLOR PRINTING 
16MM (7270) FROM 16MM KODACHROMES 

FROM 16MM KODACHROME TO 35MM COLOR 

• KODACHROME ^^^^^ ADDITIVE COLOR PRINTING 

• 35MM COLOR 



|! CAl C/5 C/5 
il P^ J=l^ Plf 
I • ■— • - ■— ■ - ■— I 

• $-■$-■$-■ 

* H-^ ~4^ -§-^ 
t Zn C/i Zn r^nn3 

I Ph Ph Ph 





Kodachromc 
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f^ Write for (kilor Methods Brochure: MOVIELAB COLOR CORPORATION, Movielab BIdg., 619 West 54th St., New York 19, N. Y. 







Perfect Test Market 

Western Montana Offers: 

• 51.00O TV Homes 

• Dru^ Sales Index 167 

• Food Sales Index 145 

• Auto Sales Index 176 
O Retail Sales Index 143 

(Source: NCS #3; Sales Mg+. 1959) 

Perfect Test Station 
KMSO-TV del 



ivers: 



• Captive Audience in 90% of the Area 

• Dominates the 10% Remainder Com- 
pletely 

• Now the Only TV Station on the Air 
in Western Montana 

• Low Cost/1,000 Homes 

(Source: FCC Data; ARB '58-'59) 

KMSO-TV ''T' 

MISSOULA, MONTANA 



• SPRINGFIELD 

• DECATUR 

• CHAMPAIGN-URBANA 

'^7(/Ae^ Mid /Ime/Uca 



rr 



s. 



#59 



METROPOLITAN MARKET 



GRADE 




WESTINGHOUSE 

{Continued from page 37) 

• Rely on the concept of the pro- 
gram rather than technical devices. A 
good tv idea can be conveyed with 
silent film and voice-over, with stills 
interspersed with moving film, with 
on-the-spot recording which gives mo- 
mentum and authenticity. 

• Try to develop new methods of 
presentation rather than copying the 
tried-and-true. In news, for example, 
stress human values as well as the 
facts, and take the time to report a 
story in depth to dredge up angles 
which local papers haven't bothered 
with. 

• In editorializing, delegate the 
choice of editorial position to the 
source of the editorial responsibility 
— station management. Have someone 
in a strong station position do on-the- 
air declarations for the stations and 
thus give identification to listeners 
and viewers with an "I" rather than 
with a "corporate we." 

• Build a station (or a network) 
image of public responsibility and in- 
terest which, in turn, pay off with the 
kind of community acceptance adver- 
tisers and agencies seek. 

The group met from morning 
through late evening for three days 
to meet the challenge tossed by West- 
inghouse President McGannon at the 
opening of the conclave. Attendees 
at that time were charged with ex- 
ploring and developing "new tech- 
niques, newly clarified concepts, new 
inspiration and new challenges." 

WBC met its own challenge to 
creativity in adapting Western and 
Japanese themes — both strong in- 
fluences in the development of the 
Bay area — for the presentations. 
There were cowboy songs and Japa- 
nese music. The vast auditorium was 
bedecked with a cyclorama screen, 
specially designed round table for 
panelists, growing plants, flowers, 
trees, a running fountain and a 
mobile of brightly colored Japanese 
lanterns. Luncheon menus, specially 
designed, extended the Japanese motif 
as did fish kites, birds of paradise, 
parasols and lanterns in the trees of 
the outdoor garden. 

The conference conclusion: public 
service programing is a necessity in 
today's swift-paced world and a vital 
element in the establishment of iden- 
tity with a vast audience for any tv 
and radio station. ^ 



TAYSTEE 

{Continued from page 40) 

"We expected to run into some 
trouble at the station level," said 
Y&R's Ross Tompkins, a.e. for Amer- 
ican Bakeries. "But so far, we've 
been able to clear time in spite of 
the fact that few rate cards provide 
for two-and-one-half minute commer- 
cials." 

"Our principal target is the house- 
wife," he continued, "so we're buy- j 
ing an average of two to three lead- ' 
ing stations in 34 markets for morn- 
ing and noon-time placements. The 
schedule calls for 50 to 80 spots per 
week in each market." ■ 

What about cost? 

"Stations are apparently willing to 
go along with us," says ad manager 
Llewelyn, "and provide charges on 
an individual basis. In the New York 
market, none of the three stations 
charged us more than one and one- 
half times the one-minute rate." 

Y&R v.p. and copy director Karl 
Vollmer sums up the aim of the new 
commercials this way: "Our first re- 
quirement was music on a par with 
today's popular songs. Our next to 
sell bread. We just put the two to- 
gether and we're convinced we'll see 
concrete results." ^ 




WICHITA 



is BIG BUSINESS!... with daily 
retail sales topping $1,000,000. 
Wichita with its diversified 
economy — oil, cattle, agricul- 
ture, aircraft — is the bustling 
hub of the rich Central Kansas 
area, dominated by KTVH. 
To sell this rich Kansas market, 
buy KTVH with its undupli- 
cated CBS-TV coverage. 



VISION ASSOCIATES, INC. 



f \ 

I BLAIR TEK 

Hi "WA »«■ mm wm Hi 

^ STUDIOS IN HUTCHINSON AND WICHITA ^ 



46 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



habit... 




walchingr ^^A^ J-TY i^ Fresno 

(California) 



And TV viewers in the Fresno 
area make the KMJ-TV news 
programs a special habit — the 
two highest rated news shows 
in the area are on KMJ-TV*. 

KMJ-TV covers the local 
scene with camera and photo 
processing equipment unequal- 
led in the area. KMJ-TV also 



coordinates with McClatchy 
newspapers to insure thorough 
reporting. KMJ-TV news shows 
— morning, noon, afternoon and 
evening — provide up-to-the- 
minute coverage that viewers 
appreciate. 

•ARB 
Metropolitan Area' Study 
April n - May 14 



THE KATZ AGENCY, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




KMJ-TV . . . 

first station in 

The Billion-Dollar 

Valley of the Bees 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



47 



F 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaignt 



FURNITURE 

SPONSOR: Wananiaker & Son AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: In an area saturated with some 48 
furniture stores, a boost in sales of 35% in just four short 
weeks is an outstanding success. This is Wanamaker's story 
after trying television. The store purchased a 15-minute 
show for 26-weeks on WKTV, Utica-Rome, N. Y. The show 
"brought amazing results almost immediately," according 
to Bob Wanamaker, owner of the established firm of Wana- 
maker & Son. "We were reaching them all — from profes- 
sional man to laborer," reported the furniture dealer. 
"People came from Schenectady, Syracuse and places we 
never heard of before. What's more, they were all pre-sold 
customers." Wanamaker, who is currently planning his fall 
advertising campaign with the help of the WKTV sales de- 
partment, insists that television's advantage of bringing 
wares right into the home is the "best thing that ever hap- 
pened to us. I feel that without television you are just another 
store. Tv, however, adds to your prestige and integrity." 
WKTV, Utica-Rome Programs 

LINGERIE 

SPONSOR: Peter Pan Foundations AGENCY: Ben Sackheim 

Capsule case history: Peter Pan bought an 80-spot sched- 
ule in WOR-TV's Million Dollar Movie — eight a week for 
10 weeks. The segment is shown 16 times a week so that 
the commercials were only in half of each week's runs. 
Women's awareness of Peter Pan was checked by the ac- 
count a week before the campaign began and again after it 
had been running for four weeks. The checks disclosed a 
considerable recognition of Peter Pan products before the 
campaign began, making it much more difficult to register 
again in awareness. However, in terms of brand identifica- 
tion, specific knowledge of the product, recent information 
about product superiority and attribution to tv as the source 
for that recent information, there were conclusive increases 
after only 32 spots. Said a Peter Pan exec, "This documents 
the effectiveness of movie vehicles and contradicts any sug- 
gestions that people don't watch those intrusive interruptions 
between segments of movies. The impact here is tremendous." 
WOR-TV, New York Announcements 



FUEL 

SPONSOR: The Boyle Fuel Co. AGENCY: Direc" 

Capsule case history: It may seem strange that a kid's 
show is able to sell home fuel oil, but The Boyle Fuel Co. of 
Spokane, the largest fuel dealer in this area, has been suc- 
cessfully using Starlite Stairway for seven years on KXLY- 
TV to advertise. "I love kids, and I think that the reason 
for my success is based on the fact that the parents know 
this," stated Leon J. Boyle, president and mgr. Starlite Stair- 
way is a live kids' variety show and all entertainment is sup- 
plied by local and area talent. Boyle, himself, handles all 
producing and interviewing chores for each show, scheduled 
Saturdays from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Not only has Boyle 
been tremendously successful, but the show repeatedly gets 
24 and 25 ARB's. Boyle attributes his success entirely to his 
KXLY-TV show, for which he expends approximately $12,000 
a year. "Our customer gain over the past seven years has 
been phenomenal, and volume has risen sharply," stated 
Boyle. "Television is great and especially KXLY-TV." 
KXLY-TV, Spokane Program 

SPORTS 

SPONSOR: Kelley's, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Kelley's, Inc., a two-chain bowling 
alley concern of Omaha, Nebraska, recently purchased a 
campaign on KETV, Omaha, to increase the number of 
bowlers using Kelley's Hilltop Lanes and North Bowl Lanes, 
and to identify the- two Kelley locations. Their advertising 
campaign consisted of five 70-minute live telecasts direct 
from the Hilltop Lanes. The bowling shows, scheduled 
Mondays, 9:35 to 10:45 p.m., were new to Omaha (the 
games were not regular bowling but headpin bowling, 
which requires the bowler to hit the headpin in order to 
score). The results were quickly felt by Kelley's. An imme- 
diate 20% increase in bowling business, cocktail lounge and 
snack bar sales, as well as a 20% increase in patrons was reg- 
istered by the bowling outfit. There were 170 new patrons 
each Sunday during the show period, and approximately 100 
new customers have continued to bowl Sundays since the 
campaign has ended. "I'm extremely happy with the results 
our tv campaign has brought," said Vince Kelley, Jr, 
KETV, Omaha Program 



48 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 19.59 



,nff after store hours WCAU-TV's "Late Late Show" continues to do business for Philadelphia advertisers. 
Each week the "Late Late Show" is seen by over 392,800 different Philadelphia-area families who stay up 



enjoy top motion pictures from WCAU-TV's library of the finest Hollywood hits 



That's better than 667,800 unduplicated potential customers per week! And at an unduphcated cost-per- 
housand of only $1.05 when you use the economical "Late Late Show" 7-PUin. „ ^ . , •, 

Open for more business in Philadelphia? Show your product on Channel lO's "Lai^LateShcrw. For detaUs^ 
lall your CBS Television Spot Sales representative or . . . CBS Owned Channel 10, Philadelphia WCAU-TV 



ARM, Jan.- July 1959 



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OPEN FOR 
BUSINESS 









With specs monopolizing tv this year, SPONSOR ASKS: 



Which has better S. I. — specials oi 




As the giant one-shot format 
takes hold in television, agency 
and research men discuss the 
sponsor identification value of 
regular shows vs. that of specials 

George Polk, I'-P-, radio/tv programing 
& planning, BBDO, New York 
This question really has no defi- 
nite answer. While the sponsor iden- 
tification of DuPont on the Show of 
The Month or Hallmark on the Hall 



It can be 
accomplished 
very well by 
either type 



of Fame is probably far superior to 
that of the sponsors participating in 
the hour-long weekly shows like 
Perry Mason, Five Fingers and Chey- 
enne, etc., very few specials adver- 
tisers can claim better sponsor iden- 
tification than G.E. on the G.E. 
Theater, U. S. Steel on the U. S. Steel 
Hour, Armstrong on the Armstrong 
Circle Theater and Chevrolet with the 
Dinah Shore Show. 

Economics is somewhat involved 
in this question. Since any program, 
whether regular or special, will get 
better sponsor identification if it is 
not shared with another advertiser, 
then on a limited budget the answer 
would probably be that better identi- 
fication can be achieved via specials 
■ — since weekly sponsorship of any 
regularly scheduled program will be 
costly in today's market, while the 
budget with specials can be controlled 
by the number produced. 

Sponsor identification, however, 
has become a luxury very few ad- 
vertisers can afford today, which 
brings up the point of just how valu- 
able it is compared to the other basic 
criteria. Rating size, audience cume, 
frequency, cost efficiency, for exam- 
ple, are generally given far more con- 



sideration than sponsor identifica- 
tion, and to illustrate the point we 
need look no further than the mul- 
titude of high-rated westerns on the 
air offering good CPM, but leaving 
something to be desired in the spon- 
sor identification area. 

Similarly, unduplicated audience 
reach seems to outrank sponsor iden- 
tification in most advertisers' list of 
tv objectives. Look how few fully 
sponsored weekly shows there are 
left compared to the alternate week 
buys, the latter form sacrificing spon- 
sor identification for the greater audi- 
ence size a number of different pro- 
grams will deliver. And likewise, 
with specials, stature and distinction, 
or merchandisability, usually play a 
more significant role in the selection 
of this type of television buy than 
does sponsor identification. However, 
should sponsor identification be a pri- 
mary consideration, then it can be 
accomplished very well, by either 
route — regular or special. 

Donald R. McCollum, v.p., sales and 
service, Schwerin Research Corp., New York 

This is, of course, an unanswerable 
question. Its main value lies in the 
challenge it imposes to say why it 
cannot be answered. 

There have been attempts to mea- 
sure the sponsor I.D. of regulars, and 
one agency has even come up with 
an index, based on immediate recall 



We don't 
think that 
they are 
comparable 



of the sponsor's name. This is quite a 
valid, albeit relative, measure. [The 
Lawrence Welk Show, if my memory 
serves me, had a very good I.D. rat- 
ing.) Even the regulars present prob- 
lems, however. The phenomenon of 
multiple sponsorship and alternate 




sponsorship, is a very complicatinj 
factor. 

The good old days of radio, whei 
everyone knew that Jello (and latel 
Lucky Strike) sponsored Jack Bennf 
and that Fred Allen's sponsors wer^ 
Ipana and Sal Hepatica are, I'l 
afraid, vanished forever. The mediui 
of radio had a certain intimacy, a^ 
almost mesmeric connection between 
show and sponsor missing in tv. 

The packaged tv show commonll 
peddled along Madison Avenue, mucl 
as a sidewalk hawker merchandise 
wind-up toys, can plainly never lenc 
itself to the sort of sponsor identifi- 
cation that characterized radio at its 
best. The dreary half-hour filmed 
adventure, western or comedy series 
may afford the tv advertiser a "bar- 
gain" in terms of circulation. But 
as a vehicle for the sponsor's com- 
mercials it will probably be a doubt- 
ful investment, and it will never es- 
tablish any sort of meaningful resi- 
dual association with the sponsor's 
product. 

SRC tested a popular variety show 
a couple of seasons ago. This show 
has had a number of participating 
advertisers over the years. When we 
asked respondents to identify the 
sponsors (or products) they recalled 
having seen advertised on the pro- 
gram, correct responses ranged all 
the way from 62 to 1%. 

Similarly, one of the top-rated half- 
hour weekly shows on t^^ which is 
associated primarily with a single ad- 
vertiser, had its sponsor identified by 
only one-third of the audience at a 
Schwerin test session. 

As researchers, we are skeptical of 
the whole concept of "sponsor identi- 
fication," and when it comes to the 
question of _ comparing specials and 
regulars — we just don't think the two 
are comparable. Imagine, for exam- 
ple, a one-shot spectacular on Wed- 
nesday night, featuring Bing Crosby, 
Bob Hope, Ethel Merman, Mary 
Martin, etc., lasting two hours, draw- 
ing an audience of 60 million view- 
ers, and presented by a single spon- 



50 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



regulars? 



sor. Even after 24 hours sponsor 
identification would probably be fan- 
tastically high. But after a week? 
Two weeks? 

The central problem here is essen- 
tiallv one of measurement. It calls 
for devising a measure which can 
compensate for multiple vs. single 
sponsorship, the occasional nature of 
the special as opposed to the regular 
exposure of the weekly show, and 
which can determine at what point in 
time the measure should be taken — 
to name just a few of the variables. 

I don't think a measure this sensi- 
tive exists at the present time. I do 
think the perfecting of such a meas- 
ure should be undertaken by the tv 
research field. But until then, spon- 
sor identification remains pretty 
much of a subjective catchword, 
meaning different things to different 
people. 

C. Maxwell Ule, senior v.p., marketing 
services, Kenyan & Eckhardt, Inc., N. Y. 
I believe sponsor identification is 
an irrelevant measure of a program's 
abilitv to communicate effectivelv. 



Sponsor 
identification is 
an irrelevant 




measure 



The effectiveness of a television 
program as an advertising medium 
should be appraised on the basis of 
how effectively it reaches prospects, 
how effectively it can be used to in- 
form them about the advertised prod- 
uct, and how effectively it can be 
used to influence them in favor of the 
advertised product. 

Preoccupation with extraneous re- 
call measures, such as sponsor identi- 
fication, can only divert advertisers 
and the broadcast industry from put- 
ting advertising media in proper per- 
spective and evaluating them in terms 
of their true objectives. ^ 



g^^ What a year 
this has been 



(so far) for 

YOUNGTVPRESENTATION 



Appointments in 1959 alone. 

(The order is chronological) 

WHCT Hartford, Conn. 

WTVC Chattanooga 

KMSP-TV Minneapolis 

WNTA-TV New York 

KNTV San Jose 



Our old and fast friends: 

(The order is alphabetical) 

CKLW-TV Detroit 

KELP-TV El Paso 

KHVH-TV Honolulu 

WCOV-TV Montgomery, Ala. 

WEHT-TV Evansville 

^VGEM-TV Quincy, 111. 

WICC-TV Bridgeport, Conn. 

WICS-TV Springfield, 111. 

WKYT-TV Lexington, Ky. 

WLOF-TV Orlando 

WPTA (TV) Fort V^ayne, Ind. 

WSEE-TV Erie 

WTVM Columbus, Ga. 



Obviously, this 'phenomenal growth 

has its reasons. Well be happy 

to list them. 



YOUNG TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 

An Adam Young Company 

Xew York • Chicago * St. Louis • Los Anpeles 
San Francisco * Detroit * Atlanta 




SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



51 








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CHEVROLET 

{Continued from page 321 

promotional books titled, "A look at 
the greatest lineup of Chevrolet tv and 
radio advertising that's ever worked 
for you!" (Chevrolet dealers are re- 
portedly enthusiastic about Corvair: 
while it may cut into their regular 
Chevrolet sales, it should increase 
their over-all volume). 

While research and media were im- 
mersed in their respective tasks, the 
C-E creative and radio/tv groups de- 
veloped some ulcers of their own. The 
C-E radio/tv department is unique. 
Under Phil McHugh, as vice president 
of air media, it breaks down into 
four main divisions: an account serv- 
ices group, the creative arm, a busi- 
ness division and a branches depart- 
ment. It comprises 77 people with 
about half fully engaged on the Chevy 
account and the rest devoting about 
75% of their time to it. Unusual too 
is the creative arm under Ken Jones, 
which has bridged the traditional in- 
compatibility between tv producers 
and tv writers by enlisting them under 
the same banner. 

C-E copywriters have had a harrow- 
ing year. They have had to stress the 
"elegance" of the 1960 Chevrolets, 
the torsion-spring suspension of the 
truck line, and the car they had to 
test drive in complete secrecy — Cor- 
vair. 

Fortunately, they have the Product 
Information Department of Chevrolet 
(headed by Walter R. Mackenzie) to 
draw upon. This client arm, located 
in GE Engineering some 15 miles out 
of Detroit, is on top of every tech- 
nical point that could serve as ad 
copy fodder. It furnishes C-E copy- 
writers with all preliminary material, 
checks every finished story board and 
script for technical accuracy. 

Early last winter, a C-E security 
team was cleared to work on com- 
mercials. From hundreds of copy 
ideas, about 25 story boards for tv 
were evolved. At winter's end, a 
client-agency ad committee meeting 
winnowed out and revised these story- 
boards. Some brand new ones re- 
sulted from the meeting. This session 
did not merely look at story boards; 
they saw projected frames of story 
boards complete with musical scores 
and sound tracks. 

From spring to early summer, C-E 
scouted studios, checking on facili- 
ties and security, settled at last on 



Warner Bros, for the tv commercials. 
In charge of shooting for C-E were: I 
Ken Jones, vice president and tv/ 
radio creative director; John Cole- 
man, associate creative director; Bob 
McTyre, Chevrolet tv/radio copy 
supervisor; Hugh Lucas, vice presi- 
dent and Chevrolet radio/tv account 
executive; Jim Beavers, asst. account 
executive on Chevrolet ; and from the 
Hollywood office, Willard Hanes, in 
charge of live and film commercial 
production. 

Director of the commercials was 
Charles Barton, who directed Wall 
Disney's "Shaggy Dog." Warner 
Bros.' own Will Cowan was execu- 
tive producer. Top Warner designer 
Stan Fleisher did the sets and music 
was by Nelson Riddle, Frank DuVal, 
and Hank Mancini (who does Peter 
Gunn music). Actor Eddie Albert 
headed the talent; about 75 extras 
were used. Four Warner Bros, sound 
stages plus a number of standing sets 
were used ( all carefully barricaded 
and screened for security). 

Six Chevrolet cars and the Corvair 
— swathed in wraps — were trans- 
ported in closed vans from Detroit to 
the West Coast. With them went a 
Chevrolet engineer who watched 
over them through the entire month's 
shooting, and Milt Sandling of the 
Chevy account group, who was in 
charge of all security. Milt delivered 
security lectures, issued passes. 

On the Warner lot, the shooting 
was called "Operation Kensinger" 
(the Ken in Ken Jones is really Ken- 
singer), and everyone from grips to 
extras was stamped on the wrist with 
an invisible "K" which showed up 
under ultra-violet lights at the admis- 
sion gate. 

Meanwhile, a Warner Bros, crew 
• flew east to Detroit, where, in a bar- 
ricaded estate, they shot Chevy truck 
commercials. The result was seven 
live-action, two-minute spectaculars 
that are being referred to as "the 
Gone With The Wind commercials." 

In addition, camera crews, opera- 
ting under the same wraps of secrecy, 
were out shooting on location re- 
turned with hundreds of feet of live 
action film to be used to supplement 
the Chevrolet live commercials. One 
such run of footage shot in Lime 
Rock, Conn., follows a new Corvair 
plowing for 20 miles down a shallow 
river and never flooding that rear- 
engine motor ^^ 



52 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 





Horticulture is big business in the market on the move . . 
TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 

Acres of bouquets — in the case of Florida, 21,333 acres of 
flowers and greenery, valued at $35,808,000, shipped to 
Northern markets annually! 

Rich source of this floral wealth is the progressive, productive 
Tampa - St. Petersburg area — "market on the move." 

Comparably progressive, comparably productive as a buy for 

you, is WTVT —"station on the move." WTVT — first in 

total share of audience* (48.6%) . . . first with highest rated 

CBS and local shows! 

*Latest ARB 



station on the move. . . 

WTVT 



TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 
Channel 13 




THE WKY TELEVISION SYSTEM, INC. 
>A^KY-TV Oklahoma City 
>^KY-RADIO Oklahoma City 
Represented by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 19.59 



53 



KNICKERBOCKER 

{Continued from page 39) 

15 suburban and ethnic newspapers 
(a total of 225 lines), 7" x 60" rear 
strips on a total of 223 buses on 
three Long Island lines. Knicker- 
bocker devoted 150 of its outdoor 
locations to six-sheet posters. 

Merchandising to the trade was of 
particular importance, inasmuch as 
increased distribution for each com- 
pany was a primary goal of the cam- 
paign. Supermarket tags were rotated 
in the radio spots. Three groups of 
three chains each were covered. 

Each carried the cost of trade ad- 
vertising to its own industry; both 
sponsors split the cost of ads in 
Grocer Graphic and Modern Grocer. 
Merchandising fliers were made up 
for the grocery trade outlining the 
five-media push. Point-of-sale mate- 
rial was provided. 

Purpose of the campaign was to 
strengthen distribution of each com- 
pany in places where the other was 
strong. Results, according to Atkin- 
son and Herb Stiefel, Merkel account 
supervisor at L. H. Hartman Co.: 

• Increased supermarket recogni- 
tion of both products. 



• Mass displays plugging the prod- 
ucts and the promotion 

• Increased distribution for each 
product in chains and stores where 
the other had the stronger position 

• Increased use of Merkel prod- 
ucts in taverns where Knickerbocker 
has a strong franchise. 

Consumer excitement ran high, too. 
So keen was the interest in Yorkville 
for example, the area's one Chinese 
restaurant even worked out a knock- 
wurst special in order to compete 
with the nearby German restaurants. 

While the tie between knockwurst 
and Knickerbocker's "knock knock" 
theme is obvious, Stiefel says that 
the promotion also created a big 
awareness and sale of knockwurst. 

Knickerbocker has no immediate 
plans at the present time. In fact, 
while revisions are planned for 1960, 
the company has actually cut back its 
tv spot activity in the market to 10 
I.D.'s per week. The reason, ac- 
cording to Atkinson, is because 
Knickerbocker is eyeing both live and 
syndicated film programing for 1960, 
wants plenty of budget available. In 
addition, of course, Ruppert has been 
in the throes of an agency switch. 
(They left Compton this week. 



NL& B 

{Continued from page 42) 

is the "Oklahoma Open House" 
staged last year in Indiana, in con- 
nection with Oklahoma Oil's entry 
into the market, and tied in with a 
special hour-long Herb Shriner radio/ I 
tv simulcast on a 29-station state 
"network." Also, its three-day pre- 
miere promotion for the Yancy Der- 
ringer show, sponsored by Johnson's 
Wax. j 

NL&B, one of the oldest Chicago- j 
based major billers, has shown sharp 
billing gains in the past three and a ; 
half years, and its radio and tv ac- 
tivities have been responsible for 
much of its gains. At present, better 
than 50% of its budgets are in air 
media. 

The agency, during 1958, placed 
22 network shows for clients in the 
U. S. and Canada. In spot radio it 
was responsible for 86,694 announce- 
ments and 15,074 programs. In tv 
spot its record was 7,831 announce- 
ments and 7,334 programs. 

For such major clients as S. C. 
Johnson, Lever, Campbell Soup, 
Kraft and Massey-Ferguson, it has 
already scheduled 20 network shows 
for the 1959-60 season. 




Selling the Buff alo- Niagara Falls market 



«YHBOt. ^t ^gAVICE 




RANSCONTINENT STATION 



R»r^J 



A unique example of how the 
igency's media philosophy is coordi- 
lated with tv planning and program- 
ng is provided by Massey-Ferguson. 
The world's second largest farm 
■(]uipment manufacturer, Massey- 
■erguson has no particular interest 
II the non-farmer. 

I'or this client, NL&B began in 
l'X")8 a new major broadcast venture 
ii\ olving the heavy use of spot radio 
n 50 carefully selected markets using 
iii|)ortant farm radio personalities in 
ach. Massey-Ferguson regards this 
i< the work horse of its advertising 
■tl.irt, and it has proved so successful 
I hat it has been renewed for 1959. 

Farly this year NL&B explored a 
\iiiiin media field for Massey Fergu- 
son. The result: sponsorship of 
VBC's Jubilee, U.S.A. on a 115-sta- 
tiiiii tv network. Behind this move 
iwere months of planning and develop- 
ment work. 

The possibility of capitalizing on 
the dramatic advertising effectiveness 
.1 farm-oriented tv was recognized 
from the beginning to be fraught 
i\ith problems," says Johnson. "For 
' \ample, the high cost of tv dictated 
that a way must be found to elimi- 
nate the inherent mass market circu- 



lation waste if the medium were to 
be efficiently used. The farm market 
with 70% tv penetration is well scat- 
tered geographically and is relatively 
small in the over-all, constituting less 
than one-ninth of U. S. households. 
Moreover, the farm taste in television 
entertainment closely parallels that of 
the urban market. How to isolate and 
reach that group with tv presented 
many seemingly formidable prob- 
lems." 

Thorough study was given to the 
possibility of duplicating Massey- 
Ferguson's spot radio success in tv 
spot. But exhaustive probing re- 
vealed that relatively few stations of- 
fered effective programs and farm 
personalities of this type. "We real- 
ized," says Johnson, "that sponsor- 
ship of local news, weather or enter- 
tainment programing would produce 
an audience, but not a substantial 
proportion of farmers in relation to 
the total. The waste factor made this 
approach impractical." 

NL&B then turned to the possibili- 
ties of network tv. Careful explora- 
tion and research into all conceivable 
types of network vehicles led to the 
standout rural performance values of 
Jubilee, U.S.A., originating from 



Springfield, Mo. This vehicle is 
unique among all network tv in its 
high proportion of farm viewers. 

The show's network Nielsen record 
held no particular attraction. But the 
probing went deeper. Special studies 
confirmed that in farm areas exposed 
to the show, there was a significant 
bias in farm homes. In general, this 
was true without regard to geographi- 
cal or socio-economic variations. 

Moreover, the show delivered a 
highly merchandisable star in Red 
Foley. Massey-Ferguson needed a 
popular star personality among farm- 
ers on their marketing team. Foley 
and his group were tailor-made in 
fitting this requirement. 

Jubilee, a relatively low budget ve- 
hicle as network tv goes, was right 
from the dollar standpoint, too. And 
Foley's merchandisable personality 
with a built-in rural following was 
just the sought-for device to infuse 
branch and dealer enthusiasm. But 
there were other problems: 

The show had always been used as 
a spot carrier. To establish heavy 
sponsor identification, Massey needed 
dominant ownership. This could be 
achieved only through major spon- 
sorship. Also, the station lineup that 




WITH ITS NEW, TALLER TOWER WGR-TV now covers more homes than ever before in the prosperous Western 
New York area and Ginada. Strategically re-located in the center of the prime Buffalo area — the nation's 14th largest market 
— -WGR-TV's new tower still provides metropolitan viewers with the best reception of any TV station. 

Mail and phone calls confirm the fact that viewers in the Southern tier of New York and Northern Pennsylvania now get 
even better reception from WGR-TV. For advertisers interested in across-the-border coverage, WGR-TV now beams 
the best U. S. signal into Toronto and other parts of Southern Canada. 

With complete Video-tape facilities — the first in Buffalo — and the finest NBC and local programming, WGR-TV 
offers advertisers better sales opportunities than any other station in the market. 

For best results from America's most powerful selling medium, call your Petty television representative about availabilities 
on WGR-TV — this year celebrating its fifth anniversary. 



NBC • CHANNEL 2 • BUFFALO 




tr- ma. 



til' 
.III 





rf »'• Mil iM ui? 



"WSVI^-TV., -WSVA, HanisOT^tourg, Va. • KFNIB^TV,, ifFMB, Sfln Weqo, Catif. • KERO-Tv! Baker^^yMl C0Ht. 



existed, left much to be desired by 
Massey's market requirements. 
Through negotiations with ABC, the 
network agreed to full half-hour 
sponsorship. Careful plotting of sta- 
tion coverage figures against Massey's 
sales potential, with emphasis on top 
notch dealer locations, was done for 
every farm area of the country. This 
analysis revealed precisely where the 
prime target areas were. ABC agreed 
to the flexibility required to match 
Jubilee's lineup with Massey's newly- 
determined market profile. 

Manv of the markets did not con- 



tain ABC primary affiliates, only two- 
network affiliated stations. Intensive 
agency and network contacts were in- 
stituted with several dozen hard to 
clear, dual affiliate stations. Result 
was that of the 120 ordered stations, 
very few remained uncleared. 

But one requirement remained. 
How could the network concept be 
brought to the grass roots level satis- 
fying the local dealer needs? Much 
of the success of the spot radio cam- 
paign was directly traced to high 
dealer tie in support locally. So 
through cooperation of the network 



and stations, local cut-ins featuring 
three dealers weekly on a rotational 
basis was the final solution which 
satisfied NL&B and Massey-Ferguson. 



LESTOIUS Dollar 
Buys More on WKOW-TV 



"Our saturation campaign is reinforced at the 
retail level by the merchandising support given 
us by WKOW-TV. Over fifty personal calls on 
grocers, plus a sustained flow of information 
through a merchandising letter 
has kept all our retailers in- 
formed of the sales support 
they can expect. Stocks are 
up, displays are up, shelf 
space is up, and SALES are 
up, thanks to the WKOW-TV's 
splendid support." 

Thomas F. Morissey 
Sales Representative 
Lestoil (Adell Chemical Co.) 

"Thank you, Eleanor 
Miller of Jackson Associ- 
ates, for the opportunity to 
demonstrate that your dol- 
lar buys MORE on 
WKOW-TV. And it SELLS 
more, too!" 

Ben Hovel 
General Manager 
WKOW-TV 




WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 



TV-Q 



RADIO- 10 KW- 1070 



BOETTCHER 

{Continued from page 43) 
rial goes a covering letter outlining 
the advantages of doing business with 
Boettcher. Local inquiries are as 
signed to salesmen who report result 
of all direct contacts. And all in| 
quiries are contacted a second tima 
by follow-up letter and usually agaii 
about six months later. 

Boettcher & Co. believes in prj 
moting its radio show to the hi| 
Here are some of the ways they have 
found effective: 

• Advertisements in local papers, 
magazines and Southwestern edition 
of the Wall Street Journal. 

• Radio promotional spots (Boet- 
tcher's schedule of 100 minutes per 
week earns it 50 on-the-air promo- 
tions of 10 and 20 seconds per week 
from the station). 

• Brochures in color mailed to 
investors and prospects, listing time, 
purpose and contents of program. 

• Radio interviews with Boettcher 
principals on KOA's Western Market- 
ing program. 

E. Warren Willard, managing part- 
ner of the firm, attributes a large 
share of the 50-year-old company's 
continued growth to the use and mer- 
chandising of its Financial High- 
lights program. 

The program, he says, has pro- 
duced inquiries from almost every 
state in the Union as well as from 
foreign countries (including England, 
South Africa and Argentina). 

Importance of this advertising to 
brokerage firms reveals a few eye- 
opening statistics of today's market: 

( 1 ) Number of shareholders on 
the New York Stock Exchange now 
totals 12,490.000 or, roughly, one out 
of every eight adults in the U. S. 

(2) An average of 3,341,000 
shares daily are traded on the Ex- 
change; total shares listed is a 
whopping 5,510,000,000. 

(3) Almost two-thirds of the coun- 
try's adult shareholders are in homes 
with incomes less than $7,500. 

In addition to its home office in 
Denver, Boettcher & Co. has branches 
in New York, Chicago, Colorado 
Springs, Pueblo and Grand Junction 
Colorado. ^ 



56 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




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An inner courtyard of the new WAVE building, with part of the parking area behind. 



'Leadership in LOUISVILLE has a neu; address! 



WAVE Radio and Television have now 
moved into a new broadcasting facility 
which embodies every known ''tool'' for 
better management, better broadcasting, 
better service to advertisers. 

It goes without saying that the new 
building is beautiful. Our principal objec- 
tive, however, was efficiency for our own 
staff and for the advertisers who use the 
facility. 

This we have achieved. Visit us and see 
for yourself! 





^ v^\\\ 



V 




RADIO AND TELEVISION 

725 South Floxxl Street 

LOUISVILLE 3 • NBC 

NBC Spot Soles, Exclusive Notional Representotives 



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The new WAVE Radio and Television Center is one of the most complete 
and efficient "broadcasting plants" in the Nation. ABOVE: The larger of 
our two new TV studios — 65' x 45', and 23' high (large enough for a 
tennis court). BELOW: The conference room, where daily meetings are 
held to plan and co-ordinate every activity involving programming and 
service to the people of our area and the advertisers on our stations. 




■»> 









What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



^ WASHINGTON WEEK 



3 OCTOBER 1959 

C*»yrl|ht l»59 

•PONtOR 

PUBLIMTIOm INO. 



Communications attorneys in Washington get less comfort out of the NBC con- 
sent decree (see page 71, 26 September sponsor) the more they think about it. 

The only thing which could have been worse, in their opinion, would have been a court 
decision doing the same things. As it stands, at least, no precedent has been set for other 
tv/radio operations by others in the industry. 

As was pointed out repeatedly on this page before the Supreme Court decision holding 
that FCC approval of a radio/tv practice does not insulate the practice from Justice Depart- 
ment challenge on antitrust grounds, that decision was calculated to open a floodgate. Jus- 
tice was waiting on the sidelines to jump with both feet into television. 

The sudden and unexpected collapse of RCA-NBC resistance would not be cal- 
culated to dampen this particular eagerness. 

Muscles are currently being flexed at Justice, and there is now even some thought of 
going ahead with challenges of practices the FCC is currently considering in its 
Barrow Report proceedings, without waiting for the conclusion of Commission's look-see. 

It appears almost certain now, for instance, that Justice will seek a court test of the 
legality of network option time. However, in this case Justice will undoubtedly continue 
to wait for the FCC's final decision, since the rulemaking process is at an advanced stage. 

Nobody doubts Justice will be moving in other directions, but there are differences of 
opinion as to which will be first. Guesses as to the first target after the glowing victory over 
NBC include network control over the programing picture, and the talent set-up in tv. 



The FCC makes haste slowly in dropping in new vhf Iv assignments in top 
markets which now have less than three. 

Eventually, however, the Commission hopes by one means or another to give all three 
major networks an even shake in almost all of the largest cities. 

The Commission has already received reply comments on a proposal to add new vhf's to 
Birmingham and Montgomery. The arguments ran a familiar pattern. Those who want to 
operate stations in those cities favored the idea. Those who would suffer competition, 
opposed it. Other proceedings involve Fresno, Bakersfield and San Francisco. Slowly, still 
other markets will be added to the list. 



It might well be that all of the furor raised by the House Commerce Legislative Over- 
sight subcommittee over improper influences on commissioners will boil down to a new 
contest for Miami channel 10, the prosecution of former Commissioner Richard A. 
Mack and his friend Thurman Whiteside for alleged bribery, and nothing else. 

That is, if the full FCC — and the courts — permit the initial decision of Judge Horace 
Stern, special hearing examiner, to stand. Stern ruled that participants in the Boston chan- 
nel 5 case, losers as well as WHDH, did nothing improper in having lunch with then-chair- 
man George C. McConnaughey, and that McConnaughey was similarly blameless. 

If this decision stands, most of the other cases on hand for rehearing will remain on the 
books merely as a technicality. Grounds will have disappeared. 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



59 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercidU 



FILM-SCOPE 



3 OCTOBER 1959 

Ctpyright l»59 

SPONSOR 

PtIBLIOATtONS IN& 



Piel Bros. — up to now primarily a buyer of news and spot announcements 
— has made its first syndication buy in major markets. 

Dealing through Y&R in New York and Philadelphia, the beer advertiser was able to 
clear three time periods during the later evening hours of 9-11 p.m. 

Time periods obtained by Piel's were 9:30 p.m. Monday and 9:00 p.m. Thursday, both 
on WPIX, New York, and 10:30 p.m. Sunday on WRCV-TV, Philadelphia. 

The show in both cities is Ziv's This Man Dawson, which with these transactions is now 
sold in 105 markets. 



The four types of spenders that have expanded most into syndication over 
the past year are foods, beers, tobacco and banks, according to a new Ziv study. 

In an analysis of their own market sales to sponsors, Ziv found a food advertiser in 30% 
of its markets, a 4% increase over last year, and that breweries accounted for 25%, a 2% rise. 

Tobacco and banks made a dramatic jump over last year and now provide 15% of Ziv's 
sales. 

There's a sharp return to program sponsorship buying this fall, if the syndi- 
cation pattern of WPIX, New York, is typical of other stations. 

The station's general manager Fred Thrower attributed the new buying habits of spon- 
sors in part to increased program inventories. 

Under the station's Impact plan, six advertisers that started this spring have renewed for 
fall: Minute Rice and L&M (D-F-S-), P&G (Y&R), and various Bristol-Myers products. 
(DCSS, Y&R, OB&M). 

Renewed children's business includes Kellogg's (Burnett), Nabisco (Mc-E), Henry Heide 
(Kelly, Nason), Ward Baking (Grey). Chunkey Chocolate (Grey) and Drake Bakeries 
(Y&R). 

Note also these new syndication buyers this season: Piel Bros. (Y&R), General Foods 
(Y&R), Paul Masson wines (Weiner & Gossage), and Ballantine (Esty). 



Ratings evidence of this past summer indicates that a good way of stemming 
the usual decline of viewing in hot months may well be with the use of daytime 
programing. 

Although ARB has reported that daytime summer ratings can, in general, be expected 
to fall by 20%, the experience of several stations with a re-run strip such as CNP's Life of 
Riley was that they enjoyed an increased audience share. 

Compare these first quarter and third quarter ARB ratings averages: 



60 



MARKET 


WINTER 


SUMM- 


R 


SHARE INCREASE 


Chicago, 12:30 p.m. 


3.0 


6.1 




121% 


Columbus, 1:30 p.m. 


5.3 


5.4 




14% 


Detroit* 


8.9 


7.0 




165% 


Houston, 6:00 p.m. 


21.0 


16.6 




9% 


New Orleans, 12 noon 


6.8 


10.9 




10% 


New York, 5:00 p.m. 


6.8 


5.7 




45% 


San Antonio, 9:00 a.m. 


4.3 


6.3 




29% 


Scranton-W-B, 6:00 p.m. 


16.9 


14.0 




24% 


*Time period changed from 


6:30 p.m. to 9:30 a.m. 












SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The promotion and merchandising assets of syndicated shows are still among 
the most important reasons why advertisers buy them. 

In the essential area of dealer promotions, KTTS, Springfield, Mo., came up with a 
new wrinkle to reach all 125 Admiral appliance dealers, the sponsors of MCA's Mickey 
Spillane. 

Here's what they did: The station previewed the show in a special early Sunday morn- 
ing telecast, notifying the dealers of this "closed circuit." 

Accompanying the preview was a 15-minute "live" presentation of Admiral sales aids. 

Meanwhile, Hood Dairy has been readying plans to promote its latest film buy in its New 
England markets: The star of Ziv's This Man Dawson has been set for a five-city personal 
appearance tour. 

Add Pontiac to the growing list of advertisers who have bought entire feature 
films for exclusive sponsorship in special promotions. 

In Los Angeles, Pontiac (MacManus, John & Adams) bought the Late Show on KNXT 
on 2 October to spotlight the introduction of its 1960 models. 

Another advertiser using a similar strategy has been Schaefer Beer (BBDO) using 
the Late Show on WCBS-TV, New York, for a set of pre-holiday promotions. 



Some further signs that a swing back to sponsorship is underway in the syn- 
dication field are provided in this: ITC discovered that 83% of its Four Just Men 
sales were direct to sponsors. 

Progresso Foods became the sixth regional advertiser in the show, signing for Boston, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Detroit. 

The sale brings the show into 127 markets, with a gross reported to be S1.45 
million. 



You can expect United Artists to put two more shows into syndication between 
now and March of next year. 

UA-TV reports it has grossed $3.6 million on network deals for Dennis O'Keefe and 
Troubleshooters and $750,000 on 60 markets of syndication sales of The Vikings. 

Based on its $4.35 million volume since March of this year, UA-TV has projected this as 
its domestic gross for its first year: $9 million. 

It's expected that Hudson's Bay and Miami Undercover will undergo a November sales 
push; each might take either the network or syndication route. 

New sponsors reported on The Vikings include Armour, Gordon's Bread, Pepto-Bismol, 
Bufferin, Mr. Clean and Ballantine. 



Apparently Leonard Goldenson's recent call for concerted protective action 
on the export tv film front has triggered this step: the retention of Bill Fine- 
shriver as a consultant to a committee bent on organizing an association of Ameri- 
can tv program exporters. 

Fineshriver's assignment, with the assistance of George Muchnic, lawyer and former 
motion picture executive, basically: 

1) Assist the committee, which is formulating plans for the association, in drafting 
organizational documents, membership qualifications, budgets and recommendations for a per- 
manent staff. 

2) Prepare the necessan,- application qualifying the association as coming under the 
Webb-Pomerene Trade Act, and thereby assisting the exporters in dealing with such prob- 
lems as foreign quotas and customs, foreign price ceilings on tv programs, and the trans- 
fer of foreign currencies and tariffs. 

3 OCTOBER 1959 61 



3 OCTOBER 1959 

Otayrliht itM 

SPONtOII 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



U.S. Steel's huddling with JWT over its ad account seems to have stopped. 

It could be that the strike may have put matters into cold storage. 

This client has been with BBDO as far back as can be remembered. 



Bob Hope still insists that every one of his Buick shows gets at least $50,000 
worth of newsprint promotion among the top markets. 
Half of this budget is contributed by the comedian. 



Could be that the Millionaire is on its last cycle. 
Colgate (via Bates) has ordered some special Trendex figures with a view to 
making an early decision on whether to make a change around the first of the year. 



This virtually has become a pattern among smaller accounts in selecting an agency; 

1) Asking 30-35 agencies to make a bid for the business by letter or presentation. 

2) Inviting 5-7 of the applicants to make a more detailed pitch. 



The dialogue and situations of some of this season's tv film series, say Madison 
Avenue admen, are striving hard to resurrect Hollywood of the early '20s. 
Cited as a glaring example is last week's episode of Johnny Staccato. 



Revlon's Big Party (CBS TV) is taking a long gamble (other than show-wise) : 
The commercials will not only be live all the way but largely ad-libbed. 

This means that the last of the three commercials will depend for length on the 
time left over from the other two. 



A new wrinkle in station-rep relations: A Rocky Mountain station circulated among 
the trade press a mimeographed copy of a memo addressed to its rep. 

The sting in this gambit: The memo, among other things, demanded to know why 
the station lost a couple pieces of national business. 



62 



It's getting tougher for reps in New York to set up appointments with time- 
buyers for visitors from the smaller stations. 

The buyers' refrain: We'd like to meet your station and listen to its story, but we 
just can't squeeze in the time. 

Hence the reps have to do an inordinate amount of scratching around to fill out 
the calling schedule of a stationman who's in town just for a few days, 

SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 




FHE MISER WITH THE MIDAS TOUCH... 



'here never was a miser like Scrooge ... or a 
ear- after-year money maker like U. A. A. 's 
A CHRISTMAS CAROL" ! Once again Alastair 
im's classic portrayal of Scrooge in Dickens' im- 
lortal "A CHRISTMAS CAROL" will be the 
verwhelming favorite of the holiday season . . . 
nee again station after station will be program - 
ling U.A.A.'s traditional favorites: 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL", Charles Dickens' 
eloved Christmas classic, called by many the 
oliday picture of all time! 

STAR IN THE NIGHT',' honored with the Acad- 



emy Award for best short subject. A modern day 
version of the age-old tale of the Three Wise Men. 

** SILENT NIGHT", produced by Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr., delighting audiences for five years. A 
true classic telling how the beautiful song was born. 

"THE EMPEROR'S NIGHTINGALE", a puppet 

picture without peer, narrated by child-charmer 
Boris Karloff. 

Join the other stations, already picking up addi- 
tional sponsors! Don't delay— now is the time to 
order these traditional Yuletide favorites before 
the prints are in short supply. 



Write, wire or phone: 



u.a.a. 



UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 



EW Y0RK,247 Park Ave.,MUrray Hill 7-7800 1 CHICAGO, 75 E. Wacker Dr.,DEarborn 2-2030| DALUS.lSll Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553| LOSANGELES,4Q0S.BeverlyOr.,CRestview6-5886 




NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



THIS IS THE LIFE for WMCA's new disk 
jockey Don Davis, posing outside N.Y.'s famed 
Chambord restaurant. Billed "last of the blg- 
tlme spenders," Davis debuted this month 





OPERATION CLEAN-UP, staged by KIDO 
after flash flood in Boise, got all-out citizen 
cooperation. On-the-scene broadcasting: gen. 
mgr. Jack Link (I), Jim Davidson, sales 



ADVERTISERS 



The advertising departments of 
Corn Products Sales and Best 
Foods (a division of Corn Prod- 
ucts) have been combined, form- 
ing a department with annual ad- 
vertising expenditures of more 
than $20 milHon. 

Albert Brown, v.p. for advertising 
at Best Foods, will head the combined 
department, and with the aid of four 
managers, have direct responsibility 
for the advertising programs of the 
company's more than 20 brands of 
consumer products. 

Corn Products and Best Foods 
merged in September, 1958. 

Another centralized advertising 
setup : 

B. F. Goodrich has transferred, 
from its divisions, responsibility for 
national advertising and has central- 
ized its administration. Frank Tuck- 
er, director of advertising, will head 




IN THE SWIM! When Cabana Pools held its recent exhibit at the Morris Country, N. J. fair. 
WABC (N.Y.) sent out a mobile unit, broadcast Fred Robbins (at mike) popular afternoon d.j. 
show direct from poolside. Cabana Pools is participating sponsor of the Robbins' show 




WRESTLERS ROUGH IT OUTDOORS, attracting more than 2,500 who prefer live to screen 
viewing. The event was KETV, Omaha's All-Sfar Wresillng show; this night moved from studio to 
parking lot adjoining station's bidg. Contenders included Thor Hagen, Dick-the-Bruiser 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



his new corporate advertising deparl- 
i.rit. 

The shift also involves these agen- 
\ changes: 

IIBDO will continue to handle pas- 
rnjier tire ad\ertisin<;. will assume 
i -ponsibility for International divi- 
ion advertising and will play a lead- 
,ng role in development of the gen- 
■ral corporate campaign. 

Foote, Cone & Belding, an agen- 
\ nut previously in the Goodrich 
jiiiilVr will handle home and family 
uoduct group advertising. 

(iriswold-Eshleman, Cleveland, 
mI! handle all Goodrich products de- 
igned for industrial and commercial 
jse. 

\IcCann-Erickson and Cunningham 
V W alsh leave the Goodrich stable 31 
)r( ember. 

ranipaigns: 

• Helene Curtis, for its Spray 

Si'l iMcCann) has bought 16 scat- 

ricd major tv markets, to begin this 

Ai'ck for four weeks. On the new 

inducts front, McCann is bu\ing a 



12-\\eek schedule in 11 West Coast 
markets to introduce Soft and Cur- 
ly. Out of Edward H. Weis, Chicago, 
Curtis will introduce another new 
product I so far undisclosed) in four 
major tv markets for 18 October 
start. Enden's Kings Men line, also 
out of Weiss, is slated for a heavy pre- 
Christmas tv push. 

• Contadina Foods begins, this 
week, an eight-week tv push for its 
tomato paste and pizza mix. The cam- 
paign : 60s and 20s on 34 tv statioTis 
in 20 markets. Agency: C&W, San 
Francisco. 

• Butter-Nut Coffee is being in- 
troduced this month in the Bav Area 
and other major Northern California 
markets via a saturation radio sched- 
ule backed by tv flights. The cam- 
paign: 420 spots a week on 17 radio 
stations in 12 Cal. markets for a 12- 
week period. Agency: D'Arcy, St. 
Louis. 

• PAM Dry Fry will go national 
this fail via a spot tv campaign on 
3.5 stations beginning this week and 
runninii through 1 December. Agen- 



cy: Arthur MeyerhofI Associates. 

• Rainbow Crafts, for its Play- 
Doh modeling clay and newest prod- 
uct, Wood-Doh, is sponsoring tv's 
Dirijf Dong School in 9H cities as part 
of a year-round jjromolion campaign. 
This will be supplemented by 10,000 
tv spots in 120 local markets. 

New product: Gillette Safety 
Razor will market within the next 
few months a new premium-priced 
razor blade, in addition to its Blue 
and Thin Blades. 

Acquisitions: The American Crab- 
meat Co.. manufacturers of Three 
Little Kittens cat food, to General 
Mills . . . Causse Manufacturing 
& Importing (]o. for preserved 
fruits, to the Borden (^o. 

Thisa 'n' data: Esquire Shoe Pol- 
ish is featuring a new contest to |)ro- 
mote its saturation spot tv campaign. 
It's a "Guess how many people will 
see the fall "59 Esquire tv spots" con- 
test for the trade . . . American To- 
bacco Co. will award merit scholar- 



PUNCH LINE pulls a crowd to WJIM's 
(Lansing, Mich.) 25th anniversary celebration. 
Among winsome gal hostesses at week-long 
open-house party were: (l-r) Beverly Wendt, 
Virginia Graham, Gerri Buys, Dorothy Johnson 




KICK-OFF PARTY staged by Broadcast 
Executives Club at the Hotel Vendome in 
Boston, scored a touchdown for co-chairmen 
Gil Sullivan (I), WHDH and Robert Reardon, 
WEED, with pres. Kay Chille, Nona Kirby Co. 





DOWN RIVER CRUISE to witness President's Cup Race, promoted WMAL-TVs (Wash.) fall 
lineup. Aboard yacht chartered for adv., agency guests: gen mgr. Fred Houwinit and bevy of gals 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



6.5 



ships to children of its U.S. employ- 
ees .. . Global Van Lines is taking 
to the airwaves via a national radio 
and tv campaign created around the 
company's new sales theme: "The 
Modern Moving Service for Fussy 
People." ^ 

Strictly personnel : Kenneth Kel- 
ler, to director of merchandising and 
promotion. Warner-Lambert Products 
Division and Thomas McEwan, to 
marketing director, new products, 
Hudnut-DuBarry Division of Warner- 
Lambert Pharmaceutical Co. . . . 
Richard Maass, to Eastern division 



sales manager of Breast-O'-Chicken 
Tuna . . . Timothy Norton, to ad- 
vertising manager, Otoe Food Prod- 
ucts, producers of Morton House 
brands of canned foods . . . Allen 
Snyder, to advertising and sales pro- 
motion manager of Motorola's Semi- 
conductor Products Division. 



AGENCIES 



The many problems involved in 
evaluating tv have intensified ad- 
vertisers' interests in all media 
research. 




WPDQ delivers your advertising message with 

the same impact that smashes home set and match 
point . . . impact that sells the alert 
Jacksonville audience that listens to WPDQ by 
choice, not by chance. Now here is your chance 

... the first agency guy or gal who correctly 

spots the error in form of the illustrated tennis 
player, and wires, phones or writes Bob Feagin, 
WPDQ, will receive a case of his favorite beverage. 



Delivered by 

Vernard, Rintoul and McConnell, Inc. 

James S. Ayers, Southeast 

5000 Watts 600 KC 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 



If you want impact in Jacksonville, Florida ... use WPDQ! 




This need for more research was 
emphasized by Seymour Banks, 
v.p. in charge of media planning and 
research at Leo Burnett, in a talk to 
the annual conference of the Adver- 
tising Research Foundation in New 
York last week. 

Banks' contention: Some Weak- 
nesses in measuring broadcast media 
stem from the fact that the technique 
used to measure radio audiences is 
also used to measure the tv audience. 
Another weakness in tv measurement: 
program ratings are used to evalu- 
ate spot announcements. 

Banks highlighted these three rea- 
sons for the increased desirabil- 
ity of more and new media re- 
search : 

(1) With the continued gain of 
national advertising the advertiser 
is operating at a considerable distance 
from his marketing targets, and there- 
fore needs more research on markets 
than does the local advertiser. 

(2) The increasing complexity 
of advertising media today involving 
significant expenditures of advertis- 
ers ("at times on network tv, $1 mil- 
lion or more for a program which has 
never appeared on the air before") 
brings about more demands for re- 
search. 

(3) The time is now ripe for new 
technological break-throughs and new 
applications of theoretical concepts 
on various aspects of media research. 



Agency appointments: Hussmann 
Refrigeration, Inc., to Gardner Ad- 
vertising . . . The Association of Na- 
tionwide Insurance Agents in the 
Baltimore sales region, to Rogers & 
Collins, Baltimore . . . R. V. Davies 
Co., Brooklyn manufacturers of laun- 
dry detergents, to Ritter, Sanford, 
Price & Chalek . . . Krambo Food 
Stores, 35 store Wisconsin food 
chain, to CampbeJl-Mithun . . . 
Sugarine Co., Mt. Vernon, III, to 
Keller-Crescent Co., Evansville. 

Open branch office: Tucker & 
Wayne & Co., Atlanta and New Or- 
leans, last week opened a Jacksonville 
office, managed by Thomas P. 



Wright. 

New Name: SJP Advertising, Los 
Angeles, now The Jordan Co. 

They were named v.p.'s: Donald 
Booth, at Ted Bates . . . Warran 



66 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




^ 



u 



This has gone far enough. 



55 



Okay — there are more U.S. citizens in Roanoke, 
Va. tiian in London, England. That makes Roa- 
noke bigger than London. 

Okay — there are more Virginians in Roanoke 
than in Chicago. That makes Roanoke bigger 
than Chicago. 

Okay — we won't tell you that Roanoke has 
420,000 tv families. That was the number of tv 
families in the greater Roanoke market. 

You're right — 420,000 is wrong. The latest report 
shows 448,001. 

Careful buyers who plan tv schedules for results 
get what they plan for with WSLS-TV. With full 



power on Channel 10. a healthy assist from NBC, 
strong local programming, and a fat signal that 
starts out in life from a 3934 ft. mountain top, 
WSLS-TV welds a 58-county area into the greater 
Roanoke market of 448,00! homes. 

For more information, watch for our model model. 
Meanwhile, check Blair Television Associates. 



WSLS-TV 



Channel 10 • NBC Television 

Mail Address: Roanoke, Va. 

A broadcast service (with WSl.S Radio) 

of Shenandoah Life Insurance Company 



WSYR Delivers 85% 
IVIore Radio Homes 
Tlian Tlie l\lo. 2 Station 

In an area embracing 18 counties, 402,670 
homes, 1.5 million people with a $2.5 
billion buying-power . . . 

WSYR DELIVERS 
MORE HOMES 
THAN THE NEXT 
T>VO STATIONS 
COMBINED 




Top programming Top facilities ) 
Top personalities make the difference. 

*AII figures NCS No. 2, weekly coverage 




Repreienled Nottonolly b/ 
THE HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO.. INC. 





Hudson 

■ TISSUE 





FOR INFORMATION: 

COMMUNITY CLUB 

AWARDS 

20 E. 46 ST. 

NEW YORK 17 

MU 7-4466 



Schwed, to v.p. and administrative 
director of the publicity-promotion 
department at Grey . . . James Coch- 
ran, to v.p. and account supervisor 
on Renault at Kudner . . . George 
Beyer Jr., to senior v.p. and man- 
agement account supervisor at Lennen 
& Newell . . . James Nelson Jr. and 
Harold Marquis Jr., at Hoefer, 
Dieterich & Brown, San Francisco . . . 
Marvin Rand and Winston Wil- 
liams, at Klau-Van Pietersom-Dun- 
lap, Milwaukee. 

More about people on the move: 
Jack Tarcher, to Doyle Dane Bern- 
bach in an executive and administra- 
tive capacity . . . Allan Alch, to di- 
rector of radio/tv copy and produc- 
tion at Johnson & Lewis, San Fran- 
cisco . . . Thomas Blosl, radio/tv 
director, Botsford, Constantine & 
Gardner, Seattle . . . Keith Hari- 
rier, radio/tv director, Clay Stephen- 
son Associates, Houston . . . Richard 
Lombard!, radio/tv director, Hoag 
& Provandie, Boston . . . William 
Nagler, to account supervisor on the 
Chicago office of Y&R. 



FILM 



The importance of the foreign 
film market to U.S. film compa- 
nies was highlighted by ITC's re- 
port last week of a foreign gross 
exceeding $4 million in its first 
year. 

ITC reported doing $4,346,258 
abroad, of which $1,721,890 was in 
the Western Hemisphere and $2,624,- 
368 was in the Eastern Hemisphere. 

There were 19 shows sold to a total 
of 39 foreign countries. 

Walter Kingsley, ITC president, at- 
tributed booming foreign sales to 
two factors. These were: 

• Soaring growth of television in 
foreign countries. 

• ITC's competitive advantage with 
British partners, removing the quota 
handicaps suffered by distributors 
without such affiliations. 

Sales: Latest sales of Ziv's Lock-Up, 
bringing the show into 189 markets, 
are to Rural Electric Cooperative for 
Montgomery. Ala.; Child's Big Chain 
Food Stores, Tyler-Longview, Texas; 
Barber Transportation Company, 
Rapid City, S. D.; Savannah Sugar 
Refining Co., Johnson City-Bristol, 



Tenn., and Rose-Talbert Paint Co. 
Columbia, S. C. Simultaneously, sta 
tion sales were made to WRCA-TV 
New York. 

Production: The second pilot to bt 
co-produced by Bernard Girard and 
Philip N. Krasne at California Stu- 
dios will be Carbine Webb, a series 
idea based on a Playhouse 90 episode 
written, directed and produced by 
Girard last season. 

Sponsorship: Leading food, beer 
and banking sponsors buying from 
Ziv were announced as part of a 
sponsorship survey. (See FILM- 
SCOPE, this issue.) Among leaders 
in the food category were Armour 
and Co., Hood Dairy, Ki'oger 
Stores and Sago Milk. In the brew- 
ing group were Weidemann Brew- 
eries, Ballantine, Heilmann and 
Carling Beer. New bank, loan and 
savings association advertisers were 
Thorpe Finance, Morris Plan 
Savings and Loan, Household Fi- 
nance and Lincoln Income Life. 
Ziv shows purchased by the above 
advertisers in the survey were Sea 
Hunt, This Man Dawson, Lock- 
Up, Bold Venture and Highway 
Patrol. 

Strictly personnel: Robert Bers- 
bach to head MCA's New England 
territory sales office in Boston . . 
Hollywood Television Service, distrib- 
utor of Republic Studios product, has 
organized a national sales force with 
six division managers: Leon Her- 
man of Buffalo in the East, Doug- 
las Fremont of Atlanta in the South- 
east, Bill Saal of Dallas in the South- 
west, John A. Alexander in the 
mid-central area, Ken Weldon the 
central district and John C Alicoate 
in the West . . . Henry Grossman 
has been named v.p. and technical 
director of NTA's o&o's and Store- 
vision . . . Terry Hatch named Chi- 
cago resident v.p. for Alexander Film 
Co. of Colorado Springs . . . Man- 
hattan Films International, the Inter- 
American Film Corp. and Hal Roach 
Distribution Corp. have named Bill 
Watters and Associates to handle 
advertising and publicity . . . Wil- 
liam Dozier to Screen Gems as v.p. 
in charge of West Coast activities . . . 
Harold "Scrappy" Lambert be- 
comes West Coast contact with net- 
(Works and clients for ITC . . . Nor- 



68 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 19.59 



FIRST 



DOWN 



RATINGS 



PRESTIGE 



COMMUNITY 



SERVICE 




FOR 39 YEARS 

THE UNDISPUTED LEADER 



. ALL YOUR KATZ MAN FOR 

THE AUDIENCE & COVERAGE FIGURES 



OKLAHOMA CITY 

RADIO 

930 K.C. 

INDEPENDENT 

MODERN 

PROGRAMMING 

Owned and Operated by 
The WKY Television System, Inc. 
WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 
WTVT, Tompa-St. Petersburj 

Represented by the Kat^/(gency 



WHAT 
IS A 

PRE RATING 
SALE 



? 



WLUK-TV is out to prove it lias THE au- 
dience in Wisconsin's wealtliy Green Bay 
— Fox River Valley market. To do this, 
WLUK-TV is conducting a pre-rating sale* 
that earns advertisers discounts up to 53% 
above existing rate card prices and fre- 
quency discounts published in Standard 
Rate and Data. WLUK-TV guarantees rate 
protection at SPECIAL SALE PRICES 
until September 1, 1960 for all advertisers 
on the air prior to December 1, 1959. 

If you're an advertiser or time buyer 
who knows, you know WLUK-TV is the 
best buy in Green Bay and the Fox River 
Valley, Wisconsin's Big Second Market. 

LOOK AT THE FACTS: 

On the Nielsen published for March - April, 
1959, Channel 11, WLUK-TV showed a 
strong second position in the Green Bay 
Metro-Area. Since then, we've added the 
following: 

NEW TALLER TOWER 

NEW TOWER SITE OVERLOOKING GREEN BAY 

NEW POWER - 316 KW ERP — GREEN BAY'S 
MOST POWERFUL TV STATION 

NEW CALL LETTERS 
(with $40,000 in regional promotion) 

NEW EXPANDED STUDIOS IN 
DOWNTOWN GREEN BAY 

NEW ABC PROGRAMMING, 
the BIG netw/ork in 1959-60 



Time Buyers who want to keep their rat- 
ings up will see their Hoilingberry man. 
He's ready to talk about the WLUK-TV 
Pre-Rating sale. 



WLUK TV 
€1 

CHANNEL 11 

J«« Mackin, Gtneral Manajer 



Represented Nationally by Geo. P. HoHlniberry Co. 
In Minneapolis see Bill Hurley 



*Nielsen and ARB ratings will be 

taken in November, 1 959, and 

■will be published early in December. 



man (Buck) Long transferred to 
Los Angeles as West Coast manager 
for UAA . . . Stanley Florsheim 
named general sales manager of ITC's 
Jeff's Collie with three new men on 
his force: Ray Grandle in Chicago, 
Jerry Marcus in the West, and Ed 
Traxler from Kansas City. 

Trade note: Flying Eagle Publi- 
cations has filed a restraining order 
charging Screen Gems with conspir- 
acy to appropriate the title Manhunt 
for tv purposes. 



NETWORKS 



Network tv showed in July a rec- 
ord increase in daytime billings 
as compared to the year before. 

According to TvB, daytime's total 
for July 1959 was $16.3 million— a 
47.3% increase over the like period 
'58 while night time gross time bill- 
ings in July totalled $31.8 million — 
a 5.9% increase over July '58. 

The sixth annual convention of 
the CBS Radio Affiliates Associa- 
tion in New York last week adopt- 
ed this three-point program for 
1960: 

fl) Continuing improvement in 
the quality of its programing. 

(2) Intensification of its sales ef- 
forts at rate levels that reflect the true 
values of the medium. 

(3) Resumption of adequate 
compensation of affiliates in all 
time blocks. 

Robert Hurleigh, president of Mu- 
tual, predicted greater separation of 
inanagement of radio and tv stations 
before the Pittsburgh Radio and Tv 
Club last week. 

Noted Hurleigh: "There has to 
come the day when radiomen will 
own and operate radio stations — tv 
men will own and operate tv stations. 
Both are competitive." 

Network tv sales: Carter Prod- 
ucts (SSCB) and General Mills 

(Knox Reeves) will co-sponsor pro- 
grams on CBS TV prior to each of 
the National Football League pro 
games . . . Ansco, beginning in No- 
vember and continuing through the 
Christmas season, to participate on 
Laramie and Tales of the Plainsman, 
both NBC TV . . . Nabisco (Mc- 
Cann) , for Sky King on CBS TV Sat- 



urdays, 12 noon-12:30 p.m. . . . H. J. 
Heinz to participate in Split Person- 
ality, new daytime show on NBC TV. 

Debut dates : Father Knows Best be- 
gins its sixth season Monday (5 Oct.) 
for Lever (JWT) and Scott (JWT) 
on CBS TV . . . Also on Monday, The 
Ann Sothern Show, for General Foods 
IB&B) with a new guest star policy 
for its second CBS TV season . . , 
The Big Party By Revlon, to debut 8 
October, 9:30-11, CBS TV . . . Small 
World returns to CBS TV 11 October 
for Olin Mathieson (D'Arcy). 

New affiliations: KNDO-TV, Yaki. 
ma. Wash., to ABC TV . . . WJIM, 
Lansing, Mich., to CBS Radio . . ] 
KIOA, Des Moines; KRCT, Houston 
and WJJL, Niagara Falls, N. Y., to 
Mutual. 

Network personnel : Louis Dorf 9- 
man, to v.p. in charge of advertising, 
promotion and press for CBS Radio 
succeeding Lou Hausman . . . Guy 
della Cioppa, to v.p., programs in 
Hollywood for CBS TV . . . Edwin 
Friendly, Jr., to NBC TV as gen- 
eral sales executive . . . Tom Judge, 
director, production sales in the op- 
erations department, CBS TV . . . 
New v.p.'s at ABC TV: Daniel Mel- 
nick, in charge of program develop- 
ment; Omar Elder, Jr., general 
counsel and Charles Ayres, for the 
Eastern division of tv network sales. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Within the next two years, the 
Balaban Stations plan a sharp re- 
duction in the number of top 40 
stations. 

The reason, according to John 
Box, managing director: "The 'Bat- 
tle of the Alikes' would bring eco- 
nomic disaster to many imitators." 

Speaking at the southwestern con- 
ference of the AWRT, Box accused 
too many independent broad- 
casters of abandoning their pro- 
graming to the corner record shop 
and the pre-shave crowd and com- 
pletely neglecting the great areas of 
public and community service that 
made radio a dominant media. 

Box urged more advertising and 
promotion in trade publications 
to make media group heads and ad- 
vertising directors aware of radio. 

"If we don't," he added, "we wiU 



70 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




You can eat your cake and have it. Not only is KERO-TV the only single advertising medium that reaches over 1,000,00 
free spenders in California's Southern San Joaquin Valley, It also brings you a bonus of bigtime facilities, an alert, pn 
fessional staff that makes every penny work overtime for you and a marketing and merchandising program that help 
every commercial reach right to the retail counter. Good reasons to be in to the Retry man when he calls! 

KERO-TV CALIFORNIA'S SUPERmarke 

BAKERSFIELD CHANNEL 10 NB 



REPRESENTED BY EDWARD RETRY & CO., INC. 

A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 



cease being a tertiary media." 

RAB culled from a report from 
Life Magazine last week to point 
to a lucrative radio market: the 
teen-ager. 

The facts of Life: "There are 18 
million teen-agers in America today 
worth SIO billion in sales annually. 
By 1970 the market should top $20 
billion." 

Then revealing data from listen- 
ing habit studies conducted for the 
Bureau by Pulse, RAB states: "Some 
97.5% of teen-agers listen to radio 
every week." 

Another popular listening mar- 
ket, as revealed in a new RAB sur- 
vey: the foreign car set. 

Highlight of the survey: "More 
than six out of 10 foreign cars on 
the road today are equipped with a 
radio set." 

Ideas at work: 

• If the shoe fits . . . : To pro- 
mote the opening of Kinney Shoe 
Store in San Diego, KFMB, set up 
its mobile unit in front of the store 
for inters'iewing passers-by and shop- 
pers. As an added crowd-puller, sta- 
tion erected a "Cinderella Throne," 
inviting ladies to sit on it and have 
their foot measured for the "Cin- 
derella Slipper." The person with the 
exact slipper size won a complete 
wardrobe of shoes. 

• Looking for a turtle "in the 
haystack": Recently, KYA, San 
Francisco, secretly released 500 baby 
turtles in the Golden Gate Park, of- 
fering a dollar (plus the turtle) for 
every one recovered and brought to 
station's studio. To date, the promo- 
tion has recovered 180 of the 500 tur- 
tles released for the search. 

• A solution for overcrowded 
golf courses: Ed Harvey, morning 
d.j. on WCAU, Philadelphia, last 
week came up with this idea: night- 
time golf. Accompanied by four cad- 
dies and equipped with luminus golf 
balls, Harvey managed to finish the 
18 holes in two hours. 25 minutes 
with a final score of 88. Some 100 
listeners turned out on the darkened 
fairway to view the game, while sta- 
tion relayed his score to the late night 
audience. Prior to game, listeners 
were asked to guess how long it 
would take Harvey to play 18 holes 
and what his final score would be. 
Prize: a dozen luminus solf balls. 



• Radioes dominance over 
newspapers was demonstrated in 
Cleveland last week when WERE 
broke with three big items in one day 
— before any of the city's dailies. 
Noted v.p. and general manager Rich- 
ard Klaus: "While newspapers and 
magazines do well in most of their 
coverage, I believe it's pretty evident 
that when it comes to immediate news 
reporting, radio can't be beat." 

• Proof of the long-range sell- 
ing power of radio: Last week a 
listener from far-off Alaska visited 
Roseville, Cal., in response to com- 
mercials heard on KFBK, Sacramen- 
to. The reason: He was so interested 
in a car dealer's commercial that 
when visiting the States, listener Free- 
man went straight to the dealer's 
showroom and purchased a new sta- 
tion wagon. 

• On the public service front: 
Flo Wineriter, of KALL, Salt Lake 
City, and his family emerged, the 
other day, from an atomic radiation 
fallout shelter on the L^tah State fair- 
grounds, after spending seven days 
and nights inside the 8x11 foot room. 

• A daffodily: WOLF, Syra- 
cuse, erected a "penthouse" atop the 
Industrial Exposition Building at the 
New York State Fair for d.j. Gene 
Nelson to sit on, sleep on and air his 
show from. His goal: do a solo sit- 
ting stunt for 192 hours. 

Station purchase: KUEN, Wenat- 
chee. Wash., to Joseph Sample and 
Miller Robertson for S105,000, bro- 
kered by Edwin Tornberg & Co. 

Thisa 'n' data: Bartell radio group 
claims 25 million Americans now un- 
der its umbrella, with WOY, New 
York, included ... As a community 
service project, WPEN, Philadelphia, 
asked its listeners to send old radios 
to the working home for the blind. 
Within three days, promotion was 
called off because the home was 
"swamped with radios" ... A total 
of 136 sponsors have purchased time 
on K-EZY, New Orange County sta- 
tion, in the first 90 days of opera- 
tion . . . New home: WGN, Inc., 
will move into a new radio/tv center 
in late 1960. 

Station staffers: E. James Mc- 
Enaney, Jr., to v.p. of WHIM, 
Providence . . . John McRae, gen- 
eral manager, KDWB, Minneapolis- 



St. Paul . . . Gil Wellington, general 
sales manager, KTIX, Seattle . . . 
Glenn Jackson, manager, WTTM, 
Trenton, N. J. . . . Allan Lewis, salr- 
manager, WGR-FM, Buffalo . . . Lou 
Silverstein, assistant general man- 
ager, KSDO, San Diego. 

Resignations: John B. Gambling, 

after 34 broadcasting years, from 
WOR, New York . . . Bertha Prest- 
ler, after 31 years of continuous 
service with Storer Broadcasting. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Rep appointments: WSIX-AM-TV, 
Nashville, to PGW ... The Paul 
Bunyon Radio Group, northern Michi- 
gan, to Venard, Rintoul & Mc- 
Connell . . . WBAB, Babylon, N. Y., 
to Bernard Howard & Co. . . . 
KPIG, Cedar Rapids, to Everett- 
McKinney. 

Rep appointments — personnel: 
Arthur Bagge, to a v.p. and Theo- 
dore Van Erk, tv account executive 
at PGW . . . White Mitchell, to 

manager of the Chicago office and 
Don Waterman, to account execu- 
tive in the New York office of Bob 
Dore Associates . . . William Jones, 
to the Atlanta radio sales staff of the 
Katz Agency. 



TV STATIONS 



If overall share of audience is to 
be maintained or increased, pro- 
gram emphasis must be at the 
local level. 

This viewpoint, often cited these 
days by station operators, was under- 
scored by George P. Storer, Jr., 

v.p. for tv operations at Storer Broad- 
casting at the annual Storer tv pro- 
graming meeting in Detroit. 

Noted Storer: "The day of the net- 
work affiliation alone determining the 
local station's audience position is 
past. It will take greater local pro- 
graming and promotion than ever be- 
fore to help the network retain that 
position." 

Storer also spoke of the great ad- 
vantage videotape has given group 
ownership, in that stations in the 
group find this handy in exchanging 
and adopting program ideas. 

There is a close relationship be- 



72 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




K#\^^^^'' 



S(0^'- 



00^ 



WIARTV- CHANNEL 10 • PROVIDENCE. R. I.- NBC • ABC ■ REPRESENTED BY EDWARD RETRY & CO., INC. 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



73 



tween viewing sporting events on 
tv and in-person attendance at 
these events, according to a spe- 
cial Pulse survey. 

Conducted during July in the New 
York area, the survey highlights: 

• Men who attended ball games 
watched more baseball on tv than 
the non-attenders. 

• Those men going to see a ball 
game also viewed more frequently 
than their stay-at-home counterparts. 

• Basketball games ranked second 
in popularity to baseball insofar as 
in-person attendance at a game was 
concerned. On the other hand, box- 
ing is the #2 viewer sport — with 
65% watching the fights during the 
six months in question. 

• More younger men attend sport- 
ing events than do those in the 35-49 
and 50 and over brackets. 



Ideas at work: 

• They're not telling: With 
Million Dollar Movie entering its 
sixth year on WOR-TV, New York, 
the station has embarked on a new 
slant in tv films. Dubbed Sneak Pre- 
vietv, WOR-TV shows, each week, a 



first-run foreign or doiriestic film, fe- 
vealing its title on the air a minute 
before showing. 

• Something new in sponsors: 

The promotion department of 
WTRF-TV, Wheeling, W. Va., spon- 
sored this past Saturday night's fea- 
ture film on the station. Purpose: to 
sell viewers the NBC fall nighttime 
line-up. Other ways WTRF-TV ex- 
posed the shows: a river parade of 
80 boats; a free day at the race track 
with all horses named after a NBC 
show; the local high school band de- 
voting the entire halftime program at 
football games to NBC show theme 
songs and a fashion show themed 
around the network line-up. 

• Bring the mountain to Mo- 
hammed: Representatives from 
KTLA, Los Angeles, were in New 
York last week with a 30-minute 
video-taped presentation for adver- 
tisers and agencies. Dubbed Million 
Dollar Minutes, the presentation cov- 
ers three things: (1) a rundown of 
the station's fall programing plans, 

(2) an insight into the personnel and 

(3) an outline of sales promotion 
and publicity plans. 



Thisa *n^ data: KABC-TV, Lo 

Angeles, and the Katz Agency, playe 
host to a special presentation luncli 
eon for agency timebuyers and execu 
tives, featuring the slide showing o 
"Spot Tv — The Sales Manager's Me 
dium" . . . TV Guide has come c ii 
with a booklet on the state of t^ 
printing industry leaders' replies t 
Guide's question: "What are you 
opinions of tv, past, present and fu 
ture?" . . . Ampex of Redwood Cit\ 
is sponsoring two half-hour "steree 
tape" programs weekly via KGO 
San Francisco . . . Anniversary: Neu 
York News, via WPIX, celebratim 
its 10th year under the Con Edisoi 
banner. 



On the personnel front: Wil- 
liam Hester, to sales promotion di- 
rector, CKLW-TV, Detroit . . . Paul 
Sciandra, to director of program- 
ing and production at WROC-TA . 
Rochester . . . Holland Low, to the 
sales staff at WWLP-TV, Springfield, 
Mass. . . . Richard Charles, local 
sales manager, KMTV, Omaha . 
Barbara Roberts, to sales service 
supervisor, KTUL-TV, Tulsa. ^ 



HITCH 
YOUR SELLING TO 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 

AND WATCH YOUR SPOT ZOOM 




74 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



THERE'S 
GOLD IN 
THIS STRIP, 
PARTNER! 




6:15-6:45 P.M. Monday-Friday 

First run off network . . . tlie finest western series available for spot acUertising . . . 
WWJ-TV's big family-hour audience! 

Here's a 24-carat opportunity to make big sales gains in the booming Detroit-Southeastern 
Michigan market this fall and winter. Stake your claim in "The Californians' before the 
SRO sign goes up. Your PGW Colonel has complete details. Phone liim today! 



DETROIT NUGGETS 

50% of Michigan's population 
51% of state's retail sales 
. . . all within Detroit SMA. 



- -» o • 0<Ko 




Detroit, Channel 4 • NBC Television Network 

WAA/J-TV 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: PETERS. GRIFFIN. WOOr ..ARD, INC. 

Associate AM-FM Station WWJ 
Owned and Operated by The Detroit News 



SPONSOR • 3 OCTOBER 1959 



to 



I 




very time buyer 
'eads 



so** 



=X*J 



SOR 



BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency /advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS— listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any other 
book in the field. 



SPONSOR 



sells the TEAM that buys the TIME 



CON 

TIN 




says Joe Bauer, General Manager 

WINK-TV 

FORT MYERS, FLORIDA 

"Once you begin doing busi- 
ness with U.A.A. you con- 
tinue," says wink-TV's 

Joe Bauer. He enthusiasti- 
cally exclaims : 

"POPEYE and WARNER BROS. 
Cartoons have terrific appeal 
and POPEYE has held the top 
rating in our area since it was 
first presented. We are also 
more than satisfied with U.A.'s 
'52 AWARD GROUP'-it's the 
best package of feature films 
ever offered!" 

Don't miss out another day 
—cash in on TV's best, most 
profitable products. Get in 
touch with us today and 
learn how U.A.A. caters 
to every market, every 
sponsor ! 



I '■■■■■ ti^l >l!^^^<^v^^B 



UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 

NEW YORK. 247 Park Ave.. MUrray Hill 7-7800 
CHICAGO. 75 E. Wacker Dr.. DEarborn 2-2030 
DALLAS. 1511 Bryan St.. Riverside 7-8553 
LOS ANGELES. 400 S. Beverly Dr.. CRestvievi/ 6-5886 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Robert F. Lewine, v.p. of NBC TV net- 
work programs since 1957, has been ap- 
pointed v.p. in charge of programs at CBS 
Films, Inc. His varied background in the 
programing field began with Cine-Tv Stu- 
dios, where he was v.p. in charge of opera- 
tions. In 1947, he formed his own tv com- 
mercials company; in 1952 he joined ABC 
TV as eastern program director. Two years 
later he was named national program director and, in 1956, v.p. of 
programing and talent. Lewine moved to NBC TV in December '56. 



Alexander Louis Read has been named 
executive v.p. and general manager of 
WDSU Broadcasting Corp., New Orleans. 
He joined WDSU-AM-TV in 1948 as com- 
mercial manager and was named V.p. and 
commercial manager when the corporation 
was formed in 1950. Read is also a mem- 
ber of the board of WDSU Broadcasting, 
director and v.p. of WAFB-TV, Baton 
Rouge and WDAM-TV, Hattiesburg, Miss, 
elude: board member, TvB; pub. dir.. 




His other activities in- 
radio/tv. United Fund. 




John Karol has been named director of 
special projects for the CBS TV network 
sales department. He has been v.p. in 
charge of planning and development for 
CBS Radio since March, 1959; prior to 
that v.p. in charge of network sales for CBS 
Radio since July, 1951. Karol joined CBS 
in 1930 as director of research. This was 
followed by positions with CBS Radio of 
market research counsel, assistant sales manager, sales manager 
and the aforementioned posts. Karol was graduated from Harvard. 



Robert Flanigan has been promoted to 
midwest manager, in Chicago, of the John 
E. Pearson Co. He joined the rep firm two 
years ago after some 20 years' experience 
in the field, including: NBC Spot Sales in 
Chicago, sales executive for WOV, N. Y. 
and the Storer Broadcasting Co.'s stations 
in N. Y. and Chicago. Flanigan was grad- 
uated from U. of Illinois and DePaul 
College of Law. Another Pearson promotion 
up the Atlanta office and cover The 




Jon Farmer, to head 
Southeastern Territory. 



78 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




Roy AcuH's 
OPEN HOUSE 

A brand new, syndicated telefilm series of 39 one-half hour shows, 
with ROY ACUFF — Master Showman and Undisputed King of 
Ciountry Music — as Host — and featuring: 



The Fabulous Wilburn Brothers 
Blonde, Beautiful Miss June Webb 
The Riotous Smoky Mountain Boys 
The Open House Square Dancers 
Guest Stars Galore 



,A Powerhouse of fast-moving Town and Country Music, comedy 
and dancing to SELL YOUR CLIENT'S PRODUCT from Madison 
Avenue to Main Street! 




Decorative Miss June Webb tairly 
"melts" a song. 



Teddy and Doyle, tlie handsome 
Wilburn Brothers." 




Here is the answer to the television fan's recurrent plea for 
first-rate Country and Western musical fare. "Open House" 
packs more music into 30 action-filled minutes'" than any 
other syndicated show — is notable also for its freshness, 
gigantic cast and unusually high film quality. 

*26:30 min, actual time 

AVAILABLE TODAY! 

WRITE — WIRE — PHONE 

Distributed by 

ACUFF-ROSE ARTISTS CORP. 

p. O. Box 9157 — 2508-B Franklin Road 
Nashville, Tennessee Cypress 7-5366 



Sales Representafives 
John T. Link, Nashville 
Ben Berry, Chicago 

........... MAIL COUPON TODAY -. 



Cypress 7-5366 
Central 6-1805 



^ladcap antics by Grandpap and 
Bashful Brother Oswald. 



Roy and .June kibitz, mi it- 
banjo pickln'. 




'l^r'^Oi^ 



Alabama Relies — Connie Ellis and ■Laughln' It Viil .\ t.vDical moment 

Melba Montgomery. at "Open House." 



Acuff-Rose Artists Corp. 

P. 0. Box 9157 — 2508-B Franklin Rd., Nashville, Tenn. 

n Is the "Roy Acuff Open House" telefllm 
series still available for this market? 

□ Please furnish us complete information 
about "Roy AcufT's Open House." 

Z; May we see an audition print of "Roy 
Acuff's Open House"? 



Title Station . 




City . 



. Zone State . 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Is your agency sloppy and careless about the electrical transcriptions it sends to 
radio stations? Norman Boggs, v.p. and general manager of KHJ, Hollywood, 
speaks here for dozens of station men when he says that the effectiveness of 
many national spot radio campaigns is being seriously impaired by low quality 
transcriptions and inadequate replacements. His frank talk to advertisers and 
agencies is No. 2 in the new SPONSOR series, "The Seller s Viewpoint," de- 
signed to point up to buyers of air media facilities, important industry problems. 

**Not willful but disastrous sabotage'* 




#%gencies, the biggest and best of 
them included, are guilty of sabotag- 
ing the effectiveness of their clients' 
radio campaigns time after time after 
time. Not willfully, of course, but 
nonetheless just as disastrously. 

We at KHJ, along with every other 
conscientious station, spend stagger- 
ing sums in the installation and con- 
stant maintenance of our equipment, 
in order to deliver to the listener the 
cleanest, purest, noise-free sound pos- 
sible. The least malfunction is in- 
stantly caught and corrected. In the 
music we play, the slightest deviation 
in quality is pounced upon by the 
engineering staff and new records im- 
mediately replace those which fall 
short of perfection in reproduction. 

When we come to the playing of 
commercial transcriptions, however, 
we too frequently find ourselves 
mouse-trapped into a morass of red 
tape or indifference which is a dis- 
grace to Madison Avenue and all its 
side streets. Doubtless, the original 
concept and planning of a national 
spot campaign are boldlv conceived 
on a "don't spare the horses" basis. 
No reasonable expense is shirked in 
the selection of talent. Singers, mu- 
sicians, big names, comedy stars — 
whatever it takes to achieve the ob- 
jective — meet with no finicky hag- 
gling about price. Quality is the or- 
der of the day. The account execu- 
tive, knowing the importance of at- 
tention to detail, probably watches 



over every step of the process like a 
mother hen. Nothing but the best 
will suffice. 

The choice of stations, as we all 
know, is also made with meticulous 
reference to all the factors which will 
assure the utmost in results to the 
client. Power, frequency, coverage, 
management, type of programing, 
kind of audience, position in the mar- 
ket. Certain agencies, we understand, 
even apply audience surveys against 
the station rates in order to develop 
a comparative defined as "cost-per- 
1,000." In other words, every phase 
of the complex is scrupulously germi- 
nated, nurtured and supervised to the 
end that the best of all possible com- 
mercials will saturate the best of all 
possible markets on the best of all 
possible stations. 

Comes D-Day, when the account 
exec is informed that the pressings 
have all been acknowledged as re- 
ceived by the stations, the schedules 
have been set, all is in readiness and 
The Miracle of the Bells I ringing cash 
registers) is about to be performed 
all over again. He heaves a sigh of 
the justly weary and relaxes in a 
state of self-satisfaction. But in that 
very relaxation lie the seeds of dis- 
service to his most important bene- 
factor — the Client. 

What happens is that the stations 
start off happily running their 10 or 
20 or 30 spots a week but, long be- 
fore the expiration date, comes word 



from engineering that So-and-So's 
ET's are scratchy or cracked or other- 
wise below the station's performance 
standards. Wires or, many times, 
phone calls then go forward to 
S.B.F.P.&O.. or whoever has the ac- 
count, requesting immediate air mail 
replacement. Days later, the Client's 
image is still being fractured by the 
same old mutilated platter, the listen- 
ers are wondering why a company as 
big as So-and-So, Inc., assaults their 
ears, to say nothing of their intelli- 
gence, with a squawky Grade C com- 
mercial. When S.B.F.P.&Q. are sent 
a frantic reminder to get out a new 
platter, a fourth assistant assistant 
vaguely thinks maybe somebody no- 
tified his girl to notify somebody to 
tell Gigantic Recording to send a new 
platter to, "What was that station, 
agam .' 

Could more responsible people in 
more responsible agencies be induced 
to be more responsible in this re- 
spect? Why not keep a supply on 
hand at the agency, already packed 
and ready to be shipped NOW? Why 
not keep a tally on the frequency of 
replacement requests and insure per- 
fection by ordering out new ones to 
all stations at decent intervals? But 
if that's too logical, at least pay im- 
mediate attention to those stations 
who are doing their level best to in- 
fluence their listeners on behalf of 
your client. ^ 



80 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




CONSOLE CONVENIENCE 



10-SECOND SPOTS - 

PRACTICAL AND PROFITABLE WITH AN AMPEX 

Spot commercials pay off. And even 10-second spots become practical with an Ampex Videotape* 
Television Recorder. Here's how these Ampex exclusive features make it possible . . . 

• TAPE TIMER Locates the 10-second spot on a reel ... measures in hours, minutes and seconds 
. . . lets you set up 2, 3, 5 or 7 second cue -in for programming the 10-second spot. 

• 2 -SECOND START Recorder is in full, stable speed fast. . .permits even a 2-second cue with 
a safety margin. 

• WAIST HIGH TAPE DECK Permits loading of next commercial in seconds... reels lie secure- 
ly without locks. Table top provides extra work space. 

• AUTOMATIC BRAJiE RELEASE Makes reels free wheeling . . . tape pulls easily for fast 
threading — without tape stretch or crease. 

Write, wire or phone today for an Ampex representative — or ask for the new, fully illustrated 
brochure describing the new Ampex VR-IOOOB. Whatever you want to know about the advan- 
tages and profits in TV tape, get the facts from Ampex. AMPEX HAS THE EXPERIENCE. 



934 CHARTER ST. • REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



TM AMPEX CORP. 



^ ^ - 


Ampex 


\\ / - 

VIDEOTAPE 


CORPORATION 


\y 


professional 1 
products division 1 



Offices and Representatives in Principal Cities Ttirougtiouf ttie World 



SPONSOK • 8 OCTOBER 1959 



81 



SPONSOR 



Different and creative radio 

Cynics who persist in thinking that "all radio stations are 
alike" will do well to investigate the extraordinary record of 
station WGAY, Washington, D. C. 

Since 1 June, 1959, WGAY has been on the air as the 
"Voice of Government People" broadcasting minute-long an- 
nouncements of government news at every 15-minute break 
to the 400,000 government workers in the Washington area. 

In less than three months, WGAY's new creative approach 
to public service has won a large audience, and plaudits from 
the Neiv York Times, the Washington News, advertising lead- 
ers and members of Congress. Rep. Joel T. Broyhill has 
read into the Congressional Record a lengthy tribute to 
WGAY's program schedule of uninterrupted good music and 
government news. 

Surely, here's proof that radio stations can be different and 
can be creative, without copying each other's service. 

Salute to a veteran editorializer 

Back on 23 April 1951, sponsor, in one of the first trade 
journal editorials ever written on the subject, encouraged 
radio and tv stations to engage in energetic and aggressive 
editorializing on the air. 

Our Sponsor Speaks column on that date quoted at length 
the views of Daniel W. Kops, one of the pioneers in the then 
uncharted field of broadcast editorializing. 

During the past eight years, Dan Kops, now president of 
WTRY, Albany-Troy-Schenectady, and WAVZ, New Haven, 
has helped hundreds of others to enter this challenging broad- 
cast area. 

Recently, he has been honored by being chosen co-chair- 
man (radio) of the NAB's Committee on Editorializing. And 
only last week, he opened the annual meeting of the Associ- 
ated Press Radio and Tv Association of which he is president. 

We're proud to salute an old friend, and a veteran fighter 
for the editorial viewpoint. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A more realistic view 
of ratings by agencies, advertisers and stations. 
Ratings are valuable quantitative data, but are 
not complete guides for air media selections. 




i 



82 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Birdland: Powell Ensign, exec. v.p. 
of Everett-McKinney, Inc., passed 
along to us the script of a program 
feature by the New York State Radio 
Bureau on the subject of "The Her- 
mit Thrush" which contained this 
illuminating passage — "Both the male | 
and the female hermit thrush • • . ; 
look alike. In fact, the birds can't 
tell each other apart! When the male I 
has picked out his nesting territory, [ 
he chases all the other thrushes away 
— including the females." That's car- 
rying the hermit business too far. 

Thinking man: On Tve Got a Secret 
(CBS TV), a guest once impressed 
the panel by showing seven miles of 
string he had saved. Asked Garry 
Moore, "Is this your hobby?" "No," 
said the guest, "this is my secret. For 
a hobby, I collect lead pencils." 

Definition: A "calculated risk" is 
10% calculation and 90% risk. — 
Frank Hughes. 

Dram for Dracula: Tv horror mov- 
ies have inspired a new cocktail for 
vampires: blood and vodka. It's 
called Tomato Mary. 

Statistician: Ira Cook, star of his 
own show on KMPC, Hollywood, has 
received from record companies to 
date over 3,000 45-speed records and 
660 albums. On this basis, he's 
worked out the following data on a 
d.j.'s problems with "time and space." 
The 45's, if stacked in a pile would 
come to 20 feet high. Albums aver- 
age 12 songs per, or total of 7,920 
two-and-a-half minute numbers which 
would take 137.3 days to play. 

Quote: "Very few of us are here be- 
cause anyone really wanted us to be 
at the moment of conception and 
fewer of us will leave of our own will- 
Long life is a privilege granted to a 
great many more of us nowadays than 
formerly and I believe we make a 
mockery of it if we fail to do three 
things: strive for personal excellence, 
strive to leave the world a little bet- 
ter for our passage, and try to learn 
to live without fear." — Arthur God- 
frey in TV Guide. 

No mystery: Not all the horror 
movies on tv are so labeled. — Charles 
V. Mathis. 



SPONSOR 



3 OCTOBER 1959 




take your choice 
...and THE 

is KRLD-TV 



All three of the latest, nationally recognized and respected surveys* 
show an outstanding viewer preference for KRLD-TV, Channel 4 in 
Dallas. To reach the 675,000 TV Homes in the great Dallas-Fort Worth 
Market, choose the BONUS BUY . . . KRLD-TV. Ask a Branham man. 

*Telepolse, June '59; Nielsen, July '59; and ARB, August '59 



mtmi} 



represented nationally by the Branham Company 



THE DALLAS TIMES HERALD STATIONS 



John W. Runyon 
Chairman of Ihe Board 



Clyde W. Rember) 

Prei.dtnf 



MAXIMUM POWER rv-Twin to krld rodio loso, cbs outlet w.th 50,000 wons 



iMs 



KSi-- 



You can't cover 
growing Jacksonville 



i 



'■.-.- TV-'-,' 



^■iiM 









#" 







without WFGA-TV 



"Busting" at the seams describes Jacksonville's tremendous business growtti. In 
every section of Florida's Gatev^ay City and porlicularly along the bustling St. Johns 
River waterfront, new modern buildings such as the 16 story City Building 
(left) and the County Courthouse ore adding to the beauty of the city. 

But the beauty of a city does not lie in its buildings clone. The real beauty it reflected 

in its growth . . . and such is the case with Jacksonville, which has registered 

an amazing 665% increase in population since 1900 . . . end it's still growlngi That's why 

you can't cover Jacksonville effectively without WFGA-TV. No one station dominates 

the rich $1 '/j billion market, but only WFGA-TV offers the best of two great 

networks — NBC-ABC. 



'■^I^' 



CHANNEL 



12 



issr^^'GrJB^'n^i^ 



I I i s 

file Best at 



K M L 1 I , F L I I 
and ABO . . . Call Peters, iriffin Woodwifii, Inc 



i i 



'^-'X^MJ-AA. i£i. SM ii^ilj ^ '^.i^- '"Ji^^ 




lO OCTOBER 1«S» 
40< m copy • SS ■ y«ar 




i 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




TV GETS SE 
FOR THE BIG 
TOY PARADE 



Spot, nets coffers may 
get $9 million from 
toy makers this year — 
up $6 million over '58 

Page 29 





PORTLAND, OREGON 



announces the appointment of 
Edward Retry & Co., Inc. 

IS its national sales representative. 



Adman's dream 
comes true-the 
Henderson agency 

Page 34 

Profile of the 

radio-active 

housewife 

Page 39 

CBS' ^Handy Andy 
for harried 
timebuyers 

Page 44 



;y 






THE 






TOUCH 



si^^'T^mM 



From pencil sketch to exquisite finish, only 
the brilliance of the precious gems out- 
shines the quality reflection of the master 
jewelry designer. 

When this same "quality touch" is pos- 
sessed by great television and radio sta- 
tions, the all-important quality reflection 
shines in many ways! 

Represented by 



Edward Pelry A Co.. Inc. 




Jewelry design by BELLOCHIO — l\ 




radio & television • dallas 

Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORTH market 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



The Original Station Repretentative 



DES MOINES TELEVISION 

FACTS 



The most recent TV audience measurement made in this market 
(Nielsen, July, 1959) revealed that KRNT-TV delivered 
more television homes than its competitors. 

The survey by ARB in January of 1959 showed the same thing. 



SPECIFICS: I 

(from Nielsen, July, 1959 survey, homes viewing) [ 

Paar on KRNT-TV leads against movies by 19.8%! 

The KRNT-TV 10:30 PM strip of local and syndicated 
half-hours leads against movies by 21.9%! 

The KRNT-TV 10:00 to 10:30 PM local news, weather and 
sports leads against news - weather - sports by 46.6%! 

And here is something to think about. Among local 

advertisers, where THE TILL TELLS THE TALE, KRNT-TV 

consistently carries more local advertising than ; 

its competitors combined! i 



MORE SPECIFICS: 

KRNT-TV carried over 80% of all the local business in 1958 ! 
KRNT-TV carried over 79% of all the local business in 1957 ! 
KRNT-TV carried over 80% of all the local business in 1 956 ! 

So far in 1959, KRNT-TV's local business is running at about 
the same ratio. Yes, when that cash register must ring in order to 
stay in business, those who know the stations best 
choose KRNT-TV four to one! 



DES MOINES TELEVISION 
KRNT-TVcHANNEl8 

A COWLES STATION REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



how to get 
AHEAD in 
Knoxville 




. . . it's easy! Just use our 
sharp signal to cut out your 
competition. WBIR-TV has 
the most top-rated shows . . . 
call your Katz Man for de- 
tails. 

WBIR-TV 

CHANNEL "I £\ 

KNOXVILLE-TENN. 




J'oL /.I \o. 41 • lO OCTOBER 1959 

ft^%J 1^ 3 OR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Here comes the tv toy parade 

31 Spot and network tv investments by toy manufacturers this year may well 
hit 19 million, up |6 million from last year, as the Christmas rush begins 

Agency in exurbia: the Henderson operation 

34 In the Blue Ridge Mountains is an agency that might be the adman's 
heaven; it grew with television, now has about 85% of its billings in it 

Corning test-markets a tv push 

37 Here's how Corning tested all media against tv in market-by -market 
introduction of Corning Ware, applied findings to new national push 

The radio-active housewife 

39 An important, new profile of the American housewife's radio listening 
habits, just completed by Market Planning Corp. and H-R Representatives 

A poet looks at radio/tv potential 

42 Pulitzer-prize winning poet and playwright Archibald MacLeish has 
some penetrating and profound advice about public interest tv and radio 

How radio got more elbow room for chickens 

42 National Broiler Council tried "subtle sell" via chatty radio show 
and heavy product tie-ins. Result: 10% increase in chicken sales 

How many, how much? 

44 CBS TV Spot Sales bases a series of special studies on A. C. Nielsen 
data, comes up with "The Cumulative Data Finder": a tool for buyers 



FEATURES 

14 Commercial Commentary 

64 Film-Scope 

25 49th and Madison 

68 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

4 Newsmaker of the Week 

68 Picture Wrap-Up 

52 Radio Basics 

9 Reps at Work 

76 Seller's Viewpoint 



46 Sponsor Asks 

66 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

78 Sponsor Speaks 

60 Spot Buys 

50 Telepulse 

78 Ten-Second Spots 

75 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

63 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. S8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 • 
year. Other Foreign countries $1 1 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 




strong links pull more sales 
In Texas' Major Market 



. ^- 



Now . . . the strong sales potential of 
America's 15th largest market . . . 

HOUSTON 

. . . linked to the strong, 
cost-efficient . . . f aK^ilities of . . . 

KTHT 

7dO kc. • 5000 watts 
are^old nationally by . . . 




'I 



AVERY-KNODEL 

i 

f INCORPORATED 

I 

* exclu^ve national sales representative 



NEW YORK ATLANTA DALLAS DETROIT 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES CHICAGO SEATTLE 



/ 



Between Atlanta 
and the Qidf ♦ . * 
the only primary 





outlet is * * * 

WALB-TV 



CH. 10— ALBANY, CA. 




• New 1,000 foot tower, 316,- 
000 ^vatts power . . . with 
Grade "B" coverage includ- 
ing Albany, Thomasville, 
Valdosta, Moultrie, Ga., 
and Tallahassee, Fla. 

• Serving over 750,000 people 
... in an area with over 
$739,000,000 spendable in- 
come. 

WALB-TV 



ALBANY, GA. 
CHANNEL 10 



JP 



Raymond E. Carow, General Manager 

Represented nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 

In the South by Jabes S. Ayers Co. 

One Rate Card 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The big question occupying Madison Avenue^s attention th\ 
week is whether CBS TF's revolutionary rale card chang 
tvill open a Pandora's box. Effective 1 April 1960 the 
tvork will sport a new discount structure under which adver- 
tisers ivill pay less for early, more for late evening shows. 

The newsmaker: William H. Hylan has spent his entire 
working life with CBS. But there probably have been few times 
during this 22-) ear period which have witnessed more soul-searching 
at the network than that which preceded the okay of CBS TV's new 
discount structure. For the first time in video's brief, hectic history 
a network tv sales chief (Hylan is vice president of sales administra- 
tion I has been telling clients that their network time costs will depend 
on what time of the evening their show runs. 

There is no change in the basic rate structure: gross time cost in 
the evening will not vary by time periods. However, the age of tape 
has brought about one significant revamping in the calculating of 
an advertiser's gross. Henceforth, station rates will depend on 
New York time and not local time as heretofore. The reasoning be- 
hind this is that, aside from the complications involved in the calcula- 
tions for each station, there is now, with tape, a standard repeat pat- 
tern. This means the web and client can safely estimate the value of 
each originating time in terms of homes using tv. 

There are two prime aspects to the new discount structure. One 
is the new time-period discounts. These provide il) a 10*^ t discount 
for evening shows aired before 8 during the winter season and (2) 
discounts ranging from 35 to 45 "/f (depending on the time period) 
during the 13-week summer season beginning 1 June. While the 
summer discounts work out to about IC^/^ over 52-weeks — which is 
little change from the old annual discount — for the first time summer- 
only advertisers will benefit. The other aspect is that station-hour dis- 
count has been lowered for winter season programs broadcast be- 
tween 9 and 10:30 p.m. 

The net result is that clients broadcasting between 6 and 8:30 p.m. 
will get higher discount maximums while those on between 9 and 
11:30 p.m. will get lower discount maximums. The discount spread 
for 52-week advertisers now ranges from 19 to 34% . 

While all networks have attempted to overcome advertiser reluc- 
tance to buy early evening and summer by deals and program con- 
tributions. CBS feels that such cost manipulations are basically an 
inefficient form of selling — one normally confined to a limited list 
of clients. Now, the entire gamut of advertisers are CBS prospects. 

Will the other networks follow CBS' lead? To those in the know, 
it is hard to see how they can avoid it. As for spot rates, a CBS 
study indicated the spread for announcement rates at 7:30 and 9 
p.m. is already greater than the CBS discount spread. ^ 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 







SHOWMAN WITH A 
SENSE OF VALUE* WILL 
lAM ■ ■ SHAKESPEARE 



William Shakespeare understood people. "The play's the thing" . . . and his plays transmuted 
the values of his time into a living image of his world, valid for all time. William Shakespeare 
sold the world of Elizabeth I to all of history. A great showman . . . but above all, a great sales- 
man. The Show's the Thing at WRIT . . . creative showmanship directed toward presenting 
the value of your products, services and ideas with impact to the greatest possible audience. 
Our people are showmen in presenting the News and Music, and your message . . . and salesmen 
in every creative presentation to our audience — your market. In Milwaukee, WRIT transmutes 
the values of our time into creative selling messages for you. Above all, WRIT is a salesman. 

Buy RADIO ^ken you huy WIL ^^^ BALABAN STATIONS 

medm Buy BALABAN when St. Louis m tempo Kflth the times 

you huy radio Buy WRlTu hen '[^Ha^ John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director 

you buy Milwaukee and you WRIT Bernie Strachota, General Manager 

BUY the people who BUY Milwaukee Sold Nationally by Robert E. Eastman 







D 







"Brennan in for WGN" 



Terry Brennart, former All American and 
head coach from Notre Dame, is "color man" 
on WGN Radio's Midwest College Game of 
the Week* this fall — another example of that 
"something extra" which Midwest listeners 
have come to expect from WGN Radio. 

*Sponsored by General Tire & Rubber Company and Oak 
Park Federal Savings & Loan 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 




^J^^^ 






other ^^extras^* are: • On Cubs' baseball, 
former player-manager, Lou Boudreau • On 
Bears' Pro Football, former all-star pro 
guard, George Connor • Greatest all-round 
sports staff in the nation composed of vet- 
erans Jack Brickhouse, Vince Lloyd, Jack 
Quinlan and Lloyd Pettit. 



Add to this the best in music, public service 
programming and top personalities — it's no 
wonder WGN Radio reaches more homes 
than any other Chicago station! 

WGN RADIO-CHICAGO 

THE GREATEST SOUND IN RADIO 



-I'ONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 







m 



mmmmmmmmmmmmim 




I 



It's whafs between the music that counts! 

"The Nuts and Bolts of Radio," by George Skinner, 

The Katz Agency's Director of Radio Programming Services, could easily 

have been titled "It's What's Between The Music That Counts." 

For this book discusses in detail all the elements that 

go into the creation of a successful station "sound image": 

what they are and how to make them work. 

Because we believe that effective programming j)atterns should 
not be locked in vaults but should be passed around for the 
improvement of the medium as a whole. The Katz Agency is making 
"The Nuts and Bolts of Radio" available, upon request, to all 
those in the business of radio broadcasting and advertising. 

THE KATZ AGENCY 2 

666 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 19, NEW YOKK 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • hOS A\GELES 
DALLAS • ATLANTA • ST LOUIS • SAN FRANCISCO 



SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



3S at work 




-rank McNally, Hcadley-Reed. Inc., New York, is concerned hv the 
uiinber ot stations uhicli he feels have been deluded by rating fig- 
iics. and program accordingly. "I think things have become so 
infused that a few very basic statements are needed to clear the air. 
\(l\ertisers want to sell the public. Fine. Radio ha? proved itself to 
naiiv advertisers as the outstand- 
iiiu medium to do the job for 
(hem. Sales records have been 
impressive. All well and good. 
But. broadcasters, in order to re- 
tain this high degree of respect 
and success, must be progressive. 
There's the rub. Agency buyers 
tend to place too much emphasis 
on a station's numbers, which in 
turn may be greatly influenced b\ 
the teen-age audience. Now a com- 
mercial on this type of station 
may never penetrate the listener's mind, let alone create an impulse 
to buy." Frank feels that stations must have a balanced program 
format and reach a wider range of the market where more total buy- 
ling power is concentrated. "Sales made on the local level attest to 
>the fact that stations which are constantly striving to serve their com- 
iHiunitv \vill survive long after the "beat rocks' run to the ground." 

Ralph Guild, Daren F. McGavren Company, Inc., New York, is per- 
plexed bv the naive attitudes of certain admen concerning the eco- 
nomics of running a radio station. "It seems incongruous for media 
i personnel to complain about both 'double spotting' and 'high rates.' 
The onh \\ a\ a radio station can avoid 'double spotting' is to make 
I enough money "single spotting' to 

B ^KKf^^ma^ 1^^^ expenses and show a reason- 

^^^^"'^^ able profit. Should the client want 

his campaign aired on a station 
that gives some thought to pro- 
graming, rather than one which 
just spins records, he must expect 
to pa\ for it. The cost of running 
a radio station in todavs comijeti- 
tive market has sk}rocketed. and 
in most instances rates have not 
gone up in proportion to ex- 
penses." Ralph points out that, 
aside from higher salaries paid to a larger staff, major recent re- 
finements of standard equipment and new technological develop- 
ments account for an imposing slice of the up-to-date station's bud- 
get. "Stations have taken these steps to provide improved service and 
coverage. Lnless the agencies are willing to accept reasonable in- 
creases in spot costs, they will ultimately force multiple spotting." 




V4 



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Editor and Publisher 

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Secreta ry-Treasu rer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP-Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

IManaging Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinker+on 
W. F. Mlksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 

Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Mid«vest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberq 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken. Office Mgr. 
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by John E. McMillin 







Commercial 
commentary 



Laxatives, deodorants, bras and girdles 

That new report on the tv advertising of "per- 
sonal products," recently released by a subcom- 
mittee of the NAB'S Tv Code Review Board, 
leaves me feeling sort of puzzled. 

"Personal products," of course, is a wondrous 
classification that lumps together such juicy items 
as laxatives, deodorants, depilatories, body lo- 
tions, women's razors, toilet tissues, cold and 
headache remedies, corn plasters, callous removers, bras and girdles. 

I suppose that fully 90% of the squawks and gripes about tv 
commercials concern these esoteric commodities and I wholly sym- 
pathize with anvone who tries to grapple with such a bristly, con- 1 
stipated and sometimes evil-smelling problem. ' 

Under the circumstances, I think the committee — E. K. Harten- 
bower, KCMO-TV. Kansas City; Donald H. McGannon, Westing- 
house Broadcasting and Gaines Kelly, WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. 
— have done an extraordinarily honest and intelligent job. 

They have carefully reviewed dozens of personal product commer- 
cials, and the complaints raised against them. They have thoughtfully 
analyzed the elements in some of these announcements which seem to j 
ofFend good taste. And they have prepared a series of common- 
sense rules — what to seek and what to avoid in personal product 
advertising — which they offer as a "general guide to those who create 
and produce television commercials." 

Their conclusion: There is an "urgent need" for a "self-examina- 
tion" by broadcasters of advertising in this field. 

Creators, critics and censors 

To such decent, honorable sentiments I'm sure most of us will 
breathe a fervent and thankful "amen." 

Before, however, the last swelling organ tones of our hosannas 
die away, certain nasty, nagging questions intrude discordancies. 

How, in heaven's name, can you make such recommendations 
stick? Do you honestly believe that stations and networks will en- 
force these standards? Do you think that agencies and advertisers 
will accept them? 

Messrs. Hartenbower, McGannon and Kelly say their proposals will 
require the "ingenuity and cooperation of advertiser, agency and 
broadcaster — an unbeatable combination." 

Sure, but can you get them to combine? 

Without meaning to seem cynical or defeatist, I suggest that, in 
the matter of tv commercials, advertisers and broadcasters are often 
on wholly different sides of the fence. 

The stations and networks are exhibitors of an advertising product 
they do not create or pay for. The advertiser and agency owe their 
primary loyalty, not to the television medium, but to the welfare of 
a single corporation. 



14 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



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10 OCTOBER 1959 



I We had a bunch of | 

j /^V^ the boys^l 



'local advertising 
agency men, and 
ocal advertisers. 






. . . they 
watched ABC's 
CLOSED 
CIRCUIT 
PREVIEW 
. . . heard just a 
word or 
two about 
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has changed! 

LOCALLY 

THEY'RE 

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ON 

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Take a tip from the local boys 
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amar i llOy texas 




C. R. "Dick" Wottx 
Vice-President and 
General Manaser 



Represented 
nationally by the 
Boiling Compony 



Commercial commentary {continued) 



If you attempt to overlook or minimize these differences, or if,| 
you fail to understand that they often produce real conflicts of in- 'I 
terest, you are grossly oversimplifying the problem. 

I think it would be lovely if we could get the lions to lie down 
with the lambs, and have the creators, critics and censors of adver- 
tising all snuggled up together in the same cosy bed. 

But look, fellows, let's be realistic. , 

The chief, and often the only, reason for the appearance of: 
offensive commercials on tv screens is the fierce competition within 
the industries which originate them. 

I'm told, for instance, that the drug industry — the fountainhead 
of "personal products" — has been under tremendous pressure from 
the AMA and other groups to change its tv treatments. 

So far, though, with the notable exception of Miles Laboratories, 
a long-time champion of decency in advertising, most drug companies 
have been afraid of giving a copy edge to their competitors. 

Do you think that under these circumstances their agencies — 
including such giants as Bates and Y&R — are going to be moved by 
a polite suggestion of "common sense rules" frorh an NAB committee? 

Don't you think they may even resent being told how to create 
commercials by people who are not professional admen? 

As a matter of fact, advertisers often resent hearing that they 
"owe" something to tv — over and beyond paying their bills. 

Last year. Bart Cummings of Compton. stuck his neck out with a 
suggestion that networks and advertisers cooperate in donating 
prime time to public service shows of importance. i 

There were howls, growls and complaints (though not public ones) 
from big budget advertisers who felt they had no such responsibility. 

If you talk with agencies and ad managers these days you'll find 
many thoughtful men who wish that the tv industry would set up and 
police its own rules — and free them of all public obligations. 

The two alternatives 

Perhaps this is a feasible idea. Certainly it is one of two alterna- 
tives for solving the problem. In the field of "personal products" 
commercials it means setting up a tough, specific, no-nonsense code 
— and administering it absolutely with the unanimous support of all 
networks and principal tv stations. 

Can this be done? Maybe, but it is going to require more iron in 
the broadcasting industry tfian I've seen so far. (At present, for 
instance, only four of New York's seven stations accept the Tv Code.) 

Furthermore, I'm not at all sure that it is the right approach. 
I believe that the only lasting solution to the problems of offensive 
tv commercials must come from the advertisers themselves. 

Top managements in "sensitive industries" ( you've got to go 
higher than ad agencies and "creators" of tv copy) must be made to 
recognize that, for the privilege of using tv, they must accept its re- 
sponsibilities. 

This is a hard doctrine to sell. It will require a brand new kind of 
effort. It will be resisted at every turn. Many in the industry will 
be afraid that it will drive advertisers away from tv and toward 
other media. 

But sooner or later I believe that tv must turn on its clients and 
demand that they share its 'obligations. I think the NAB committee 
has made a fine start. But there's a long rough road ahead. t^ 



16 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 




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18 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

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SPONSOR -SCOPE 



10 OCTOBER 1959 
o«i«iiM im 

•PONSOR 
PUBLIOATION* INO. 



There's a dual-camp rush for the westcoast going on: (1) Network program 
people bent on getting started with freelance })roducers on material for the 1960-61 season 
and (2) jittery agencymen for a look-around at what might be on hand if they have to 
cancel their present shows at the end of the 26-week cycle. 

To seasoned Madison Avenue showmen the mood and mental attitude of the rush offer 
a curious study in jumping before the mold is set. They pose these questions: 

• Wouldn't it be better for the hunt-bound agencymen to spend the time im- 
proving what they've got than to concentrate on what they think are greener fields? 

• How can the network people predicate their future programing stock on past 
performance — particularly as to types — when they don't know how the viewers will react 
at the rating polls to the new product just going on the air? 

Planning ahead, they admit, is an imperative of tv, but it can be detrimental if the 
timing isn't right. 



General Mills is taking its first stab at using the medium itself to apprise its 
national sales staff of all the company's tv ramifications for the 1959-season. 

It will be done in November by closed circuit via ABC TV, with General Mills sales- 
men and their district chiefs gathered for the event at that network's affiliated stations. 



CBS TV's latest effort to break down the seasonal nature of the medium is some- 
thing that analytical minds among spot tv sellers have been urging for some time. 

Their contention has been that tv's foremost problem was not getting business but in- 
creasing the number of spot users — or broadening their base — so that there wouldn't be 
those sharp seasonal valleys and peaks. 

(See page 20 for reaction sumup to CBS TV's changes in discount structure.) 



If you hold some shares of AT&T, you'll be interested in knowing the bill to the 
three tv net works for transcontinental circuits will tote up to over $35 million for the 
current year. 

The estimated allocation: $13-14 million for CBS TV and NBC TV each and 
between $9-10 million for ABC TV. 

Point of comparison: Line costs for the four radio networks this year is expected to 
run jointly between $13-14 million. 

Tv, apparently is not going to let the magazines get away much longer with 
their methods of comparing ad exposure vs. tv commercial exposure. 

NBC Research, in particular, is working up an analysis that will answer these magazine 
exposure studies. 

What especially bums the researchers in tv is that the figures checked out for maga- 
zine ads are mostly bigger than the calculations shown for tv by Nielsen. 

Another objective of the NBC TV project: To knock down the magazines' practice of 
automatically deducting 20-25% of potential tv home exposures on the theory that 
percentage of viewers are away from the set when the commercial is on. 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Some of the 8tation§ carrying two tv networks have found, so to speak, more 
than one way to skm the commercial unit cat. 

As observed by agencies checking logs: In the event of a network program promo 
not applying to them, such stations pass up the promo and link together two 20- 
second commercials. In the process they also pass up selling an ID. 

Ted Bates goes to the head of the class for the second consecutive "season" as 
the agency with the most gross tv network time billings. I 

The top 10 agencies as compiled by LNA from 1 October 1958 to 30 June 1959: 

RANK AGENCY GROSS TV NETVi^ORK TIME BILLINGS; 

1 Ted Bates $32,585,000 

2 J. Walter Thompson 27,358,000 

3 Young & Rubicam 24,627,000 

4 Benton & Bowles 22,160,000 

5 Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 19,663,000 

6 BBDO 18,024,000 

7 McCann-Erickson 15,436,000 

8 Lennen & Newell 11,032,000 

9 Leo Burnett 10,169,000 
10 William Esty 8,682,000 

Note: In evaluating these rankings consideration should be given to the fact that much of 
the billings are credited to the agency of record and they are not representational of the 
money spent on programing. 

P.S.: The collective billings for the above 10 agencies constitutes a little over 40% of 
all the tv networks for the nine-months period. 

You can expect the competitors to counter CBS TV's latest broad changes in the dis- 
count structure with some strong revisions of their own. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE found the reaction among agency media directors to CBS' new discount 
pattern — revolutionary in one respect — somewhat mixed, but the favorable sentiment 
decidedly outweighed the opposite. A smattering of the pro's and con's: 

• Patterning the rate structure to set-usage levels provides a more precise value 
for the advertiser. This realistic yardstick — revolutionary for air media — is tv's one big [ 
departure from traditions brought over from radio. 

• Setting different values for the various hours of the evening shows (1) the me- 
dium has become more competitive and (2) the networks had to yield to mount- 1 
ing pressure from advertisers more discriminating with their dollars. 

• The basic idea of allowing substantial discounts for summer recruits is commendable, 
but the plan contains marked inequities for the 52-week advertisers. [ 

• The top night-time spenders (like General Foods, P&G, Campbell and Lever), who hold 
mid-evening spots, will, as a result of the novel time-period discounts, wind up with paying, 
in effect, rate increases. General Foods agencies estimate the client will have to budget 
at least an additional $500,000. 

The basic changes in CBS TV's discount structure: 

1 ) Whereas the station-hour discount goes up for the summer, late evening dis- 
counts for the remaining 39 weeks are reduced. 

2) The dollar volume for the network's over-all discount is increased from a weekly 
base of from $100,000 to $130,000. 

3) Prime-time advertisers occupying periods before 8 p.m. are entitled to a special j 
discount of 10' r in the winter and 45% in the summer season. 

4) The same 45% summer discount applies for the 8-8:30 period, drops to 40% 
for the next half -hour and slides to 35% for the 9 to 11 p.m. span. 

20 SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 I 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Barter has r<»artMl ilH liea«l in notwork tv?: As pari payment for 12 ilaytime 
quarter-hours ABd TV took over from Coty six 30-minute fihns starring Maurice 
Chevalier. The Coty participations start next week and extend into May. 

Coty (BBDO) will continue to use spot tv from time to time. 



Quite a mass of analytical data has heen suhinitted to Colgate to help guide its 
future program-buying and other policies with regard to network tv. 

Among the studies was one showing how average ratings and shares have fared 
since the three networks became closely matched on audiences and others ])urporting 
to show that all the other big daytime advertisers are given to the scatter plan concept. 

To illustrate what's been happening to night-time audience quotients as a result of 
the intensified network competition, one of the studies made these points: 

1) During the 1957-58 season 90% of the 30 top-rated shows got a share of 
45% or better, whereas during the 1958-59 season only 23% of the 30 top-rated 
shows carved out a 45 share or better. 

2) Only 18 of the 53 regularly scheduled newcomer programs in the 1958-59 
season — or 34% — were continued under sponsorship in the 1959-60 season. 

Here's a chart of the breakdown by type of those survivors, with "successful" designat- 
ing shows that got 10% or more above the average rating for all evening shows and "re- 
newed" indicating programs that didn't do as well but were continued. 

RENEWED 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
7 

Note: The 18 shows that survived represented 34 /i of the total new shows. 

Colgate alone among the seven biggest-spending advertisers in daytime network tv 
doesn't spread its participation among many programs, as shown herewith: 

NO. DIFFERENT 
SHOWS 
9 
9 
2 
9 
9 
9 
9 



TYPE 


TOTAL NEW SHOWS 


SUCCESSFUL 


Suspense-Crime 


13 


2 


Westerns 


10 


6 


Situation Comedy 


8 


1 


Variety 


8 


1 


Aud. Partic.-Panel 


7 





Adventure 


4 





General Drama 


3 


1 


TOTAL 


53 


11 







NO. 1/4 HRS. 


^ERTISER 


NETWORK 


PER WK. 


P&G 


CBS-NBC 


34 


Lever Bros. 


ABC-CBS-NBC 


161/2 


Colgate 


CBS 


11 


Amer. Home 


ABC-CBS-NBC 


10 


Sterling 


CBS-NBC 


7 


Toni 


ABC-CBS 


61/2 


Gen. Mills 


ABC-CBS-NBC 


6 



One thing already revealed by the gigantic continuing qualitative media study 
being conducted by JWT: Tennessee Ernie is the hottest air salesman that's come 
up the pike since Arthur Godfrey. 

This performer, according to data ci)nipiled. nol only gets a lopnofcli believability and 
likeability quotient but sells Fords like Godfrey used to sell teabags. 

JWTs basic objective of this study, which has been going on for some time, relates to 
( 1 I all media and (2) the relative effectiveness of each to selling in specific cases. 



10 OCTOBEU 1959 



21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Three significant job appointments in agency and network circles this week: 

Mort Werner as v.p. and director of Y&R's radio and tv department; Don Coyle 

as v.p. in charge of ABC's newly formed international division and Sig Michelson as 

president of CBS News. 

(For details see Agencies and Network NEWS WRAP-UP, starting page 68.) 

Numerous sections of California will benefit, starting 26 October, from the spot 
radio and tv barrage that Liggett & Myers is unlimbering in behalf of its new Duke 
Cigarette (McCann-Erickson). 

The original plan had been to confine the initial blasts to L.A. and San Fancisco. 
At the going rate the Duke will spend around $3 million on spot over the next 13 
weeks. 

The three tv networks this August jointly did 12.6% better than they did the 
like month of 1959, bringing the plus margin for the first eight months up to 10.2% 

The August 1959 gross time billings by network: ABC TV, $8,205,520, plus 18.5%; CBS 
TV, $21,238,979, plus 9.6%; NBC TV, $17,743,026, plus 13.8%. Total for that month; 
$46,743,029. Grand gross for the initial eight months of 1959: $403,046,540. 

Looks like the 20-8econd prime-time spot may, after all, wind up this quarter as 
a likeable sort among the authors of tv commercials. 

Reps reported this week that agencies are latching on to 20's with alacrity — that is, after 
they've made a stab at requesting the now-hard-to-find minutes. 

However, the calls for IDs is still in the problem area, as far as sellers are concerned, 
and some reps are suggesting that if this situation persists after the first of the year there may 
be need of a reappraisal of the ID's pricing. 

ABC TV has embarked on a studied effort to induce some of the Jack Paar 
show's advertisers to defect over to ABC's daytime schedule. 

A client that's spending $7,500 on Paar weekly was informed that for the same budget 
he'd get these comparative weekly advantages on ABC: 

FACTORS NBC TV ABC TV 

Cost-per-thousand $3.01 $1.46 

Home impressions 2,490,000 5,031,000 

Women impressions . 2,440,000 4,125,000 

Different homes* 5,837,000 8,531,000 
*Over an average four-week period. 

Tap a rep sales development director who's done a lot of traveling lately on 
what's awry about tv selling in the main and he'll tell you it's the misdirection 
applied in promoting the medium. 

Shaved to the nub, the points he'll make arc these: 

• Because of the high stakes involved in tv, the summit of approach can no longer 
be the media director. 

• Borrowing a leaf out of Sunday supplements, a lot of pressure must be exerted not only on 
ihe accountmen but the prospects' sales manager and field sales executives. 

• There should also be a much closer working relationship with the marketing re- 
search people not only in the agency but in the prospective client's own organization. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 60; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 68; Washington Week, page 63; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 66; Tv and Radio Newsmaker, page 75; and Film-Scope, page 64. 

22 SPONSOK • 10 OCTOBER 1959 




for every 10 "gas dollars" spent in 
Indianapolis Trading Area . . . there 
are $12 spent in its Satellite Markets. 

More cars than you might suppose are pumping up 
service station sales in the satellite markets — even 
more than in the 18-county Indianapolis area. 
That's why this big Mid- Indiana market is different 
. . . and why this bonus coverage on WFBM-TV 
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Where else do you find such a widespread area 

only basic NBC coverage of Americans 
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SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



23 




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\ bomb 

I'erhaps there are favorable com- 
iicnts to be made on your 19 Septem- 
Mi issue feature: "Tests Show 8 Rea- 
lms Why Commercials Fail"; how- 
\cr. I sincerely doubt it. James 
\\ itherell claims it's the "upper-mid- 
I It-class" tastes of the nation's ad- 
uii. Superb! Whatin'ell is the "up- 
Mi middle-class"? How do you de- 
li in- it? Is it economically categor- 
ized or is it socially defined? If eco- 
iiniiiically, what are its limits: $5,000- 
lus per year? If this is true, let 
Witherell be reminded there are 
Ph.D.'s making less than that . . . 
hence they are "middle" or "lower- 
middle" class and wouldn't under- 
stand the commercials anyway re- 
iiardless of the number of letters af- 
ter their name. If this "upper-middle- 
class" is socially defined, then there 
are no "bright young men" to under- 
stand the commercials because every- 
one knows that all society who are 
slum-dwellers are without doubt im- 
becilic creatures "yearning to breathe 
free ' but without the intelligence to 
cope with their situations. 

There is. true, an attempt at the 
socio-psychological significance of the 
commercial but it doesn't get off the 
ground. Examples given (8 — count 
'em — 8 1 are poorly chosen. Nearly 
anyone with a year's experience in 
copy writing should know them. A 
wagging finger and a clucking tongue 
to SPONSOR for bothering with the arti- 
cle at all. It was not worth writing: 
unless, of course, it was for presenta- 
tion to a "lower-lower-middle-mud- 
dled-class" copywriter. Too bad. 
Chester Trouten 
continuity dir., WCUE 
Akron. Ohio 

All for versatility 

■"Should writers sjjecialize or work 
in all media?" (Sponsor Asks, 12 
Sept. I Of the three quoted experts 
who took stands on this question, 
Victor Bloede of B&B gets my vote. 
(Please turn to page 28) 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



is loaded with advertisers who prove good copy 
and FRESH AIR just can't miss! Radio Catalina's new program- 
ming format is a potent sales weapon . . . hitting a responsive 
audience throughout Southern California at an average 71% 
less cost than other major ■ regional stations. 




■ 



John Poole Broadcasting Co., Inc. 

6540 Sunset Blvd.. 

Los Angeles 28. Calif. 

Hollywood 3-3205 



Klational Representative: 
Weed Radio Corporation 



25 



JuOaC thaw £V£iR! Long the number one station in the nation's number one marke 
today WCBS-TV offers advertisers even more than the biggest audiences in all television. 

Channel 2 viewers are also the most responsive, as proven in a new, full-scale depth stud 
conducted by the Institute for Motivational Research, in association with Market Planning Corpc 
ration (an affiliate of McCann-Erickson). Example: when asked which of New York's seven channel 
*'has more of the programs that really make an impression, the ones you talk about," 2 out of ever 
3 respondents interviewed named WCBS-TV. Conversely, when asked which channel was bein 



*<:■ 



WCBS-TV 



eferred to in this statement, 'Hhey don't seem to have many new programs— I've seen most of them 
efore," only 2% mentioned WCBS -TV— compared to 85% who named non-network stations. 

Outcome? A distinct "chmate of responsiveness" resulting in more anticipation, more active 
iewing on the part of Channel 2 audiences. And, according to the Institute's report, "'far greater 
ittention and interest in both programs and commercials seen on Channel 2!" Call WCBS-TV 
|r CBS Television Spot Sales for more of the findings which demonstrate why, now more than ever 
efore, New York's blue-ribbon advertising medium is CBS Owned Channel 2 . . ."WCBS "TV 




iljli 



m 




Smidley, 

done it 

again! 



You just can't get it through the old 
noggin. You can't cover the Pacific 
Northwest without Cascade. Why 
Smidley, this Cascade four-station 
network wra])s up a market with 
more food sales than Toledo or 
Oklahoma City. You get the picture, 
Smid? They've got an E.B.I, that 
tops Indianapolis or Newark. And 
gel this! (Cascade Television is the 
only network serving the entire mar- 
ket. Let's not pass it up again. 








KIMA-TV 
KBAS-TV 



YAKIMA, WASH. 



EPHRATA. 
HOSES CAKE, WASH 



l/rpn TW PASCO. RICHIAND. 
l\Crn-|T KENNEWICK, WASH 

KLEW-TV '--'-" 



for facts and figures: 

Notional Representatives: Pacific Noithwest: 

GEORGE P. HOUINGBERY Company MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



49TH & MADISON 

{Continued from page 25) 
Postscripting his view, may I submit 
these additional premises: 

1. Losing transference of media 
impressions, and resultant sponsor 
image, is a risk when copy assign- | 
ments are departmentalized into print i 
or radio/tv. Realistically, of course, 
one copywriter cannot often execute 
one national campaign. But at least ' 
give the last dance to the fellow who 
brought the idea ! 

2. Particularly insofar as slogan^ 
are concerned, the combination cop) • 
writer will anticipate snags in adapta- 
tion to either print or broadcasting. 

3. The art approach in print and 
tv overlaps enough to warrant inclu- 
sion of the copywriter as a buffer in 
planning stages for both, e.g., a maga- 
zine photograph can be the tv writ- 
er's raw material. 

And a hitchhike on the above for 
Sponsor Asks: Should ivriters special- 
ize or work? 

Marilyn Lees 

cojiywriter 

Botsford, Constantine & Gardner 

Portland, Ore. 

Imports have air problem 

Re your two-part story on Detroit's 
use of air media for their car adver- 
tising (sponsor, 26 Sept. and 3 Oct.), 
I'd like to shed some light on the 
much underplayed foreign side of the 
picture. Everyone knows that im- 
ported cars are now a billion dollar 
industry, but strangely enough many 
radio and television station salesmen 
and their reps continue to think of 
this field as a catch-all. There seems 
to be very little recognition of our 
problem, which is to establish first 
identity and then reliability. 

Because we need identity with a 
specific group we have to be on, at 
or around the same time each day, 
because we want to impress viewers 
or listeners with our reliability, we 
need a local peg or personality, and 
finally, because our budgets don't 
match those of Detroit, we can't go 
for spectaculars or for special events. 
What we can go for, and what we 
in the iMi|)orted car field would like 
from radio and tv, is time salesmen 
who think in terms of what we need, 
not what they have available. 

Kingsbury E. Moore 

pres. 

Kingsbury E. Moore Adv. 

Hempstead, N. Y. 



28 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 




K 



OA-KOA-TV now operating from the finest broadcasting facilities in the rocky mountain west ■ NBC in Denver 



SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



29 




There now are one million men, women and children in Metro- 
politan Atlanta. Or by the time you read this, perhaps more. 
Newcomers are arriving by plane, train, car and stork at the 
rate of 516 per week. 

Atlanta is the dynamic, hard-working, good living heart of 
that vast region served and sold l)y WSB Radio and WSB Tele- 
vision. We invite you to share the rewards of this great and 
growing market's present and future. 



ATLANTA'S 



3 RADIO 
WSB-TV 



Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. NBC affilate. Represented by Retry. Associated with WSOC/WSOC-TV, Charlotte; WHIO 'WHIO-TV, Dayton 
30 SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



^ SPONSOR 

10 OCTOBER 1 959 



HERE COMES 

THE BIG TV TOY 

^ 'Perfect ad mediuni' may get $9 million from the 
toy companies this year— $6 million more than in 1958 

^ Expanding markets, tv's demonstration potential, 
draw big and small toy makers into spot and network 




I V channels are being readied for 
the biggest toy parade ever to march 
across the nation's screens. An esti- 
mated $9 million — some $6 million 
over 1958 figures — will be poured 
into the medium b) enthusiastic toy 
manufacturers this year. 

Tv, according to Melvin Helitzer. 
director of advertising and public re- 
lations for Ideal Toy Co., is the "per- 
fect ad medium" for the toy manu- 
facturer. Nor is he alone in his 
opinion. 

SPONSOR, in surveying the upcoming 
heavy selling period for the industry, 
finds 55 major toy companies on the 



air this fall heralding their Christmas 
lines ( for complete list, see page 32 i 
— proof indeed that the toy makers 
know television s persuasiveness with 
mothers as well as children. This fig- 
ure is a minimum number, including 
only the majors who are buying net- 
work programing or intensive spot 
and local schedules in multiple mar- 
kets. The number of sponsors rises 
into the hundreds when you include 
lal jobbers and wholesalers advertis- 
ing regionally or localh and I b I toy 
retailers, who were among the first 
in their industry to recognize the 
sales potential in local tv programs. 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



PARADE! 



Dollar figures show a phenomenal 
gain in t\ tov investments for both 
networks and stations, with 1959 set- 
ting what even two years ago would 
seem to be an incredible record of 
growth. In 1957. for example, the 
total tv investment for spot and net- 
work was $2.1 million — $1.6 million 
for spot and $506,000 for network, 
according to the Television Bureau of 
Advertising. 

^ et last )ear time sales to toy com- 
panies were hiked some 30'/( as the 
total figure grew to $3.5 million — 
$2.H million in spot. $681,000 in net- 
work. 

Current figures show even more 
definitively that all of the major toy 
firms have jum|)ed on the tv wagon. 
TvB reports sales for the first half of 
this vear are up W i compared with 
the same period last year — and the 
big selling season is \et to come. Here 
are the first-half figures: spot, for six 
months in ".58 and '59: $.500,000 vs. 



31 



pllllilllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllil!lllll!llllllllllil!lllllllli!ll!lllllll|||im 



Toy companies using tv this season 



* 



Admiral Tov (s) 


Kiddyland (s) 


American Character Doll (n) 


Knickerbocker Toys (s) 


American Flyer (n) 


Kohner (s) 


American Metal Specialties (n) 


Lionel Toys (n), (s) 


Amsco (n) 


Lowell Toy Mfg. (s) 


Benay-Albee Novelty (s) 


Louis Marx (n) 


Big Top Games (s) 


Mattel (s), (n) 


Blockraft (s) 


Newark Felt Novelty (n) 


Milton Bradley Games (s) 


Parker Bros, (n) 


Carnell Mfg. (n) 


Playskool (n) 


Climax Industries (s) 


Playtime Products (s) 


Colorforms, (s), (n) 


Radex Stereo (s) 


Crayola (n) 


Rainbow Crafts (s), (n) 


Dart (s) 


Remeo (s) 


Dennis Play Products (s) 


Revell (s) 


Donnell Toys (s) 


Sawyer-Barker (s) 


Emenee Toys (s) 


Schwinn (n) 


Fun Bilt Toys (s) 


Standard Toykraft (n), (s) 


General Toys (s) 


Stori-Views (n), (s) 


A. C. Gilbert (s), (n) 


Structo Mfg. (n), (s) 


Gong Bell Mfg. (s) 


Tarrson (s) 


Hassenfeld (s) 


Tonka (s) 


Highlander Sales Co. (n) 


Toy Shop (s) 


Hill Toys (s) 


Transogram (s) 


Hubley (s) 


U Toys (s) 


Ideal Toy Corp. (n), (s) 


Various Toys (s) 


K Toys (s) 


Welded Plastics Corp. (s) 


Kenner (s) 


Wonder Books Inc. (s) 



g *Souroes: SPONSOR survey of networks and station representatives; Toys and 

= Novelties magazine : TvB. (n) designates network sponsorship; (s), spot pro- 

H graming and/or announcements. Si)ot includes both local station and national 

^ station representative business. 



$1,279,000; network, for the first 
seven months, of each of those two 
years, $189,824 and $476,495. 

Projecting these figures — with the 
first half of the year accounting for 
about 20'/f of total toy advertising 
and the second half for the remainins 
80/^ — you arrive at the estimate of 
$8.7 million being invested in net and 
spot time this year. The biggest 
share of this will go to spot (which 
currently has 43 toy clients compared 
with network's 19). 

Tv's effectiveness as a sales force 
was really discovered by the small toy 
manufacturers, who invested heavily 
in money and time to develop form- 
ulas which pushed their companies to 
new sales records. But the big ones 
have now moved in en masse and are 
spending unheard-of sums for the 
toy industry. 

Ideal Toy, which three years ago 
had a total budget of $300,000, may 
well spend $1 million on tv alone next 
year. Its tv sum is currently budgeted 
at more than $500,000, which pays 
for the annual Macy's Thanksgiving 
Day Parade on 100 NBC TV stations 
(the company's fifth year of sponsor- 
ship) and for commercials in 29 
cities. Its New York City schedule, 
alone, calls for 66 one-minute an- 
nouncements weekly on a total of six 
stations. 

Mattel, which is introducing its 
own network show, Matty's Funday 
Funnies on ABC TV, has doubled its 
budget this year to a reported $800,- 
000 for tv. And Louis Marx, ventur- 
ing into television for the first time 
this year, has tagged $1 million-plus 
for tv and has picked up six network 
shows. 

Here are some of the marketing 
factors which are influencing toy 



I'lioto: c urtes.v of Toy Guidance Council 



32 




makers' choice and use of television 
advertising: 

• More than four million babies 
were born last year, annual rate is 
expected to reach six million by 1970. 

• There are more than S3 million 
youngsters in the U. S. today, all of 
them prospects for toys, playthings, 
hobbies and games. The breakdown: 
children under 1 year old — 3,796,- 
000; 1 to 2—7,872,000; 3 to 4— 
7,837,000; 5 to 9—18,287,000; 10 to 
14—15,614,000 ( figures as of 1 July 
1958 from the U. S. Dept. of Com- 
merce). 

• Toys are big business — and they 
are getting bigger. There are 3,500 
toy manufacturers — most of them 
with small shops — yet their sales at 
retail this year will be some $1,650 
billion. Observers predict this dol- 
lar figure will more than double in 
the next decade. 

• Tv's most loyal and devoted audi- 
ence is youngsters — and TvB reports 
that 99.99f of all children have access 
to a television set. In one day, the 
trade association reports, tv is 
watched by 30.9 million youngsters 
from the age of four through 11. ( For 
a detailed analysis of what children 
watch and at what hours of the day, 
see charts, pages 32, 33.) In seven 
half-hour periods of the day. the tv 
audience attracts more non-adults 
than adults ( primarily between 5 and 
6 p.m. and 7:30 and 9:30 a.m. I. 

Several basic changes are taking 
place in toy marketing patterns as a 
direct result of television's influence. 
For one thing, it's making consumers 
nmch more aware of company names. 
And industry experts think — all other 
things being equal — that customers 
will buy a product manufactured by 
I Please turn to page 54 1 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 




When children watch tv 

The chart below shows the percentage ol youngsters 
from jour through 11 years of age who are tuned to tv 
(luring any given half hour of the telecast day.* 



Percent watrh 

1 Network time, 
M-F 


intj — Day 

average day) 
Sat. 


lime 

Sun. 


(Sunday through Saturday) 

Network time, average dayi 

M-F Sat. Sun. 


7-7:30 a.m. 


3.9 


2.9 


0.2 


12:30-1 


16.9 


27.5 


23.7 


7:30-8 


8.8 


5.9 


0.9 


1-1:30 


16.5 


24.8 


23.5 


8-8:30 


15.4 


15.9 


1.7 


1:30-2 


14.4 


20.3 


20.6 


8:30-9 


17.1 


25.2 


3.7 


2-2:30 


12.3 


16.7 


17.6 


9-9:30 


22.6 


36.5 


5.6 


2:30-3 


11.4 


16.9 


19.3 


9:30-10 


19.8 


44.4 


7.1 


3-3:30 


11.5 


15.4 


17.0 


10-10:30 


16.4 


45.7 


8.7 


3:30-4 


13.3 


17.5 


18.6 


10:30-11 


15.2 


49.8 


10.8 


4-4:30 


20.0 


18.4 


21.3 


11-11:30 


15.9 


49.3 


12.5 


4:30-5 


27.2 


24.2 


23.8 


11:30-12 


17.0 


39.1 


13.8 


5-5:30 


41.6 


30.2 


28.2 


12-12:30 p.m 


. 19.3 


29.9 


19.4 


5:30-6 


51.3 


39.0 


32.3 



^Source: TvH survey, "■How to r 
''Monday tbrouirli Friday iieriods 



•acli people, '■ St'ptt'inl)*'!- ly.")*). 



Percent watching — 

6-6:30 p.m. 517 


-Nighttime 


' (Sunday 

9-9:30 


through Saturday) 

44.6 


6:30-7 


55.1 




9:30-10 




31.9 


7-7:30 


58.1 




10-10:30 




19.1 


7:30-8 


68.1 




10:30-11 




12.4 


8-8:30 


66.9 




11-11:30 




6.0 


8:30-9 


59.3 




11:30-12 




3.4 



What children like to watch 

This summary, appearing in TvB's recent survey of the 
medium's total audience, shows program preferences for 
youngsters from four through 11 years of age by net- 
work show types. ^For local type see page 54.) Figure 
indicates percentage preferring each program. 



Network programs (Sunday through Saturday) 



Daytime 



Children's Western (30 min.) 


16.7% 


Gen. drama (60 min.) 


9.6 


Misc. children's (30 min.) 


24.0 


Sit. comedy (30 min.) 


18.6 


Daytime serial (15 min.) 


4.4 


Suspense drama (30 min.) 


11.5 


Daytime serial (30 min.) 


5.2 


Suspense drama (60 min.) 


18.4 


Quiz, aud. part. (30 min.) 


5.3 


Western (30 min.) 


26.1 


Misc. adult (30 min.) 


7.0 


Western (60 min.) 


29.5 


Misc. adult (60 min. or more) 


3.7 


Gen. variety (30 min.) 


8.4 






Gen. variety (60 min.) 


14.0 


Nighttime 


Quiz. aud. part. (30 min.) 


12.2 


Adventure (30 min.) 


21.5% 


M-sc. eve. prog. (30 min.) 


9.1 


Gen. drama (30 min.) 


9.6 


Misc. eve. progs. (60 min ) 


25.2 



,i I 



33 




I 



AGENCY IN 

EXURBIA: 

THE 

HENDERSON 

OPERATION 



x 



X 



""'jiid^P*^ 




^ South of Madison Avenue— in the Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains—an adman builds a powerhouse of creativity 

^ In less than a year, Henderson Agency has picked 
up four new accounts, bills nearly $6 million in tv 



\^ oiiimuters to Madison Avenue 
who have trouble putting together a 
dream of Adman's Heaven, might try 
these specifications for size: A mod- 
ern two-story agency in the lush set- 
ting of the Piedmont at the foot of 
the Blue Ridge, where climate is tem- 
perate the year-round. Adjoining 
the agency, a swimming pool to 
which the personnel have privileges. 
Plenty of parking area, for here 
everyone drives to work I you can 
live in the country and still be home 
from the job in five minutest. Across 
the highway (attention, adgals!), a 
complete shopping center. About 12 
miles away, a new $1 million-dollar 
country club. 

The above description fits the Hen- 
derson Advertising Agency, of Green- 
ville, S. C, to a tee, so one might 
think there'd be a line of applicants 



stretching from the Biltmore Bar 
right down to South Carolina By- 
Pass 291. Yet Jim Henderson him- 
self was in New York last week set- 
ting up machinery for' the recruiting 
of 10 more personnel for tv produc- 
tion, art, copy, research, media, and 
as account execs. The agency already 
has among its key personnel, expatri- 
ates from C&W, BBDO and Y&R. 

The latest expansion in personnel 
reflects an expansion in business; in 
the past five months Henderson Ad- 
vertising has picked up four new na- 
tional accounts: 

One of these is Miles Laboratories 
for the introduction of a brand new 
product. This account was acquired 
in June. Just recently the agency was 
named to handle the textiles division 
of Dayton Rubber Co. and Her Maj- 
esty Underwear. The name of the 



fourth new account will be released 
shortly. 

Henderson Advertising Agency 
spans the era of tv; has grown along 
with it. It began in 1946, although 
the idea preceded it by three years 
when young Jim Henderson, a native 
of Atlanta who had gone to Green- 
ville, S. C. High School, and had 
studied engineering at Clemson Col- 
lege, took an aptitude test in an Army 
hospital, learned he was least-fitted to 
be an engineer, best-fitted to be an 
adman. At Clemson, while studying 
engineering, he had spent all his 
extra-curricular time running the col- 
lege radio station and newspaper. Out 
of the Army in 1943, with a new di- 
rection, he joined General Foods in 
New York, moved in his sales and 
sales promotion job to Denver, where 
he became an account executive at 
Curt Freiberger Agency and went to 
school nights at the University of 
Denver. In Denver, he graduated in 
advertising, also got married to a 
Denver girl. 

Although Greenville, S. C, had 
been his home only during his high 
school years, it had left an indelible 
impression on the mind of Jim Hen- 



34 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



(It'ison. Ill the \ears lielweeii. (rieeii- 
\ ille fiad grown up too. (Today it is 
a comiii unity of about 100,000 souls 
and is figured to be a key link in the 
cxurbia south of the Mason-Dixon 
line, a community of vast growth 
potential. ) 

Bouncy, opportunistic Henderson 
apparently spotted these possibilities 
liack in 1946. He borrowed $500 
liom his bride, and they returned 
cast to start an ad agency in one 
room of the Greenville News Build- 
ing. For five months, the Jim Hen- 
derson Agency did not have one ac- 
count. By the end of 1947. it was 
billing $25,000. Since then, it has 
Liained altitude in a fast, year-by-year 
(limb. 

Impetus that sparked the climb 
I ame in 1950. when Howard Mcln- 
l\re joined the agency as an investor 
( it was incorporated in 1953 as Hen- 



derson Advertising Agency I . Mc- 
Intyre came from Hath Packing Co. 
in Iowa where he was advertising 
manager; prior to that he had been a 
Texas agency adman. Significant was 
the fact that he was the first man to 
graduate from the Rutgers (N. J.i 
School of Sales Management. 

"Every key job-bolder at this agen- 
cy," said Henderson, "is a marketing 
man — first, last and always." 

In any agency, it would be hard to 
find a bunch of peojile more closely 
attuned to the merchandising angles 
of an ad campaign. Henderson, Mc- 
Intyre and other key executives are 
constantly hopping about the coun- 
try. They attend marketing clinics, 
management seminars, research meet- 
ings, 4A's conclaves, meetings of Na- 
tional Advertising Agency Network; 
they visit with clients, distributors, 
stations. Thev flv about in a twin- 



engine Aero-Commander for xshich 
the agenc) has a full-time jjilot. But 
once the plane comes in, there is no 
"down-time" for anyone. Between ap- 
pointments, the top brass as well as 
the |)ilot scout the local supermarkets 
and drugstores checking on the local 
market, their client products and the 
competilion. Back in the Greenville 
agency, a whole room in the new 
l)uilding has been constructed to du- 
plicate a drug chain and grocery 
store. Here, are counters crowded 
with all sorts of competitive products 
as well as their own. 

These counters give them an op- 
portunity of viewing and evaluating 
displays and labels of their own 
products in context with all rival 
products. "It also," 38-year-oId Hen- 
derson told SPONSOR, "serves as a 
constant reminder to all of us that 
we've got competition." 



A TV AGENCY: 85% of agency billings at Henderson is in air media. Here, Don Daigh, +v/radio director, previews an account's filn 







Hendersons largest account is 
Texize Chemicals, of Greenville and 
Dallas, which manufactures, along 
with its line of starches, disinfectants 
and bleaches, a cleaner which some 
Yankees refer to as "Dixie's Lestoil." 
Texize, as is true of most Henderson 
accounts, relies heavily on tv. 

Indeed, one might say that Hender- 
son Advertising is an air media agen- 
cy, for a good 85% of its estimated 
$6 million billings goes into tv and 
radio, and the lion's share of that is 
in tv. "The explanation is simple,'" 
Henderson told SPONSOR: "We re- 
gard tv as an ideal medium for pack- 
aged goods, and we regard ourselves 



as a true packaged-goods agency." 
Henderson Advertising is by no 
means a "local" agency. "We don't 
go in for local banks, retail store 
accounts or the like," says Henderson. 
"But we definitely are interested in 
regional products that have good 
growth possibilities." 

Henderson sees a trend toward 
more agencies with similar operations 
to his own — agencies located beyond 
the metro-centers such as New York, 
Chicago and San Francisco. "I be- 
lieve that within the next five years," 
Henderson told sponsor, "advertisers 
will come to realize more and more 
that not all the creativit\ is bottled 




MEDIA PLANNERS: Howard K. Mcln+yre, vice president of Henderson, and Betty McCowan, 
buyer, study an account's advertising strategy. Timebuyers here are geographical specialists 




WINNER: A pair of awards went to some of the Texize Household Cleaner tv commercials. 
Above Is one of them, known as "The Shoeshlne Boy." Texize is Henderson's top account 



up in such places as Madison Avenue. 
Already the creative people are begin- 
ing to spread out across the country. 
Many of them are looking for more 
compatible surroundings, less rare- 
fied working atmospheres than the 
concrete city canyons." Another fac- 
tor adding to expansion possibilities 
of the non-metropolis advertising 
agencies is the trend toward indus- 
trial decentralization and product di- 
versification among the advertisers 
themselves. 

"We've had a number of offers," 
said Henderson, "to sell out to or 
merge with some big New York City 
agencies. We've never considered 
one of them. 

"Our aim is to be creative right 
here where we are, and we believe 
this is a better creative atmosphere 
for our people." 

While Henderson sees greater op- 
portunities ahead for agencies in the 
smaller towns, he also points out they 
will not get very far operating as 
"small-town agencies." 

In the case of his a2enc> , Hender- 
son feels it is in a sound growth posi- 
tion now because "an advertising era 
has developed which substantiates the 
experience of the firm as more and 
more advertisers turn to the market- 
by-mar!'et concept. 

"Through our de^'eIopment of this 
approach to advertising." he said, 
"we have built up a backlog of con- 
tacts with individual station person- 
nel and representatives which has 
proved invaluable." 

During the past year the Henderson 
media and merchandising people esti- 
mate they have been visited bv more 
than 150 station salesmen and repre- 
sentatives. 

Actually the market-by-market buy- 
ing approach which today is being 
adopted bv many national advertisers 
was forced on the Henderson Agency 
early in the game. "We had no choice 
then," Henderson said, "because we 
served smaller clients who could not 
afford national coverage. I'm not 
sorry this was the case, for the experi- 
ence we built up sure comes in handy 
now." 

The agency's media buying depart- 
ment is broken up by geographical 
areas. One timebuyer buys only east 
{Please turn to page 56) 



36 



sponsor 



10 OCTOBER 19.59 






EXCITEMENT was lacking in initial co-op 
ads. Corning needed visual impact like this 



DEMONSTRATION was needed to short- 
cut in-store demonstrations, pre-sell consumer 



PRODUCTS had to be seen in action, even 
though print answered need to show color 



Corning test-markets a tv push 



•a 



^ 



regi 



Glass company used national selling strategy in 
ional markets to find most eflfective media pattern 



^ Tv will dominate $1.2 million new product push 
counter-played with co-op ads, Sunday supplements 



their own newspaper ads for the 
product simuhaneousl) . Supplements 
were used to stimulate the effect of 
national magazines. 

"The newspaper strike was on 
when we reached New York, how- 
ever, and it was then we discovered 
— like many other advertisers — that 
tv alone could send people into the 
stores after our product. So we re- 
vised our advice to retailers, suggest- 
ing instead that they wait for tv to 
take effect before running their ads. 

"The 60-second commercial we 
used in the tests was specifically de- 
signed with a twofold purpose: To 
demonstrate the product's freeze- 
cook-serve qualities and to dramatize 
the fact that the material used in 
Corning Ware is a component of 
rocket nose cones.'" 

"The New York tv test was ex- 
tremely successful." says Everson. 
"Brand recognition was strong 
enough to get our product a main- 
floor display at Gimbels — the first 
time an unknown housewares product 
has been moved off the housewares 
floor in the hisl()r\ of the store."' 



lext week, Corning Glass fires up 
a $1.2 million push for its new 
Corning Ware. Tv's slice (by SPON- 
SOR estimate) : .$580,000. 

Behind the campaign lies a full 
year of market-by-market testing by 
Corning and its agency, N. W. Ayer, 
to find just the right media pattern. 
The tests began in Philadel|)hia last 
year about this time, moved to New 
York City, and by the end of the ) ear 
had begun to reach northward and 
as far west as Harrisburg. Spot tv ex- 
penditures for these tests totaled 
$167,580 iTvB-Rorabaugh). 

"Our first efforts," says Corning 
ad manager Pete Everson, "were with 
cooperative newspaper advertising 
and Sunday supplements. But the 
story needed more dramatic em- 
phasis. Even on the limited budget 
of market-by-market introductions, 
we had to duplicate the conditions of 
a national campaign in order to make 
a dent that could be followed up with 
a national campaign later. 

"We made a 60-second commercial 
heavy on demonstration, then recom- 
mended to retailers that they run 



Market reaction was quick, Ever- 
son reports, but to get it required 
stepping up the normal buying for- 
mula which Corning and Ayer had 
worked out. The New York buying 
pattern was revised upwards to l?>Vi , 
penetration 13 times a week. Other 
large markets were adjusted accord- 
ingly as they were reached. 

In cutting back on its newspaper 
reconmiendation to retailers, hov.ever. 
Corning still chose to continue its 
use of supplements to duplicate na- 
tional magazines. "We found that 
showing the color of the product was 
a good curtain-raiser for the tv 
push," says Everson. One insertion 
in a four-week campaign was usually 
enough to relate the color 1 blue and 
white I to brand name. (See pattern 
of the national magazine schedule 
shown in the chart on next page.) 

Following last years pre-Christmas 
opening of eastern markets. Corning 
tackled the rest of the country in a 
series of spot tv campaigns which ran 
through June, at a cost (according to 
TvB-Rorabaugh) of $309,507. 

First was Florida, which opened 
in January. The Cleveland-Chicago 
areas followed in March. April found 
markets open as far west as .Missis- 
sippi. Each campaign was assembled 
along the basic pattern Corning had 
found successful: four-week cam- 
paigns beginning with a supplen;ent 
insertion, plus a four-week |)enetra- 
lion of Gr>' I . six spots per week. 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



37 



"We tackled the Southwest and Los 
Angeles in May, " says Everson. 
"using a 68' f penetration, seven 
spots per week. We soon discovered 
that Los Angeles reacted to television 
exposure faster than any eastern city 
we had tackled. Initial reaction and 
sales exceeded New York, which had 
responded with considerable speed." 

In June. Corning opened the North- 
west with the same media combina- 
tion. "By now." says Everson, "the 
blueprint for this year's national pre- 
Christnias push was clear. 

"We had learned that it took a full 
minute to tell our story, that by and 
large it should be a demonstration 
story. Having achieved national dis- 
tribution market by market, we felt 
we could buy prime time network tv 
efficiently for our minute commercial. 
This would also give us uniform pro- 



gram identification for merchan- 
dising purposes." 

Two additional commercials were 
produced. The first commercial em- 
phasized Corning Ware's freeze-cook- 
serve characteristics and nose-cone 
material. The new ones are more 
specific. In one, triple exposure 
points up the three-in-one aspect of 
the product (storage, cooking, 
serving ) . A third commercial concen- 
trates on a single product; i.e. a 
coffee pot, showing it both in use 
and on a shelf with other products 
in the line. 

Other copy points included: detach- 
able handle, "wonderful selection of 
shapes and sizes" "easiest of all to 
ivash — one glance tells you it's spot- 
less." 

The three commercials will be 
rotated in five one-hour network 



|iiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiii 

I HOW MEDIA PATTERN FITS TOGETHER I 



U S HOUSEHOLDS 
IN MILLIONS 



bU 






















-- 








4U 




















i 








JU 




















j 
1 




















































































































( 



SEPTEMBER 
21 28 



OCTOBER 

12 19 26 2 



NOVEMBER DECEMBER 

9 16 23 30 7 14 



NET TV 



SPOT TV 



MAGAZINE 



g PRE-TESTED for right combinations. Corning pattern emphasizes net tv, g 
g magazines to establish color, 4-zfee/. spot tv overlay at campaign end 1 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



shows in the following schedule: 

• ABC TV — one-sixth participa- 
tions at a time and program cost, by 
SPONSOR estimate, of $375,000 in 
Cheyenne I 26 October, 16 November, 
7 December.) The Alaskans (1, 8, 22, 
29 November ) , Bronco, alternating 
with Sugarfoot) 3, 10, 17, 24 Novem- 
ber). 

• CBS TV — two one-third partici- 
pations, at an estimated cost of $100.- 
000, in The Lineup (28 October, 11 
November I 

• NBC TV — two one-third partici- 
pations, at an estimated cost of $105,- 
000, in Five Fingers (7, 28 Novem- 
ber) . 

Spot tv is fitted into the pattern the 
third week in November, duplicating 
in the next four weeks the conditions 
of the four-week introductory cam- 
paigns of last winter and spring. The 
aim will be to reach approximately 
nine million households per week 
with spot tv as the campaign peaks 
and ends. The last week of the cam- 
paign will rely on spot tv alone. 

National magazine advertising, 
which began early, will be used to 
"punctuate" the campaign. First two- 
page spread ran in Life, 23 Septem- 
ber, another in the Saturday Evening 
Post, 3 October. A third spread will 
run in the Ladies' Home Journal the 
week of the tv kickoff, and there'll 
be one in Reader's Digest when the 
campaign peaks the last week in 
November. 

Corning feels it has come a long 
way in a short time from its early 
experiments. A consumer advertiser 
for 42 years (Pyrex glass), Corning 
has opened a national market for a 
new product by streamlining its ap- 
proach via tv. (Technicallv, the new 
product is known as Pyroceram, 
Coming's name for the material in 
Corning Ware. ) 

What's the next move? Says Ever- 
son, "Testing tv against all media 
proved that tv was the thing that was 
working for us." He indicates that 
Corning will undoubtedly return to 
its reliance on spot tv for seasonal 
promotions in its newly opened mar- 
kets, meaning, in all likelihood, heavy 
four-week pushes prior to Mother's 
Day and Easter in the first half 
of 1960. ^ 



38 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



AN IMPORTANT NEW PROFILE OF THE 

RADIO-ACTIVE HOUSEWIFE 



1 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



she listens to radio 

23 HOURS A WEEK 

Practically 1/7 
of her time 



>^llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



^ Just completed survey of 5,000 women on McCann- 
Erickson panel uncovers startling new radio facts 

^ Listening much higher than commonly realized 
and 'favorite station' gets more than 50% of total 



I he radio listening patterns of the 
American housewife are of gilt-edged 
concern to marketing men. But. in 
lr\ing to detertnine these patterns 
limebuyers have always had to dig 
for the information they needed. Un- 
til now, that is. 

Just out is a new and comprehen- 
sive survey commissioned by H-R 
Kepresentatives and done by McCann- 
Erickson's research subsidiary. Mar- 
ket Planning Corp. The findings of 
this survey, which appear on this and 
the following pages, not only reveal 



some surprising and hitherto un- 
known facts about radio, but give 
media men qualitative data on when 
the housewife listens, lion lonti she 
listens and so on. The result is a far 
clearer picture of this segment of the 
audience than has ever been available. 
Of particular significance is the 
fact that the panel of 5.000 house- 
wives used in the survey I they were 
members of MPC's permanent Market 
Planning Homemaker's Panel I repre- 
sents a cross-section of I. .S. house- 
holds in terms of income, ase of 



housewife, region, size of city, etc., 
geogra]jhically distributed across the 
countr) . It was not just a group of 
homes selected for interview. 

Among the eye-openers, these facts : 

1 he housew ife is not a dial-tw irler 
when it comes to radio. She de\elops 
strong loyalties to stations and to per- 
sonalities, whom she has come to ac- 
cept as old friends to be relied on and 
visited again. She picks one station 
as her "favorite." another, a second- 
best and sticks to them. 

The average number of hours per 
week she spends listening to radio 
( 23 as compared to 23.4 niin. per 
weekday — about 1 12 the time 
spent reading a newspa|)erl make her 
even more dominant a factor in the 
radio market. 

Of equal importance is when she 
prefers to listen. Her favorite hours 
are between 6 and 9 a.m.. between 9 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



39 



I Vc^'Vv^^^^'i-^ ^l^^,^ 




-• ^-=» 1. She 

listens to 

^TThRS. 36 MIN. 
A DAY 

(Mod. thru Fri., that is) 




2. She 
reads a 
newspaper only 

23.4 MINUTES 
A DAY 

(she's 12 times as 
interested in radio) 




5. Her favorite 
radio listening 
time is 

MON. THRU 
FRI. 6-9 a.i4 

60% of housewives Hsten 
then, 28% "most" of time) 




6. Her second 
favorite time 
is 

SAT. 6 a.m. 
12 NOON 



(but Saturday p.m. is her 
"least favorite") 





a.m. and noon. Advertisers buying 
prime afternoon driving time reach 
fewer housewives. 

These and other statistics disclosed 
by the study point up once more the 
importance of the housewife in the 
marketing picture. It was to define 
this potential for agencies, advertisers 
and the radio industry in general that 
the study was undertaken. 



To do it, Market Planning Corp., in 
consultation with the H-R research 
department, designed a detailed ques- 
tionnaire which was mailed to all 
members of the panel. Eighty per- 
cent of the women responded — a fig- 
ure considered high by statistical 
measurement. 

Results of the survey are being in- 
corporated in a two-colored, illus- 



trated brochure to be mailed to time- 
buyers, media executives and adver- 
tisers throughout the country. 

The survey's conclusions: Any day- 
time period offers a golden oppor- 
tunity for sponsors to reach and to 
sell the housewife with greater pene- 
tration and at less cost. Weekend 
tune-ins will add as much as 20% to 
the prime time housewife audience. 



40 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 




3. She listens 
to her 
favorite station 

^ HRS. 24 MIN. 
A DAY 

(more than half her 
listening) 



7. To reach 
her best, use 
these periods 

6-9 a.m. A 
9 a.m.-NOO 



i4-7 p.m. "drive period" 
not popular with her 





4. She tunes to 
her 'second best' 
\) station 

R. 19 MIN. 
A DAY 

and listens to her "third 
favorite" 53 min.) 



8. Don't neglect 
Saturday and ^'' 
Sunday ^^ 

WEEKENDS r% 
ADD 20% / ^ 




Media men who have seen the Mar- 
ket Planning Corp. survey report that 
their greatest surprise conies in tlie 
popularity of morning radio listening 
among housewives, and comparative 
unpopularity of late afternoon. 

According to the facts turned up 
by this research, a spot schedule 
slotted throughout the day from 6 
a.m. to 7 p.m. reaches 93 '/V of all 



listening housewives, but a schedule 
built around prime driving times (6 
to 9 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. I reaches 
only 73 '/r. 

Another surprise for some agency 
men is the high total of hours of 
listening to radio b) housewives. The 
McCann figures of 4 hrs. 36 min. per 
day. is considerably above the figures 
reported by Nielsen I .see sponsor's 



Air Media Basics I but it is not too far 
from radio listening figures turned 
up bv agencx surveys, notablx J\\ T 
and {]ikW "s Videotown reports. 

Of interest to radio men is the fact 
that women do more than half of 
their radio listening with the ""favor- 
ite station" while <U' J of all listening 
is shared b\ "favorite" and "next 
fa\()rite" outlets. ^ 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



41 




jM rchibald MacLeish, poet, play. 
Wright, philosopher and Pulitzer 
Prize winner, aired his views on 
broadcast media's role in a so- 
ciety moving toward freedom in 
the following statement made at 
the Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Co.'s third public service confer- 
ence in San Francisco last month. 



A POET LOOKS AT 
RADIO /TV POTENTIAL 



I B^eople in television and radio are fair game in all seasons and g 

I to any hunter — including hunters as inexperienced as myself. The J 

J reason is one you can take pride in. Your fellow citizens care g 

I about you. They may not always love you but they care. What J 

I you do matters. A man could even argue — and I should be pre- 1 

M pared to — that what you do matters more over the long run ( if 1 

I our civilization has a long run ahead of it ) than what anybody g 

g else does, because you are more persistently shaping the minds 1 

M of more people than all the rest of us put together. . . 1 

g And it is this self-evident and obvious fact which some of you = 

= seem sometimes to forget. I have read articles defending the J 

M industry against criticism of its programs by the argument that | 

M the programs objected to are "entertainment." The assumption g 

m seems to be that anything which is "entertainment" doesn't count 1 

M in the balance. . . M 

g The programs lumped together as entertainment have as great M 

I an influence on the minds of the human beings who watch them as J 

I programs which claim a more serious purpose. Indeed they have g 

I a greater influence. And not merely because they are more numer- g 

I ous but because they touch — even though they touch to numb or M 

M to paralyze — the human sensibility itself; the human imagination. . . g 

M Nothing touches the human spirit as certainly or as profoundly g 

g as works of what we call art; and bad art touches as certainly as g 

g good, though in a very different way. The current plague of g 

M westerns, for example, bad as most of them are, is having and will g 

g continue to have, an effect, a consequence. Most of these pictures g 

g are imaginatively bankrupt and they cannot help but impoverish g 

g the American imagination. = 

g To call them entertainment — a dubious claim in most cases — g 

g won't help the children whose minds are being clamped into that J 

g dead and deadening conformity of false sentiment and fake g 

g violence and the monotonous repetition of dramatic tricks. How g 

= many thousand times since "High Noon" have we heard those g 

g same sound effects, once new and vivid and imaginative, now g 

g meaningless and debasing. g 

M But the point is obvious enough without my laboring it: far g 

J {Please turn to page 58) g 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



42 



How radio 

^ National Broiler Council 
ties four products together, 
and uses subtle celebrity-sell 

^ Result: More display, 
cabinet space for chickens, 
10% boost in product sales 



I he picture on the opposite page 
shows what four advertisers can do 
when they team up. No one adver- 
tiser could have set up 30,000 dis- 
plays in supermarket aisles. But that's 
what happened when Reynolds Wrap, 
Ac'cent International, Mazola and the 
National Broiler Council got together. 

The whole project is tied to some 
mighty effective radio sell so subtle 
in its approach that the average lis- 
tener isn't even aware it's there. 
Supermarket managers and chain 
buyers across the country recognize 
it, though. They're having to give 
more counter and freezer space to 
chickens these days. 

It was to achieve exactly this that 
the National Broiler Council was 
formed three years ago. Working 
with a $300,000 budget, its agency, 
Crawford & Porter in Atlanta, puts 
packaging, merchandisability and low 
cost at the top of its advertising 
needs. For the past year, the Coun- 
cil has been alerting supermarkets to 
a series of very effective plugs done 
by well known personalities on Celeb- 
rity Talk, a five-minute program run- 
ning on 302 stations. 

The Council found it had a talking 
point with supermarket managers if 
it could get Walter Pidgeon. for in- 
stance, to swap chicken recipes with 
the show's Maggi McNeills. Arguing 
that this was not only good for chick- 
ens but for all other products men- 
tioned, the Council decided to turn 
related-item promotions into a profit- 
able science. 

Reynolds, Ac'cent and Mazola 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



got more elbo^v room for chickens 



agreed to tie into a Chick-n-Que pro- 
motion. And store managers, fa- 
miliar with what the Council was do- 
ing on radio, were receptive to sell- 
ing chicken on a grand scale. 

Mindful that related items in a 
summer food promotion extend even 
to paper plates and napkins, the four 
advertisers worked out the stack pole 
display seen below. 

The revolving mobile at the top of 
the displa\ contains the theme of the 
promotion and ke) products, but the 
display itself was designed to pack as 
many related items as possible. Basic 
design called for Reynolds and Ma- 
/.ola to be prominentlv featured in 
end stacks (note Mazola on top of 
the beer, extreme right. Reynolds 
Wrap at opposite side of the display) . 
Accent shares equal space in baskets 
below with pickles, relish and olives. 

Reynolds sales force distributed 
and set up the displays. The four ad- 
vertisers then threw the full weight of 
their respective media behind the pro- 
motion. Reynolds plugged it on its 
Walt Disney Presents tv property. 
Mazola took page insertions in Life, 
another in Saturday Evening Post, 
the Broiler Council used its radio 
show plus a full page in Reader's 
Digest. Accent, which also runs a 
schedule of glamour-coated plugs in 
Celebrity Talk, used the show plus a 
Sunday Magazine, a 31-city Sunday 
supplement. 

With chatter as the main ingredi- 
ent of the radio show, it was possible 
to work in any newsworthy item 
about the promotion. Thus, when 
Maggi McNellis had maneuvered the 
Celeste Holm interview ( by pre- 
arrangement I to Colorado Springs, it 
was a simple matter for the two of 
them to talk up the Girl Scout jam- 
boree there, mention the fact that 
the National Broiler Council had sent 
out 10,000 chickens with instructions 
for making a Chick-n-Que. To satis- 
fy her guest's curiosity on this point. 
Maggi divulged the recipe: "Sprinkle 
with Accent, brush with corn oil. 
wrap in aluminum foil. . . ." The 
|)lug was neatK wrapped u|) with an 



ecstatic. "Can't you just see 10,000 
Chick-n-Ques being prepared in 
Colorado? " 

And so it went with other guests, 
other items about the four-way pro- 
motion, and references to the related 
items. The advertisers agreed that 
to plug them all by name would rob 
the commercials of the small-talk 
quality the Council has found so ef- 
fective. As a matter of fact a direct 
mention of the Council is a great rar- 
ity in the plugs. Says the Council's 
operational manager Frank Frazer. 
"We agreed that the important thing 
was to draw attention to the promo- 
tion and let the supermarket displays 
do the rest — for us and the stores." 



A similar promotion with Rey- 
nolds, Kellogg and Pet Milk for 
"Corn-Crisped Chicken" used an iden- 
tical technique. Kellogg's Corn Flake 
Crumbs could be identified by name 
in the radio plugs I with the brand 
name omitted I . Kellogg used its 
magazine schedule; Pet Milk and 
Reynolds their network tv schedules. 
Again the Broiler Council relied on 
the radio show and a page in Read- 
er's Digest. 

Has all this increased the demand 
for chicken? "Emphatically," says 
Frazer. "In the past 12 months 
product sales for both producer and 

{Please turn to page 59) 



30,000 DISPLAYS like this promoted chicken, Reynolds Wrap, Mazola, Ac'cent. Here 
Reynolds slsmn. Tom O'Donnell (I) with a Grand Union supermarket mgr., Martin Butler 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 




How many, how much? 
CBS TV Spot answers 

^ "The Cumulative Data Finder," based on a series of 
special studies by Nielsen, is a new tool for tiniebuyers 



^%s the demand for spot tv in- 
creases, the information about the 
medium, luckily increases too. 

Latest "Handy Andy" to enter the 
field is a buyer's tool prepared by 
CBS Tv Spot Sales and based on 
a series of special studies by the A. C. 
Nielsen Co. It is called the "Cume- 
Finder" for short, or the "Cumulative 
Data Finder" for long. It incorpo- 
rates spot television measurement 
data not previously relegated to one 



Top 30 markets 
Nighttime 



Total homes 
covered 



Unduplicated homes reached in four weeks 



29,993,000 

.4% 
of U.S. 
homes 




26,993,700 



% U.S. tv homes 
reached per week 26.2 
4 weeks 47.2 



41.6 
60.7 



28,343,400 




Schedule per week 


2 SPOTS 


4 SPOTS 


6 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


2.7 


4.2 


6.0 


Weekly cost 


$26,970 


$53,940 


$80,910 



48.6 
63.7 



Top 45 markets 
Nighttimel 



Total homes 
covered 



34,933,000 



Unduplicated homes reached in four weelts 



33,011,700 




Schedule per week 


2 SPOTS 


4 SPOTS 


6 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


2.7 


4.2 


6.0 


Weekly cost 


$33,300 


$66,600 


$99,900 



% U.S. tv homes 
reached per week 
4 weeks 



30.5 
55.0 



48.4 
70.7 



56.8 
74.2 



Top 30 markets 
Daytime 



Total homes 
covered 



Unduplicated homes reached in four weeks 



29,993,000 




21,445,000 



15 296,400 

50.9% 

of homes 

„ in area » 



% U.S. tv homes 
reached per week 
4 weeks 



16.9 
34.4 



27.4 
48.2 



25,494,100 




Schedule per week 


6 SPOTS 


12 SPOTS 


24 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


3.6 


5.0 


8.5 


Weekly cost 


$19,137 


$30,168 


$56,162 



38.7 
57.3 



Total homes 
covered 



34,933.000 



Top 45 markets 
Daytime 



Unduplicated homes reached in four weeks 



% U.S. tv homes 
reached per week 
4 weeks 



19.7 
40.0 



32.0 
56.1 



26,693,100 




Schedule per week 


6 SPOTS 


12 SPOTS 


24 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


3.6 


5.0 


8.5 


Weekly cost 


$24,177 


$38,537 


$71,635 



45.1 
66.7 



44 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



place, and enables the buyer to {)r()- 
jt'ct national dimensions of what is 
■"l)asicall) considered a local adver- 
tising medium." 

It is issued as a companion piece to 
an earlier CBS self-help brochure 
titled "The Cumulative Audience." 
which presented similar data on indi- 
\ idual market buys. 

As for the "Cume-Finder," here is 
an example of how a client mav de- 
Icrmine ''how main for how much" 



— the coverage, frequency, undupli- 
cated audience and cost accumulate 
as he plans to buy from two to eight 
prime time announcements, and from 
six to 36 daytime announcements in 
the top 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 markets. 
The nighttime chart for the top 15 
tv markets shows that they contain 
about 22.873.000 tv homes (more 
than half the nation's total). If you 
buy two prime time 20-second an- 
nouncements a week on a leading sta- 



tion in each of these 15 markets they: 

• Cost $19,.520 weekly 

• Reach almost nine million different 
homes ( 20' v of li.S. totalj in a week, 
and 16 million different homes in 
four weeks 

• Are seen in the average home 1.2 
times a week 2.7 times in four weeks 

The charts below reveal some of 
the findings from this Nielsen-based 
CBSstudx. ^ 



Total homes 
covered 



38.671.000 



Top 60 markets 
Nighttime 



Unduplicated homes reached in four weeks 



% U.S. tv homes 
reactied per week 
4 weeks 



33.7 
60.8 



53.6 

78.2 



36,544,100 




Schedule per week 


2 SPOTS 


4 SPOTS 


6 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


2.7 


4.2 


6.0 


Weekly cost 


$38,910 


$77 820 


$116,730 



62.9 
82.1 



Total homes 
covered 



40,406,000 



Top 75 markets 
Nighttime 



Undurlicated homes reached in four weeks 




Schedule per week 


2 SPOTS 


4 SPOTS 


6 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


2.7 


4.2 


6.0 


Weekly cost 


$43,130 


$86,260 


$129,390 



% U.S. tv homes 

reached per week 35.2 

4 weeks 63.6 



56.0 
81.7 



65.7 
85.8 



Total homes 
covered 



38.671.000 



Top 60 markets 
Daytime 



Unduplicated homes reached in four weeks 



% U.S. tv homes 
reached per week 
4 weeks 



21.8 
44.3 



35.4 
62.1 



32.870.400 




Schedule per week 


6 SPOTS 


12 SPOTS 


24 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


3.6 


5.0 


8.5 


Weekly cost 


$28,187 


$44,912 


$83,614 



49.9 
73.9 



Total homes 
covered 



40,406,000 



Top 75 markets 
Daytime 



Unduclicated homes reached in four weeks 



% U.S. tv homes 

reached per week 

4 weeks 



22.8 
46.3 



37.0 
64.9 



34,345.100 




Schedule per week 


6 SPOTS 


12 SPOTS 


24 SPOTS 


Frequency per 
home in 4 weeks 


3.6 


5.0 


8.5 


Weekly cost 


$31,313 


$50,044 


$92,761 



52.1 
77.2 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19.59 



45 



With the growing children's market, SPONSOR ASKS; 

What are recent trends in 

kid show programing? 



Ad budgets have reached a peak 
for juvenile shows, to capitalize 
on the expanding children's popu- 
lation. Here, station men tell how 
kid programing is being reslanted 

Brooks Lindsey, co-producer and emcee 
oi Clown Carnival, JFSOC-TV, Charlotte 

We're counting on Joey! Joey is 
WSOC-TV's secret weapon in the late 
afternoon. He's a culmination of 
much of all we've learned about the 
entertaining of children — part child, 
part buffoon and part commercial 
announcer — all things to all pe ip'e 
utilizing the combined experience of 
manv men in the WSOC-TV organi- 
zation. 

As co-producer of two of channel 
9's kiddie shows each day I'd say we 
have arrived at what we feel is a 
workable system for building a kiddie 
show for any given time period. This 
we call the "controlled ad lib" show. 
While Joey the Clock is a combina- 
tion of the experience of many people, 
he also operates within the frame- 
work of the same system. (Ed. note: 
Brooks Lindsey is Joey the Clock). 

We block out our new show, noting 
the potential audience, general age of 
the average viewer, and what we 
think are the wants of this person at 
this particular time of day. For in- 
stance, our morning kiddie show is 
definitely designed with the pre- 



C are fully 
conceived with 
different age 
groups in mind 



school child in mind, but we are 
aware of the fact that sometimes 
Mother is with us. Fantasy looks 
the best bet, so we utilize a powerful 
Warners cartoon package. 

Clown Carnival in the afternoon is 
a bit more complicated, as you might 
well imagine. Here we use inore pro- 
duction such as musical transition 




from one segment to another, planned 
standard bits such as dances with the 
kids, pantomimes involving Joey, sur- 
prises on birthdays, etc. 

But even though Clown Carnival is 
designed to move at a fast pace, it is 
controlled, along with Joey, from top 
to bottom. Since we directly precede 
the news-weather block on channel 9, 
we try a gentle transition to hold 
kids, and yet interest grownups in 
staying with us. 

Of course, we talk about our "con- 
trolled ad lib" shows, but so far we've 
been unable to exercise much of this 
control on the kids in Joey's Corner. 
Joey met his match the other after- 
noon. He'd no sooner introduced a 
little guest named Linda Bridges than 
the name inspired another little 'un to 
sound off with an impromptu song- 
pun: "Under britches falling down, 
falling down, falling down . . . Under 
britches. . . ." 

What do you do if you're a clown? 
You laugh . . . while your little, shy 
world falls apart. 

Theodore N, McDowell, program 

director, WMAL-TV, Washington, D. C. 
During the past five years children 
everywhere have steadily developed a 
greater curiosity about the world in 
which they live. Five years ago chil- 
dren's programs on Washington tele- 
vision consisted largely of westerns 
and cartoons. Today this is no long- 
er true. The westerns are out of the 
children's tv picture in Washington, 
D. C. The kids still love to watch the 
cartoons but their fields of interest 
have broadened greatly. Now they 
also want to know about rockets, sat- 
ellites, space travel, zoology and ge- 
ography. W M A L - T V ' s program 
Pete and His Pals follows this trend 
toward more informative children's 
programing. It gives the kids the 
combination of information and en- 
tertainment they want. 

Pete's puppet pals are used not 
only to entertain but to provide the 
children with basic information on a 
variety of subjects. Pete's puppets 




built a miniature rocket, on-camera, 
to illustrate the basics of rocketry. | 
Then, to give the moppets an over-all | 
picture of our solar system, Pete's 
pals took a trip to the moon — beating j 
the Russians by several months. Con- 
>lru( linn of the rocket and details of 



Shows combine 
educational and 
entertainment 
values 



the space flight were carefully pre- 
sented to give the youngsters a realis- 
tic picture of space exploration. 

Pete and His Pals also gives the 
children an elementary introduction 
to geography and zoology. Pete's 
puppet characters roam the world in 
their adventures, showing pictures 
and telling the kids about the United 
States and foreign countries. Pete 
also has animal guests, both wild and 
domestic, on his show to introduce 
the children to new creatures and to 
let them enjoy, and learn more about, 
the animals with which they are al- 
ready familiar. 

Film fare for Pete and His Pals 
consists of popular cartoons, and ma- 
terial carefully chosen for both educa-' 
tional and entertainment values. 

The large volume of mail received 
by Pete and His Pals proves that the 
kids love to learn, provided the teach- 
ing is done in an interesting way. 
The mail also shows that the parents 
are enthusiastic about the new trend 
in children's programs. 

Graham Moore, director of sales, 
KSBW-TV, Salinas 
A leading show business weekly 
reported recently on the stack of 
night club bookings awaiting the ap- 
pearance of The Three Stooges. 
Their resurgent popularity is based 
almost entirely on the success of their 
old films scheduled in nominally kid 
times. And night clubs being what 



46 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



i(\ are. it is safe to assume that few 

loppets are in the audience for these 

\e appearances. 

I'erhaps this phenomenon illus- 

I rates the fact that the line between 

i id show programing and adult pro- 

raming is becoming progressive!" 

iiore faint and fuzzy. 

I had always thought of Lassie 

iiid Robin Hood as children's pro- 

ranis per se until I saw recently 

line national figures on audience 

omposition showing slightly more 

idult viewers than children. 

Of course "kid times" ain't what 
hey used to be either. Slightly modi- 
led kid shows are nudging at the 
margin of the mature show hours. 

Kellogg, for example, has slotted 
Dennis The Menace on CBS from 
7:30-8 p.m. Sunday this fall pre- 
reding Ed Sullivan — certainly a 
■family" hour as distinguished from 
one aimed at children only. 

The three half hours we carry on 
spot for Kellogg over the Gold Coast 
stations are scheduled at the agency's 
request from 6:30-7 p.m., where 
grown-ups have a chance to see them 
too, and the show's audience com- 
position figures are split almost equal- 
lly between adults and children. 

Parallel to this programing trend 
*in kid shows is a growing maturity 
: of the genre as a marketing force. 



A fuzzy- 
line between 
kid and adult 
entertainment 



Some of the highest-rated kid 
shows of past years — network and 
syndicated — failed to survive because 
they mistook the shadow of program 
popularity for the substance of sales 
impact. "Merchandising" means dif- 
ferent things to different people, but 
ideally merchandising is the link be- 
tween mass advertising and the ac- 
tual sale to the consumer. In many 
aggressive tv operations the star or 
master of ceremonies of a local kid 
show can and does motivate tre- 
mendous sales increases for his ad- 
vertisers through retail appearances, 
jobber contacts, sales meetings and 
other genuine merchandising. 
[Please turn to page 67) 

SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 




WCSH-TV 6 



NBC AfTiliate 



Portland, Maine 



HUNTLEY 

BRINKLEY 

GERA6HTY 

WHO? 



Geraghty — Larry Geraghty. He is our news 
director. His team teams with their NBC coun- 
terparts from 6:30 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. to beat 
Station "B's" news a walloping 3.6 to 1* on 
average homes reached daily. 

Yes, the good news is on "6" where you get a 
bigger more receptive audience. 

Remember, too, you save an extra 5% when 
you buy a matching spot schedule on Channel 
2 in Bangor. 



A MAINE 
BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

STATION 



'Source ARB 



WCSH-TV Portland (6) 
WLBZ-TV Bangor (2) 
WCSH Radio-Portland 
WLBZ Radio— Bangor 
WRDO Radio-Augusta 



47 



Down thru the centuries, the masks 
of comedy and tragedy have been 
portrayed in many ways — laughing 
and crying their symbolic meanings 
of man's experiences with life. 

And now the stage is set for a mid- 
twentieth-century version of these 
masks . . . the Crosley Broadcasting 
version . .• . symbolic of the WLW 
Stations' service to man in lighter 
moments and in darker hours — thru 
the modern medium of Television 
and Radio. 

This includes service in entertain- 
ment . . . education . . . religion . . . 
public interests . . . news and safety 
. . . health and medicine . . . civic, 
state, and national affairs . , . and in 
many more ways. 

In its 37 years, the Crosley Broad- 
casting Corporation has held as its 
first principle that the operation of 
a Television or Radio Station must 
go far beyond the terms of its fran- 
chise — that it must contribute maxi- 
mum service to the community in 
every possible form. 

This is our pride and our privilege 
. . . thus only — does the curtain rise. 





WLW- 1 

Television 
Indianapolis 



WLW-A 

Television 
Atlanta 



WLW-D 

Television 
Doyton 

the 

dynamic 

WLW 

Stations 



WLW-C 

Television 
Columbus 



WLW-T 

Television 
Cincinnati 



Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, 
a division of >4kCO 






i'dbSi 




TELEPULSE H RATINGS: TOP SPljl 



Top 10 shows in 10 or more 
markets: 19 July-15 Aug. 1959 
TITLE, SYNDICATOR, SHOW TYPE 



Highway Patrol 

I'v (Adventure) 



Sea Hunt 

ziv (Adventure) 



Mike Hammer 

Mc* (Mystery) 



Death Valley Days 

U.S. BORAX (Western) 

U. S. Marshal 

NTA (Western) 



Rescue 8 

SCREEN GEMS (Advcnturc) 



MacKenzie's Raiders 

iiv (Adventure) 



Silent Service 

CNP (Adventure) 



National 
average 



14.2 



13.7 



13.0 



wrca-tv 
HC.'JOpm 



12.9 



11.8 



11.6 



11.4 



10.9 



Whirtybirds 

CBS ( Adventure) 



Border Patrol 

CBS (Adventure) 



State Trooper 

MCA (Adventure) 



10.9 



10.7 



7-STATION 
MARKETS 



L.A. 



14.7 



6.7 

kttv 
8:(i0pm 



9.0 

waht-tv 
lll::!Oi>iii 



5.7 

kii-a-t 
lOiSnpm 



12.7 8.2 



krca-tv 
KJiSOpm 



9.2 

irca-lv 
:ililpm 



8.7 

kioa-lv 
r :O0pni 



11.8 

wTca-tv 
l(i:;iOpin 



9.4 

,ah(-tv 
10:;illpin 



7.4 

kn-a-t\ 
7:IIOpni 



6.3 

wchs-tv 
8:()0pni 



8.2 

kttv 
8:00pm 



5-STA. 
MARKET 



Seattle 



17.5 

konnt-tv 
<; :30pm 



14.0 

king-tT 
Ii):im|im 



18.5 

king-tv 
10:i)0pm 



13.5 

kiPK-tv 
!i:Oilpin 



2.5 

ktnt-tv 
8:00pm 



21.9 

king-tv 
!i:;!Opm 



12.5 

komo-tv 
II :30pm 



3.7 

wpix-tv 
H::{Opm 



8.2 

krca-tv 
7 :O0pm 



4.2 

khj-tv 
7 :30pm 



4.2 

uahc-tv 
10:30pm 



10.7 



3.4 

wor-tv 
10:{0lpni 



1.9 

khj-tv 

8:l)0piii 



4.STATI0N MARKETS 



Chicago Detroit Minpls. St. Louis San Fran. Wash. 



11.5 14.5 13.2 13.7 9.5 

wjhk-tv kstp-tv ksd-tv kn>n-tv \Mop-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm :30pm 7:00pm 



16.2 17.5 14.5 18.5 16.5 5.5 

vvnbd-tv wjhk-tv wtcn-tv klvi-tv kr"ii-tv Hinal-tv 
i) :30pm 111:30pm :00pm SI :30pm 7:00pm 10:00pm 



10.5 2.5 

wgii-tv cklw-tv 
9:30pm 9:00pm 



9.7 10.9 12.5 

ksd-tv kron-tv wrc-lv 
10:00pm 10:30pra 10:30pm 



7.9 12.9 19.4 10.2 9.9 10.2 



wgn-tv 
9:30pm 



w\vj-tv wcco-tv kt\i-tv kpix-tv wrc-tv 
7:0llpm 9:30pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 



7.2 13.2 10.7 7.2 11.5 7.5 

whkh-tv wuj-tv kstp-tv ksd-tv kc(ni-tv wrc-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 10;30pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 



12.2 

wgn-tv 
8 :30iiin 



11.9 

wcco-tv 
7:0(lpm 



10.9 

kioii-tv 
ii:3npm 



15.3 10.5 11.9 7.9 6.2 8.9 

wnb(|-tv wxyz-tv kstp-tv ktvi-tv kpi.v-tv wt(ip-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 10:00pm 7:30pra 7:30pm 



4.5 

kt'iit-tv 
9 :30pm 



9.2 

wgn-tv 
9:00pm 



6.2 9.2 

wtfll-tv ksd-tv 
i; :00pm 10:00pm 



15.9 

winal-tv 
7:00pm 



11.7 

wgn-tv 
9:00pm 



9.9 10.2 3.4 8.9 

wtcn-tv ksd-tv kpix-tv wttg-tv 
8:30pm 10:00pm 7:30pm 7:00pm 



8.2 



8.2 

ksd-tv 
10:nOpiii 



6.9 

wrc-tv 
7:00pm 



8.7 

wgn-tv 
9 :30pin 



13.5 12.5 16.9 5.5 



kstp-tv ksd-tv kpix-ti 
9:;inpm 9 :3(lpin 7 :30i)i 



wmal-tv 
il:3npra 



Atlanta Bait. Boston Buffah 



19.5 9.8 15.5 9.9 

waga-tv wmar-tv whz-tv wgr-tv 
9:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pin 



9.5 8.3 10.5 16.5 

k\sh-tv whal-tv wlidll-tv wkhw-t 
■:00pm 111:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pni 



10.4 

vvlw-a-tv 
10:30pm 



13.5 15.5 

wnac-tv wgr-tv 
7:00pm 10:30pm 



13.9 13.8 16.2 12.9 | 



Ash-tv wjz-tv wt)z-tv wben-t\l| 
:00pm 7:30pm 10:30pm 7 :00pm fi 



17.2 7.3 15.5 6.2 i 

waga-tv whal-tv wnac-tv vvkhw-tvp 
10:30pm 10:30pm 10:3Opm 9 :30pni E 



9.5 5.5 10.2 10.3 

wsh-tv wbal-tv wnac-tv wgr-tv 
10:30lim 7:0llpm 7 :30pin 7 :llOptii 



12.2 8.5 11.2 8.9 

wsh-tv wbal-tv whdh-tv whrn i 
7:00pm 10:30pm 8:00pm 7 ;iiii -n 



7.5 

whv-a-tv 
7 :00pm 



9.5 15.7 

wbz-tv wIhii-ii 
10 :30pm 10 :i i 



15.2 

wsh-tv 
7:00pin 



13.5 

wt)z-tv 
7:00pm 



9.5 16.8 13.5 8.9 \ 

wsh-tv wjz-Iv wbz-tv wkbw-tv 
10:30|im 9:30pm 7 :0(lpm 10 :30pm I 



8.2 

wben-tv 
7 :00pin 



Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 mai 


kets 






















If You Had A Million 

MCA (Drama) 


13.3 


7.7 

uica-tv 
7:))0pm 






8.5 

wsh-tv 
10:30pm 


Casey Jones 

SCREEN GEMS (Adventupe) 


9.8 






5.5 

wgn-lv 
7 :30pm 




4.7 

wtcn-tv 
r. :00pm 


8.9 

kplr-tv 
7 :00pm 






9.2 5.9 

wbz-tv wgr-tv 
f>:13 pm ii:00pni 


Honeymooners 

CBS (Comedy) 


9.8 


2.4 

wpix-tv 
111:30pm 






8.5 

wwj-tv 
7 :00pm 


2.2 

kmsp-tv 
8 :30pm 




15.0 

kron-tv 
li :;iOpm 




15.5 

wnac-tv 
7 :30pm 


Divorce Court 

i.oiLD (Drama) 


9.7 


5.8 

kttv 
9 :00pm 


15.5 

king-tv 
9 :00i)m 


6.6 

wgn-tv 
10:0(lpm 


11.2 

wjhk-tv 
7:00pm 


3.3 

wcco-tv 
11:00pm 




14.8 

kron-tv 
6 :00pm 




10.5 

whdh-tv 
10:00pm 


Cray Chost 

CBS (Adventure) 


9.4 








6.2 

wxyz-tv 
11:00pm 






3.5 

kgo-tv 

10:00pm 


8.5 

wrc-tv 
7:llOpm 




Badge 714 

CNP (Mystery) 


9.3 




3.9 

ktnl-tv 
9:ll0i)m 


3.5 

wnh(i-tv 
10:00pm 




10.7 

kstp-tv 
10:30pm 






9.5 

wttg-tv 
7:30pm 


8.3 

wraar-tv 
6:30 pm 


1 Search for Adventure 

BAGNALL (Adventure) 


9.3 


3.4 

kc"p-tv 
7:00pm 




6.5 

wttg-tv 
T :30pm 


7.3 

wmar-tv 
fi :30pm 


Cannon Ball 

iTc (Drama) 


9.2 


2.9 

khj-tv 
7 :30pm 


18.5 

komo-tv 
7 :00pm 






4.2 

uton-tv 
1) :00pm 






6.2 

wtop-tv 
7:00pm 




Ten Four 

zjv (Adventure) 


9.2 




10.2 

knino-tv 
ICIillpiIl 


5.5 

wgn-tv 
8 :30pm 


9.5 

wjhk-tv 
7 :00pra 


10.0 

kstp-tv 
10:30pm 






8.2 

wtop-tv 
7 :00pm 


5.5 

wlw-a-tv 
7:00pm 


Count of Monte Cristo 

ITC (Adventure) 


9.1 






3.7 

whkh-tv 
11 :3npn 






9.2 

ktvi-tv 
9 :00pm 


5.3 

ktvu-tv 
fi :30pm 







Fiimi listed ira syndicated «4 hr "A hr and hr leneth telecast in four tjr more markets. The averaee ratine is an unweithUd aTerafc of indlrtdual market ratings listed iboi 

lZ'im!^^"AlU^^T^nl-a.h^^^^ net shows are fairly stable from one tnonth to another in markets in -b.ch they are shown, tins rs tru 

lesser extent with syndicated shows. This should be borne in mind when analjralnc r.tinf trends from one month to another In this chart. Classification as to number at st 



50 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19; 



IL 


M 


s 


»H 


O' 


W 


s 


STATION MARKETS 


2-STAT 


ION MARKETS 


o\. 


Milw. 


New Or. 


Phlla. 


Birm. 


Dayton 


Prov. 


i.S 


17.5 


13.9 


12.2 


17.8 




18.3 


\l- IV 


Hlnij-lv 


HIISU-IV 


VMIV IV 


whrctv 




wjar-tv 


>Mi>ll) 


11 ::i(l|)ni 


IU:00pin 


lll:::ilpni 


li::!llliiii 




lo::!Opm 


3.2 


14.9 


19.2 


13.2 


20.3 


15.8 


16.3 




wisn-tv 


wilsu-tv 


«lil-tv 


wbrc-tv 


wlw-il-tv 


wpro-tv 




:i iOllpm 


9:30pm 


7 :llOpm 


!1 ::jOpm 


10:30pm 


7 :Onpm 






15.2 




12.8 


20.8 








\™ltv 




ivapi t\ 


»liiii-l\ 








9::)nprii 




7:IMlpm 


S::i0prn 




7.2 


15.5 




16.5 


10.3 


15.3 


13.8 


is-tv 


wisii-tv 




wrt-A -tv 


Kl)rc-tv 


wlwil-tv 


wjar-tv 


lOpm 


9 :30pm 




7 :00pm 


10:nO|im 


7:00pm 


7 :00piii 


1.9 




15.2 


8.9 


13.3 


14.8 


15.8 


rn-tT 




wilsu - 1 V 


ulil tv 


Hhrc- tv 


WlH.i-tV 


uprp-tv 


:30|>ii] 




10:0O|im 


0::!niim 


lll:0(lp]ii 


7:nopm 


10 :30pm 




17.9 


13.9 


12.9 


10.3 


48 


15.3 




wtmj-tv 


vvwi-tv 


UITV-tV 


uapi-tv 


»i\v-cl-tv 


wjar-tv 




8:00pm 


10:00pm 


"rOOpin 


il ::il)pm 


O:00pni 


7:IHIpm 


2.9 


15.2 


16.2 




24.8 


13.8 




ins-lv 


Hisn-lv 


WHl-tV 




uliic-tv 


"hv-d-tv 




Jtnpin 


Si.snpni 


7 ::f(lpm 




S:.'illpm 


7 :1111pm 




i 


13.9 

uisn tv 






25.3 

HhK-tV 




10.3 

ujar-lv 


I 


!l :;iOpiii 






7:00i)m 




7 :nopm 


0.5 


16.9 


12.2 




16.8 




10.3 


■> 


wimj-tv 


«clsU-tV 




\Vl)lC-tV 




\vpio-t\ 


"<»i>iii 


liMOpm 


lll:f)Opm 




1) ::tOpm 




7 :00!-,m 




12.2 


20.5 


8.9 






11.8 




«iH-C-tV 


vvui-tv 


wfil-tv 






wpiotv 


1 


7 :00pm 


9:30i)in 


lO^oiipin 






7:00pm 


>3.5 


11.9 


16.9 




16.8 


17.3 




)vn-lv 


ivtmj-iv 


\V(lSU-tV 




uapi-tv 


Hhio-lv 




|impin 


ll::^o:lnl 


H1:0npm 




0:;{llr)rn 


7:IMIpin 





12.5 

7 ;iMipin 


24.3 

«hri-tv 
i; ::iOpr.i 


17.9 

\nlsu-tv 
l!:0O|im 


16.8 

wlw-d-tv 
7:00pm 


9.5 

uicv-lv 
7 :(IOpm 


15.8 

uhio-tv 
7 :Olliim 




- 




19.5 

uh i-tv 
7 :iiOpm 


11.5 

wdsu-tv 
10:.30pm 


17.8 

whio-lv 
10:;iOpm 


13.9 

bns-tT 
^ :30pn) 


12.3 

wlw-d-tv 
7:00pMi 


12.5 10.9 

ivn tv wdsu-tv 

i'::iO|Hii 10::)npin 




n.O 13.7 

ilvn-tv Hwl tv 
'l:30pni 10;00piii 









il»6 ■ own. Pulse determine* number by me&surlng which iti- 
allj received by homes In the metropollttn «re« of a ilven mar- 
en nation Itself may be outside metmpolUan area of the ro«Hcet 



GENE AUTRY 

Stamng in 56 HOUR FEATURES 

ROY ROGERS 

Starring in 67 HOUR FEATURES 



ROOTIN' TOOTIN' RAVES: 

"Great ratings, highest in the city . . . have signed 
for five moie years." WTVM, Columbus, Georgia, 
April 6, 1959. 

"For almost two years now IfW^ ^^ ^^ 

... they have been III^^^^QL 

eminently successful." „.?. " ^fT^.^TfTs^ 

WCDA-TV, Albany-Troy. TV FILM SYNDICATION 



RECORD 




BREAKIN' 




SHARES! 




Greenville, 


% 


Spartanburg 


68.0 


Nashville 


54.6 


Fresno 


89.0 


Ft. Wayne 


59.0 


Little Rock 


56.8 


Syracuse 


55.9 


Peoria 


62.7 


Roanoke 


64.2 


Dayton 


71.8 


Kansas City 


60.0 


Columbus 


72.8 


Richmond 


48.7 


Cincinnati 


62.0 


Charlotte 


77.8 


South Bend- 


63.8 


Elkhart 




and many, many 


more! 


Source: ARB 





Cincinnati, Ohio? Bangor, Maine? 
^— Savannah, Georgia? 







NO^ THIS IS ''KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520,100 Drug Sales $ 40.355,000 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales S 299,539.000 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise S 148.789.000 

$1,761,169,000 Total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486.000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 78.5°o SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to April 1959 ARB we average 78.S°o share of audience from Sign On 

to Sign Off 7 days a week. During 361 weekly quarter hours it runs C0°o to 

100°o, and for 278 weekly quarter hours 92°o to 100°o. 



KNOE-TV 



CBS • A B C 
A James A. Noe Station 



Channel 8 Represented by 

Monroe, Louisiana H-R Television, inc. 

Photo: Forest Products Division. Olm-Msthieson Chemicsl Corp , W.'^t K^cr^■ce, Loi.is j- 



PONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19.59 



51 



RADIO BASICS /OCTOBER 



/° 



Facts & figures about radio today 



1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



49.5 
radio 
homes 



1959 1958 





48.7 
radio 
homes 



51.4 50.6 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source: A. C. Nielsen estimate, 1 Mar. each 
year, homes figures In millions. 



Am 
Fm 



Am 
Fm 



Radio station index 



End of September 1959 



stations 
on air 



CPs not 
on air 



New station New station* 
requests bids in hearing 



3,417 
646 



105 
157 



490 
62 



End of September 1958 



3.290 
561 



101 
98 



449 
39 



216 

27 



109 
30 



S:urfe: WC monthly itporls. cumiiieicial stations. '.Xiiniist each year. 



Radio set index 



Set 
location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



1959 


1958 


98,300,000 
37,900,000 

10,000,000* 


93,000,000 
36,000,000 

10,000,000* 



146,200,000 139,000,000 



Source: RAB, 1 Jan. 1959, 1 Jan. 1958, 
sets in working order. *No new information. 





Radio set sales 


index 


Type 


August 1959 August 1958 


8 Months 8 Months 
1959 1958 


Home 
Auto 


671,713 658,247 
279,427 242,915 


4,357,421 4.111,080 
3,434,345 1.839,813 


Total 

Source: Elec 
figures are fact 
RAB estimates 


951,137 901,162 

tronic industries Assn. Home figure 
ory production. These figures are of 
that 2.2 million Japanese sets were 


7,791,766 6.004,893 

s are estimated retail sales, auto 
U.S. production only. In adaltion, 
sold in U.S. during 1938. 



2. CURRENT LISTENING PATTERNS 

AVERAGE HOURS RADIO USAGE PER HOiVIE PER DAY 



«^ 


























?0 




























1 81 


1 74 


1.98 


1.93 


1.90 


1.82 


1.92 


1.85 


1.92 


1.82 


1.95 


1.87 


1.5 
1 




\ . 1 "-r 






















r\ K 


























0.0 




























JULY 


AUG. 


SEPT. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR. 


APR. 


MAY 


JUNE 



Source: A. C. Xiel^en, 19j8-.*j9. in-home listening (Kily, N. Y. time. 



52 



SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



IN MEMPHIS... 



It Takes 



AMERICA'S ONLY 50,000 WATT NEGRO RADIO STATION 



to Complete the Picture! 



40% of the Memphis 
Market is NEGRO - 
and you need only 
one medium to sell 
it- 



v^ 



X)\^ 



si 



G^O 



rMA 






rA\^® 



MEM 
MAR 

40% 



s\>' 



iV^ 



^u 



^^H 



^$0 



^/? 



fA 



WITHOUT WDIA . . . YOU'RE MISSING 40% 
OF THE MEMPHIS MARKET! 

And here's why this Is a marltef you just can't afford to miss: 

1. Negroes in the Memphis Market have totaled up yearly earnings of $616,294,100! 

2. They spend 80% of this big income on consumer goods! 

3. And before they buy, these Negroes listen — to WDIA! 

MORE THAN JUST A RADIO STATION . . . WDIA IS A POWERFUL ADVERTISING 
FORCE IN MEMPHIS AMERICA'S 10th LARGEST WHOLESALE MARKET! 

Let us send you proof of performance in your field! 

Egmont Sonderling, President 

Bert Ferguson, Exec. Vice-President 

Archie S. Grinalds, Jr., Sales Manager 

WDIA IS REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BOLLING COMPANY 



TWO MORE S0NDERLIH6 STATIONS! 



IN CHICAGO, IT'S 



IN OAKLAND, IT'S 



Featuring Chicago's greatest Negro 
air salesman . . . "Big Bill" Hill 



The only full-time Negro station serving all Negro 
communities in the San Francisco-Bay area. 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY: BERNARD HOWARD & CO.. INC. 
WEST COAST REPRESENTATIVE: B-N-B. INC. — TIME SALES 



ONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



53 



iJi 



REMEMBER! 



^XfiW' 




TALLAHASSEE 
THOMASVI LLE 




the bright spot in your 
sales picture . . . WCTV 
can make it brighter! 

With the great CBS programs, 
plus top ABC -TV shows, 
WCTV provides standout 
service to a most responsive 
market. In the entire U.S., 
Tallahassee stands fifth in re- 
tail sales per household.* 

For many leading brands, 
the Tallahassee - Thomasville 
Market deserves and gets 
strong spot schedules. A siz- 
able market - over 225,000 
families — 52 counties — effec- 
tively covered by WCTV. Get 
the complete picture from 
Blair Television Associates. 

'^Annual Survey of Buying Power, 
1959. 

WCTV 



TALLAHASSEE 



k^ilAx 



THOMASVILLE 



^<—^a John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Station 



( \ 

■ BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

%, J National Representatives 



TOY PARADE 

{Continued from page 33) 

a firm with an established reputation 
for quality and integrity in tv adver- 
tising. 

A second problem which tv is solv- 
ing concerns development of new 
products. Toys, unlike other consumer 
goods, are not test-marketed. By the 
time a pilot or working model of a 
toy is completed the manufacturer 
may have invested $40,000 in ma- 
chinery. Since machinery is the ma- 
jor expense in toy production, once 
the tooling has been completed the 
item goes on the production line. Ma- 
jor companies may have as many as 
3,000 different models in their line, 
representing a gigantic investment in 
equipment. Without product testing, 
the item has to stand on its own — 
fast — with the public. Tv bolsters 
that stand. 

The third phase of the marketing 
change taking place is a diminution 
of peaks and sales vallevs. Tradition- 
ally, most toys are sold in the pre- 
Christmas months of November and 
December. But the percentage for 
these two months has dropped from 
70'/( to 60'/^ of annual sales in recent 
years. Manufacturers now hope to 
make toy-buying a monthly rather 
than an annual or semi-annual habit. 

Toy tv techniques tend to follow 
this pattern: 



• 60-second film commercic 
which allow for demonstration 
even an intricate toy, preceded a 
followed by a live commentarv. 

• Live copy, usually delivered 
lib from copy platforms by popul 
local or network emcees who gi 
added impetus to children's inten 
with their own sanction. 

• Traditional children s shows, ^ 
though manv companies are start! 
to use so-called adult shows, parti 
ularly westerns. Martin Samitt. t 
rector of Consumer Behavior Lab 
points out that many adult prograr 
attract unusual interest from childre 

One toy spokesman, tying in wi 
this thought, points out that "eh 
dren's play is really an imitation 
adult life," and that products and ti 
tv presentation should point up tl 
adult use of the same kind of iter 

• Commercials that hit hard for a 
tion and noise. Mr. Samitt poin 
out that children respond with 
change in pace, use of other childrt 
demonstrating the product, incorp^ 
ration of such inanimate objects i 
puppets or stuffed animals. B 
youngsters like to emulate adults, an 
their ability to absorb so-tenne 
adult fare begins at a much earli( 
age than most people think, he add 

The top 10 network programs fc 
youngsters have been about the sam 



ii|||||||||||!l!llllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllliilllll 



What children watch 

in local programs^ 





Morning*- 
(weekday) 


Afternoon * 
(weekday) 


Weekend* 
f daytime) 


Early eve." 
(Sun. -Sat.) 


Late night" 
(Sun. -Sat.) 


NEWS 


4.1 


5.0 


3.9 


6.9 


1.6 


ADVENTURE 


3.1 


3.9 


10.6 


11.9 


5.0 


CHILDREN'S 


10.0 


24.8 


14.0 


21.0 


2.1 


GEN. DRAMA 


4.0 


3.9 


11.7 


7.9 


2.0 


SIT. COM. 


5.4 


7.4 


9.1 


9.2 


4.1 


WESTERN 




6.6 


10.2 


18.3 




MISC. 


3.8 


3.2 


1.7 


4.8 


0.9 


FEATURE FILM 




4.6 


10.0 


5.0 


0.8 



i^SOI'RCE: TvB sun'ey, "Hard to reach people,"' ^epteniher 19.'i9. 
*30-minute shows except for news. 
•*30-minute shows except for news, feature film. 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiK 



54 



SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 195" 




PROOF: 

In North Carolina's biggest Metropolitan market, total 
retail sales within WSJS-Television's Grade A Coverage 
area come to $1,396,079,000. Only WSJS-Television 
offers this strong signal strength in its industrially 
rich Piedmont market. 



television 
Winston-Salem / Greensboro 




CHANNEL 12 
Headley-Reed, Reps. 



PONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1939 



55 



IN SACRAMENTO 



II 



Radio 
One" 
offers you 
Triple 
Value 



J. Quality Audience 

You'll find "spending power" 
in the KCRA audience. Last 
Audience Composition 
Radiopulse for Sacramento 
shows high adult audience— 
number one in the 6 A.M. to 
12 midnight average. 

2. Volume Audience 

Sound ratings in all time 
periods that translate into 
low CPM. (Ask your Petry 
man for specific figures. ) 
Pulse Cumulative Report 
also shows KCRA with most 
iindttpUcated homes both 
daily and weekly. 

3. Real Merchandising 

A full time merchandising 
deportment with the biggest 
in-store chain tie-ins in the 
Sacramento Valley ... a 
merchandising bonus with 
provable pay off! 




for the past two seasons. 

According to the A. C. Nielsen Co., 
these 10 shows in November-Decem- 
ber of 1958 gained an average rating 
of 9.6 with an average audience com- 
position of 6.5% children. The top 
10 in January-February 1959 period, 
with an average rating rising to 10.7, 
were Fury, Circus Boy, Mighty 
Mouse, Heckle and Jeckle, Rough and 
Ready, Mickey Mouse Club. Howdy 
Doody, Robin Hood and Captain 
Kangaroo { with the weekday and the 
Saturday shows in that order). 

As time slots in, and adjacent to. 
kid shows tighten with the flood of 
toy buyers, ad pros suggest there'll 
be considerable revision in their tv 
approaches. 

There are several ways out, among 
them: moving into Saturday and Sun- 
day time periods which are still prettv 
much undeveloped; determining audi- 
ence composition for the so-called 
adult shows because many have a 
preponderance of children; being 
more specific in classifying appeals 
for different age groups so that the 
same program doesn't feature toys for 
the Romper Room set and for the 
boy of 10. 

A major problem of the industry, 
for which Ideal Toy recently found a 
solution, is merchandising a tv cam- 
paign to the retail trade. Manufac- 
turers deal with wholesalers and job- 
bers rather than with retailers, and 
retailers themselves know nothing 
about daytime tv because they're in 
their stores from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

So, Ideal last month purchased an 
hour on WOR TV, New York, from 
9 to 10 p.m. on a Sunday to showcase 
its upcoming tv effort and its mer- 
chandise via what it calls "an open 
circuit" to New York area retailers. 

They were alerted by mailings and 
invited to watch the program and 
participate in the awarding of 14 
prizes. Twelve of the 14 winners 
phoned the station within 10 minutes 
after the program ended, indicating 
to the toy firm a listenership of 86% 
of its retailers in the market. 

This new tactic, and new ones still 
to come, will enable imaginative toy 
makers to merchandise their tv adver- 
tising to retailers who hold the key 
to their sales success. There's no fran- 
chise system in the toy world; the re- 
tailer tosses all toys on the same shelf. 

The first job: sell the retailer; the 
second, sell the consumer. Tv is doing 
both. ^ 



HENDERSON AGENCY { 

(Continued from page 36) 
of the Mississippi; two others I 
west of the Mississippi. It is their i 
to be experts on their own areas. 

Other experts in the field are I 
merchandising arm of the ageiu\ 
in particular, Don Lewis, the ni(( 
merchandising man, who niakj 
periodic trips around the country. 

Merchandising, in a set-up as c 
voted to marketing as is the Hendj 
son operation, is a prime conside 
ation. "If you work with the st 
tions," says Jim Henderson, "you 
he amazed how they can stimula 
sales for you." 

The agency is a member of tl 
4A's and of the National Advertisii 
Agency Network. The latter (NAAN 
is an association of about 30 tin 
competitive independent agencies wl 
serve as each other's branch offices f 
market and product research as \m 
as service. They also are able to kec 
each other posted on tv or radi 
avails or exchange financial inform; 
tion on a confidential basis. 

One of the emphases of the Hei 
derson Agency, as has been pointe 
out, is a close merchandising rel; 
tionship with air media. The agenc 
and the more than 200 televisioj 
agencies used by its clients have es 
tablished a mutual relationship tha 
has proven beneficial time and agair 
Henderson is quick to point out thai 
the relationship is more that of part 
ners than of sellers and buyers. 

"To work with tv people," he says 
"is a real pleasure. The whole atmos 
phere of tv is conducive to success be 
cause of the aggressive, pioneerinj 
attitudes of the folks in the field." 

Henderson Advertising was createc 
on a three-fold concept: 

1. Creative ability must be para 
mount in the successful agency. 

2. The agency must have unlimite( 
knowledge of a client and his prod 
ucts. 

3. Agency personnel must live s< 
close to the client t'.at they becom< 
members of his business family. 

In Greenville, a lot of top-flight ad 
men have become members of th( 
families of business clients. There is 
for example, Fred Walker, accoun 
supervisor, who has a solid back 
ground of marketing and advertising 
in the furniture field through pre 
vious work with Sears Roebuck. Ac 
count exec Peter M. Soutter wai 
formerly a product manager witl 



56 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 195^ 




» 



Two major markets 
with one "UNIQUE 
TV station 

Take these ingredients: A maximum power TV station strategically 
located midway between Vancouver and Victoria with an unimpeded 
signal into each. Add strong, clear telecasting from a half mile high 
tower with top CBS network shows and syndicated half hours. Then 
add the fact that only one other TV station operates in the Greater 
Vancouver area and you see how KVOS-TV achieves its unique position: 
an international station rating first among TV viewers in Vancouver, 
Victoria and 5 other B.C. communities. The KVOS contour reaches 
262,000 B.C. homes plus 82,000 homes in Northwest Washington. 



TttttI 






Vancouver Offices — 1687 W. Broadway — REgent 8-5141 
Stovin-Byles Limited — Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Forjoe TV Inc. — New York. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
Art Moore and Associates — Seattle, Portland 



PONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



57 




This isn't the GREEN 
CORN DANCE . . . 

It's the GREENBACK 
DANCE . . . DRUM UP 
SALES WITH KOCO-TV 

HEAP BIG AUDIENCE PULL, THANKS 
TO ABC-TV LINE-UP AND HAVING 
OKLAHOMA'S LARGEST COVERAGE. 
NIELSON, LAST PLANTING SEASON, 
SHOWED WE SCALPED OPPOSITION 
THREE NIGHTS A WEEK. THIS HAR- 
VEST SEASON: WAMPUM! SAYS A 
SPONSOR, "WITH KOCO-TV, WE 
REALLY WOMP EM!" 



KOCO-TV 



i NNELj 

J 



OKLAHOMA CITY 

Charlie Keys, General Manager 



Lever Bros, and General Foods. J. B. 
Majette, Jr., another a.e., has worked 
with G.E.'s lamp division. George Hast- 
ings, Henderson research director, 
lists marketing analysis for a nuniher 
of firms including Kroger and Streit- 
mann Biscuit. 

Jay Cheek, a former creative group 
head at Y&R in New York, is now the 
director of Henderson copy depart- 
ment. 

Among the latest additions to Hen- 
derson is Jack Williams, who had been 
a senior vice president and chairman 
of the executive committee at C&W 
in New York. Williams had worked 
on such accounts as Folger Coffee, 
Chase Manhattan Bank. Thomas Cook 
& Son, Eskimo Pie Corp., and An- 
drew Jergens Co. Jack is now crea- 
tive director and vice president of 
Henderson. 

In Carl Spielvogel's advertising 
column in the A'.F. Times, Jack re- 
centl) had this to say about his new 
berth. "When I told Jack Cunning- 
ham and Bob Newe'l that I was leav- 
ing to go to Greenville, thev told me 
I was nuts. 

"True, I've only been down here 
since February, but I have never been 
happier. Everything is much more re- 
laxed and there is no more fear in my 
daily business life. ... I imagine my 
salary is equivalent to what I made 
in New York. For example, we have 
a maid at home for S20 a week." 

SPONSOR met Jack at the time it in- 
terviewed Jim Henderson. "I can get 
more work done in a da\ than I did 
in New York,"' says Jack, "and I can 
still get home before 6:30 p.m." 

Oh, yes — one small thing that may 
be a drawback to Greenville as an ad- 
man's heaven: Long, liquid lunches 
are pretty much out. The day is a 
long, hard job; but it ends long be- 
fore they have to turn on the office 
lights. After that you're on your own. 

To offer clients, top creative talent, 
the Henderson Agency is constantly 
scouting the advertising field for pros. 
To seek them out, the most savvy con- 
sulting services are used; to verify 
the talents of applicants, the agency 
uses personnel testing firms. 

When an exec is considered bv the 
Fenderson Agency, he and his family 
are taken down as guests and left to 
soak up the atmosphere for a week or 
so. If the wife or the breadwinner 
can't cope with evurbia. thev are 
quietly sent back to Manhattan. 

Heaven can wait. ^^ 



MacLEISH STATEMENT 

( Continued from page 42) 
more obvious to \ ou than it can In 
any of us who sit on the sideline- , 
otier gratuitous advice. The poin 
that none of us have a choice to 
or not to do, and you least of all i 
living. Every program you put m 
a doing and will have a conseqm 
whatever you may call it. It will w . 
for harm if it doesn't work for -n 

And nowhere can the harm or 
good be greater than in the area 
art and above all, perhaps, of drain: 
art. A free society lives and m 
live in and by the imagination. Fi 
dom itself is an imagined thim; . 
a vision always about to be m. 
true. To quicken the imagiiiati 
should be the great end of a six ii 
which moves toward freedom. 

And no instrument ever devis 
holds such promise for that quick( 
ing as radio and television. If I 
word, entertainment, could becoi 
a word not of defense but of purpoi 
and if that purpose could include t 
presentation of great enfranchisi 
works of human art, television ai 
radio could change the human futu 
in this country. % 




.58 



KOH O RENO 

KFBK O SACRAMENTO 

KBEE ° MODESTO 
KMJ O FRESNO 

KERN O BAKERSFIELO 

delivers more for the 

money in California's 

inland valley and 

Western Nevada 

Check Paul H. Raymer Co. for the fact 

M'CLATCHY BROADCASTS 

COMPANY SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNU 
SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 195 



YOU 
KCANT 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 

KCEN-TV 




BIG SPREAD! 

our 85 mi. "B" coverage- 
big even for Texas— gives 
you 20 more coverage 
miles in Central Texas 
than our nearest rival I 




BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

S'atioyial Representatives 



NATIONAL BROILER 

I Cunlinueil jroin pa^e 43 i 

retailer have increased lo the jjoint 
where we now estimate broiler-frjer 
sales in 1059 will he at least 10'; 
ahead of 1958." The '.58 figure: 
1.70(),00().()()() (at 21/2 pounds each). 
"Interestiiigl) enoujih," he adds, 
"this sales niovement has been most 
noticeable in the larger metropolitan 
areas and the suburban communities 
near these areas." 

Going the celebrity-sell route. 
Frazer notes, involves one big hazard: 
believability. "This holds particularly 
true," he says, "when the job youre 
doing has to be subtle and unob- 
trusive." 

That worr) is solved for Frazer 
by Trand Associates, New York pack- 
agers of the show. Producer Dudley 
Andrews merely picks a star for a 
Broiler Council pitch who would 
logically be interested in cooking. 
"Sometimes," says Andrews, "a male 
star will fill the bill more believablv 
than a female performer. Once the 
star has agreed to do the plug, " he 
explains, "in exchange for a mention 
of his or her own current play or 
movie, a logical device for getting 
into the subject is worked out." 

To date, stations have not balked at 
any traces of commerciality in five- 
minute shows, accept them on an 
open-end basis and sell 60-second 
spots in the open time. 

This has encouraged other adver- 
tisers to try the subtle approach to 
putting over their product or associa- 
tion. Associations taking this off- 
hand route to selling are Better 
Vision Institute. National Canners 
Association, Evaporated Milk Asso- 
ciation, National Red Cherry Insti- 
tute. Companies utilizing the show, 
in addition to Accent, are American 
Molasses Co.. Knox Gelatin, United 
Fruit. Nestle. 

Of the three product names. onl\ 
Nestle is seeking brand identification. 
Accent prefers a reference to sodium 
monosodium glutamate in its cam- 
paign to familiarize consumers with 
what the product does I i.e. seasons 
and tenderizes) inasmuch as it holds 
the major share of the market. Knox 
has ordered an\ inadvertent mention 
of the product name clipped out of 
the tape. In view of its dominant 
position in the market, gelatin alone 
— not the brand name — is all Knox 
wants to promote. 1^ 



^. 



^ 



IN PROVIDENCE 

WJAR is UPt 



In twenty-eight out of forty- 
nine daylight hours, 6:00 A.M. 
to 6:00 P.M., Monday through 
Friday (Pulse, March '59 vs. 
June '59) WJAR shows an 
increase. 



WJAR is 



UPt 



Twelve out of twenty traffic 
periods rated 6:30 A.M. to 9:00 
A.M., Monday through Friday 
(Pulse, March '59 vs. June '59) 
WJAR shows increases. 



WJAR is 



UPI 



Thirty-eight of the forty-nine 
daylight hour segments, 6:00 
A.M. to 6:00 P.M., Monday 
through Friday (Pulse, June '58 
vs. June '59) WJAR shows 
increases. 



WJAR is 



UPI 



In twenty-three of twenty-four 
traffic periods, 6:30-9:00 A.M., 
and 4:00-6:00 P.M., (Pulse, 
June '58 vs. June '59) WJAR 
shows increases. 



GET RESULTS ! 
BUY ADULTS! 

BUY WJAR 



NBC NEWS, 

SPORTS, 

MONITOR 




Sister station of WJAR-TV 
\ Represented proudly by Edward Petry & Co. / 



.SPONSOK 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



59 




Maurice Corken, assistant general 
manager of WHBF and WHBF-TV says: 

WHBF adheres to 
its published rates . . . 
assures advertisers of 
equal, fair treatment 

Without assuming a holier-than- 
thou altitude WHBF desires simply 
to state this fact about its business 
policy. Fair rates are maintained for 
excellent coverage of the market. 
W^HBF clients can be sure that they 
receive all WHBF broadcasting 
services at the card rate — with equal 
treatment to everyone. 

We believe that this policy fosters 
sound, productive business relation- 
ships. This factor together with the 
usual standard criteria for measur- 
ing a station's strength is why 
WHBF is selected repeatedly by 
agencies and advertisers to promote 
the sales of their products to the 
Quad-City market. Mutual respect 
and integrity contribure an extra 
measure of satisfaction to these fre- 
quent transactions with many, many 
clients. 

Aik Avery-Knotlel, or lurite to 
Maurice Corken, WHBF, Telco 
Bids;., Rock Island, III., for recom- 
mendations and availabilities . . . 
radio or television. 



STRONG & PRODUCTIVE FROM DEEP ROOTS 




WHBF 



Co«erin{Westeri Illinois- Eistern lowi . RADIO I TELEVISION 



CO 




National and regional 
in work now or recently compl 



SPOT BUYS 



RADIO BUYS 

General Foods Corp., White Plains, N. Y. : Short-term schedi 
start this month in a number of top markets for Birds Eye fro 
orange juice; daytime breaks. Buyer: Ann Purtill. Agency: Yoi 
& Rubicam. Inc., New York. 

Downyflake Foods Inc., New York: Initiating test schedules in 
markets in New England and mid-Atlantic states for its frozen w 
fles, to begin third week in October. Traffic minutes, about 10 
week per market, run for four weeks. Buyer: Jack Dickens. Agem 
Marschalk & Pratt Co., New York. 

Carreft & Co., Inc., Brooklyn: Flights start 18 October in abi 
17 mid-western and western markets for Virginia Dare wines. Eio 
week placement is for traffic and day minutes, with an average f 
quency of 75 per week per market. Buyer: Paule Shapiro. Agem 
MacManus, John & Adams, Inc., New York. 

TV BUYS 

American Motors Corp., Detroit: Going into about 70 markets i 
Rambler starting this month for four weeks. Prime 60's and frin 
60's are being placed, frequencies varying. Buyer: Betty Powe 
Agency : Geyer, Morey, Madden & Ballards, Inc., New York. 

Morton Frozen Foods, Inc., Div. of Continental Baking Co.. R> 
N. Y. : Lining up day and fringe night minutes and 20's in about . 
markets for its frozen foods. Seven-week flights start 19 Octobf 
Buyer: Stewart Hinkle. Agency: Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., Div. of Lever Bros., Hoboken: Schedul 
for its hot tea begin third week in October. Night minutes are beir 
used for five weeks in about 25 markets. Buyer: Bob Anderso 
Agency : SSCB, New York. 

National Presto Industries, Inc., Eau Claire, Wis.: Schedules > 
minutes start about mid-October for eight weeks in 14 top market: 
late October for six weeks in lesser ones. Buyer: Merle Myei 
Agency: Keyes, Madden & Jones, Chicago. 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., Louisville: Activity 
about 115 markets for Life cigarettes; starting dates vary. Schedul 
of night minutes, 20's and I.D.'s run for 52 weeks. Buyer: B 
Warner. Agency : Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

Frigidaire Div., General Motors Corp., Dayton: Flights of nigl 
time minutes are being set for its refrigerator line. Run starts thii 
week in October in about 30 markets. Buyer: Jay Walters. Agenc 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., New York. 

Tea Council of the U. S. A. Inc., New York: Kicking off its yea 
ly "Take tea and see" campaign in 18 markets this month for . 
weeks. I.D.'s are animated, average 14 per week per market. Buye 
Eloise Beatty. Agency: Leo Burnett Co., Inc., Chicago. 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19! 



IT COMMUNICATESI 



By anyone's standards, Paul Revere's midnight ride was a screaming success. The whole countryside sprang mtb" action ! 
He really communicated. Today, WOOD-TV is communicating with the same phenomenal success. Western Michigan prefers 
WOOD-TV. Better yet, WOODwatchers are WOODbuyers! Why not put your client on WOOD-TV and get a sample of that "Paul 
Revere-type" action from the WOODIanders. Just flash the signal to your Katz man — that's one lamp for AM, two for TV. 

WOOD-TV is first- morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday February '59 ARB Grand Rapids 
WOOD-AM is first- morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday April '58 Pulse Grand Rapids 



^GRANO nap > OS 



liiV-.-', 



a:-^' 



OD 



TV 



WOODIand Center, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 

WOOD-TV— NBC For Western and 
Central Michigan: Grand Rapids, 
Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon 
and Lansing. WOOD-Radio — NBC. 



Yf.*i£l'>9yy' 



1^^: 



A 



>m 



tune m 



WOOD" 



tnor' 



action/ 







X-^>v, 




Top of 

the morning 
in Kansas City 



As sure as the sun will come up in Kansas City tomorrow, 
more morning radio listeners will be tuned to KCMO-Radio 
than to any other station. 

The latest Nielsen Radio Report tells the story: Monday 
through Friday, 6:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., KCMO-Radio's 
Musical Timekeeper has Kansas City by the ears. We reach 
an average of 29,823 homes per quarter hour. That's 
3000 more than the next station. Nearly twice as many as 
the third station, and almost three times the audience 
of the fourth station. 

Naturally we say if you want to sell wide-awake Kansas 
City, it's a great day in the morning for you on 
KCMO-Radio. It's Kansas City's only 50,000-watt radio 
station. It's always a good morning to you on 
KCMO-Radio. 810 kc. CBS radio network. 






KCMO-Radio 



E. K. Hartenbower, Vice President 

and General Manager 

R. W. Evans. Station Manager 



The Tall Tower at Broadcasting House / Kansas City, Missouri 



SYRACUSE 
PHOENIX 
OMAHA 
TULSA 



WHEN 
KPHO 
WOW 
KRMG 



WHEN-TV The Katz Agency 

KPHO-TV The Katz Agency 

WOW-TV John Blair & Co. — Blair-TV 

John Blair & Co. 



Represented nationally by Katz 
Agency. Meredith stations are af- 
filiated with BETTER HOMES AND 
GARDENS and SUCCESSFUL FARM- 
ING Magazines. 



What's happening in U. S. Governmenf 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



10 OCTOBER 1959 

Omrrltht IN9 

•PONSOR 

raSUMTIOMa IMO. 



Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Commerce Committee, 
hefore he opened his tv quiz show hearings spoke ominously ahout the possibility 
of legislation to control any abuses which might be found. 

Fortunately for the peace of mind of broadcasters and sponsors who might fear that their 
program planning could be affected by such legislation, the threat appears to fall in the 
category of "legislative pujBfery." 

Harris spoke of "fraud perpetrated on the American people." The FCC already has 
power to deal with fraud. However, in the case of the quiz shows — no matter what else the 
evidence might show — it could not be established that there was any fraud in the legal 
sense. The public at large didn't stand to win or lose anything. 

The alleged fraud, if it can be proven, would consist merely of creating great public 
interest by means of an appearance of fairness in something which was allegedly not fair. 
The FCC might plead inability under present laws to touch such practices, though it is note- 
worthy that when Harris made his statement no such plea had been entered by the Commission. 

The purpose of the Harris prediction that legislation would be passed if the allegations are 
supported by evidence and if it develops that the FCC can't touch the practices under present 
law is quite simple. 

Hearings by Congressional committees are supposed to serve legislative pur- 
poses. Witnesses in previous hearings before other committees have refused to testify on the 
grounds that the hearings in question did not serve any bona fide legislative purposes. By 
setting and declaring such legislative purposes, Harris can compel witnesses to testify 
under subpeona and to answer questions they might not care to answer under oath. 

In view of the fact that very little broadcasting legislation has ever come out of the 
Harris Legislative Oversight subcommittee, or even the parent Commerce Committee, 
there is little reason to suppose that legislation will result from the current hearings. 



The Federal Bar Association heard representatives of the FCC and the Justice 
Department warn the broadcasting industry that it will be watched quite closely for 
fair treatment of political candidates. 

The warning was issued at a panel on the meaning of the new law passed by Congress late 
in the session overturning the FCC's controversial Lar Daly decision under Sec. 315 of the 
Communications Act. 

FCC commissioner Frederick W. Ford told the lawyers that this was going to be a 
tough amendment to administer because it raises more questions of interpreta- 
tion than it answers. 

Speaking for the Justice Department's antitrust division, former FCC counsel Richard 
Solomon warned that broadcasters are "on probation." and stricter political equal time 
requirements could be the result if they <lon't pass the fairness test. 

CBS vice president Richard Salant and NAB attorney Douglas Anello represented the 
industry on the panel. Anello expressed disappointment that outright repeal of Sec. 315 had 
not been considered by Congress, while Salant promised that CBS would prove to con- 
gressional doubters that the relief actually given represented a wise move. 

Both indicated that complete repeal would be the next objective. 



I r ' 



SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



63 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercial 



FILM-SCOPE 



10 OCTOBER 1959 
Ctpyrliht l»59 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



One portent of syndication's fiscal future may well be the continuing sales 
cess of o£f-network reruns as regional entries. 

Latest of the rerun series to succeed with the regional buyers is Ziv's Tombstone Territor') 
which made four multi-market deals accounting for 38 cities this past week. They are: 

• Stroh Brewing, through Zimmer, Keller & Calvert of Detroit, for 20 cities includ 
ing Detroit, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Columbus, Youngstown, Dayton, South Bend, Grand 
Rapids-Kalamazoo, Evansville and Toledo. 

• Pacific Gas & Electric, through BBDO, San Francisco, for seven markets: Bakers- 
field, Sacramento, Chico, Salinas, San Luis Obispo and Eureka. 

• Morning Milk, through Harris and Montagne, Salt Lake City, for Salt Lake, Port- 
land, Oregon and other mountain state markets. 

• Moulson Brewing, through MacLaren Adv., Montreal, for the cities of Buffalo, Bur- 
lington-Plattsburg and Watertown. 



Canadian-born Donald Coyle becomes the first chief of the newly-formed ABC 
International Division. 

His background in research and sales development will likely prove especially handy in 
exploring the foreign sales horizon. 

Note also that ABC's heavy reliance on action shows gives Coyle experience with the 
one type of program easiest to understand and follow anywhere abroad. I 

(For details, see Wrap-Up, Networks, page 68.) 



A prudent release policy on the part of many companies that syndicate feature 
films has kept a steady flow of new product coming into the market. 

Even though an end appears in sight for potential product, a survey of nine feature 
film distributors shows that more than 1,600 feature films and 500 short subjects 
were made available for the first time in the first six months of this year. 

Here is a partial listing of this recent theatrical product released: 



64 



DISTRIBUTOR 


DESCRIPTION 


QUANTITY 


SOURCE 


ABC Films 


J. Arthur Rank features 


77 


J. Arthur Rank 


Flamingo 


Critics' Award features 


60 


various foreign 




Western features 


97 


Republic, others 


Guild 


Lippert features 


131 


Lippert 


MGM-TV 


Our Gang shorts 


52 


MGM 




Passing Parade shorts 


69 


MGM 




Crime Does Not Pay shorts 


48 


MGM 


NTA 


International features 


64 


various foreign 




Pre- 1948 features 


160 


20th Century Fox 


Bernard Schubert 


Post- 1948 features 


26 


various foreign 


Screen Gems 


Three Stooges shorts 


118 


Columbia 




Hilarious 100 shorts 


100 


Columbia 




Powerhouse features 


78 


Universal, Columbia 




Sweet 65 features 


65 


Universal, Columbia 


UAA 


RKO features 


700 


RKO 




United Artists features 


163 


UA 




Children's shorts 


200 


Warner Bros. 






SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



It looks like the see-saw is swinging in favor of sponsorships and away from 
participations in syndication spending strategy for the current season. 

Among stations with fistfuls of sponsorship business is WABC-TV, New York, which 
last week pacted Budweiser on U. S. Marshal, Heublein's Maypo & Maltex on Annie Oakley, 
and got Sun Oil and Vitalis' renewal on Sea Hunt. 



Station groups are now making a bid for importance as film program produc- 
ers in addition to originators of shows they circulate via video-tape. 

Westinghouse Broadcasting, for example, is cashing in on interest in the forthcoming 
Civil War Centennial with a series of 13 films made with stop-motion and other techniques 
from original Mathew Brady photos. 

Besides prime time schedule on WBC's KPIX, San Francisco; KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh; 
WBZ-TV, Boston; KYW-TV, Cleveland, and WJZ-TV, Baltimore, the series will be syndi- 
cated to other stations as well. 

The spread of mobile video-tape equipment has already reached the point at 
which there are 15 producers operating in the field in the United States and Canada. 
Here's who's now in mobile tape operations, state-by-state: 

• California: CBS, Los Angeles; John Guedel (2 units) ; Mobile Video Tape Service; 
VTR Mobile Production (2 units). 

• Florida: WEAR-TV, Pensacola; WFLA -TV, Tampa, and Mel Wheeler, Pensacola. 

• Michigan: Giantview Television Corp., Ferndale. 

• Missouri: KYTV, Springfield, and KPLR-TV, St. Louis. 

• New Jersey: Intercontinental TV, Camden (2 units). 

• New York: NTA-Telestudios ; Sports Network (2 units), and Mobile Video Tape, Inc. 

• Canada: CHCH-TV, Hamihon, Ontario. 

Abroad, there are also two units in Manchester, England for Grandada TV. 



COMMERCIALS 



The latest Schwerin studies have come out with new finding in the areas of 
premium commercials, the use of sensory impressions, and the fixing of tags on the 
ends of commercials. 

Here's what Schwerin found: 

• Premium commercials tended to be better than or equal to non-premium types in cases 
where they were done in a serious mood ; a second premium offer rated even higher than 
the first. 

• Cosmetic commercials using physical, sensory model demonstrations were pre- 
fered in one comparison to those showing a logical, laboratory test. 

• Tag commercials for related products showed a lapse of effectiveness unless the two 
products were non-competitive and the advantages of the tag product were clearly specified. 



New York commercials produceus are continuing to merge and consolidate so 
as to leave the field to fewer and langer-sized companies. 

This past week Transfilm merged with Caravel to form the Transfilm-Caravel com- 
bine, a unit which in turn is part of Buckeye Corporation's diversified holding that include 
Flamingo and other interests outside tv. 

Caravel's role as a tv commercials pro<lucer has grown in recent seasons, and 

the company has the historic claim of having made the nation's fust tv (ommercials in ]9'.V) 
for a Bloomingdale's department store closed circuit. 

10 OCTOBER 1959 65 



I 



rn 



*§* 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admet 



W' SPONSOR HEARS 



10 OCTOBER 1959 

CMyrlfht IN* 

SPONtOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



JWT lately turned down two relatively choice pieces of business. 

The thinking that motivated the decision: The agency wants to (1) digest properly the 
accounts that have come into the shop this year and (2) protect itself against a lowering 
of the quality of its advertising. 



Even though tv stations have never had it so good in time sold, the operators 
are deeply concerned with the continuing pressure of rising costs. 

The biggest expanding bite has come from the unions, and what makes the problem 
particularly acute for station ownership is a reluctance to raise rates at this time. 



Don't let anybody tell you that a media director's personal enthusiasm for a 
medium doesn't influence in large measure the allocation of an agency's media 
billings. 

A New York agency which in recent years stood out in radio hasn't any money riding in 
that medium at present. 

An easy due: The media director who carried the torch for radio has gone 
elsewhere. 

Metropolitan Broadcasting (key stations: WNEW-AM-TV ) stock acted up last 
week and the report on the Street was that the group was about to acquire two 
more stations, one of them a tver on the westcoast. 

Responded a Metropolitan official to a query on this report: "No comment at present. 
Our policy is to say nothing until the contracts are signed." 



One of the newer reps has gone in for monthly parties of good liquor and good 
food to build up a goodwill reservoir with agency accountmen and timebuyers, 
using it at the same time as a forum for the exchange of ideas about the business. 

For the rep's visiting stationmen it's a memento: When they get back home they can 
relate how they rubbed elbows with the very people who are responsible for dishing 
out that national spot money. 

On the thesis that the time could be bought cheaper locally, the agency for a 
national beer account arranged for the client's zone manager to place the business 
on a southern station. 

Later the agency, much to its consternation, found the station (1) was operating on a 
single rate and (2) didn't pay commissions on business placed locally to any but local 
agencies. 



66 



Even though it added something to the theatrics of the program, the scripters 
of the Perry Como show's bow for Kraft indulged a little rewriting of history when 
they hailed Bing Crosby as the first host of the Kraft Music Hall. 

The facts: (1) Paul Whiteman put the Kraft Thursday hour on the air 26 June 1933; 
(2) The first big singing star was the late AI Jolson: (3) Crosby started 2 January 1936. 

Check source: A 30-year history of programs carried on national radio networks in the 
United States compiled by Harrison B. Summers of Ohio State University. 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 






WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand of 
all Indiana TV stations! 



►^ 



One hundred and eleven national 
and regional spot advertisers 
know that the Terre Haute 
market is not covered 
effectively by outside TV 





WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL lO • CBS— ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 

Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 



BIGGER 

than you think 

Hot Springs beats cities 
'vice Its size in general mer- 
^andise sales, in drug store 
flies. 

lourists and vacationers 
iwell Its population all year 
^ng , . . and spend ! Reach them 
Ver the "sell" station. Top rat- 
ngs too. 

KBHS 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 

5000 watts at 590 kc 

Rep: NY-Clark; Chicago-Sears & Ayer; 
South-Clarke Brown 




SPONSOR ASKS 

{Cotiliniicd jroiii pa^e 47) 

Corden Lawhead, iu'lional sales man- 
ager, WHBQTl, Memphis 

The most significant trend in chil- 
dren's programs seems to he the 
maimer in which the kids are watch- 
ing programs that used to he con- 
sidered "adult"' or "family." A sec- 
ondary tf-end is the converse: adults 
watchinsr kid shov\s. For instance. 



Programs thai 
are acceptable 
to all age 
groups 



the wrestling shows on tv used to he 
an exclusively adult program, but 
now youngsters make up a consider- 
able portion of the audience. 

The opposite swing of the pendu- 
lum is, of course, apparent in the 
large adult share for programs of 
the American Bandstand type. To a 
lesser extent, the adult western is an- 
other example of the attachment of 
adult audience to a program type that 
was considered "kid." 

We may draw the conclusion from 
the above that most programs on 
television are becoming acceptable 
to all age groups. Naturally, this 
would not apply to the very intellec- 
tual shows nor to the very simple kid 
participation shows. 

Another change is reflected in the 
attitude of timebuyers toward "kid"' 
adjacencies. For many years a "kid" 
adjacency was verboten unless the 
product could be eaten or torn up by 
a child — despite the high numbers, 
most buyers said it was not feasible 
to buy these times because the audi- 
ence had no monev. 

During the past year there has 
been a perceptible change in outlook 
by isolated local, regional and na- 
tional buyers and you ma) see gaso- 
line, clothing stores or automobiles 
next to or within Zesty Zeppo^s 
Animal Kingdom. 

In short, television seems to be on 
its way to the place where the ma- 
jority of its programs will be de- 
signed for the entertainment of all 
people, and where virtually any prod- 
uct mav be sold within or adjacent to 
anv show! ^ 




WMBD RADIO 

Reaches 
METRO 
PEORIA 
HOMES 

Every Week! 



m 



MORE Than Any 
Other Station! 



(Source: Pulse July, 1959 CPA Ratings) 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 




PONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



67 



NETWORKS 



NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 




"PICTURE OF PLEASURE." WMAL-TVs (Wash., D.C.) fall lineup of programs got closed- 
circuit review by members of press, food brokers, sponsors' reps and Washington, Baltimore 
agency executives. Success is apparent from smiling "Miss Picture of Pleasure" (Evelyn 
Knight), with general manager Fred S. Houwink (I), ABC TV panelist. Jack E. Leonard 




Major news events in the netwo! 
field this week centered around 
couple appointments. i 

One was the naming of S! 
Michelson as president of CI 
News and the other, of broader iii 
plications, was the designation 
Donald W. Coyle as v.p. in charj 
of the ABC International Dii 
sion, a new subsidiary of the Am( 
ican Broadcasting Co. 

Coyle, who's been in sales, out 
research, will report directly to A 
PT president Leonard Goldenson. 

The setting up of the ABC Inte 
national Division stems from inform 
tion and views gathered by Goldensi 
in his recnt trip to Australia and t 
Far East. 

Goldenson came back convino 
that the foreign end of tv often 
great opportunities and that it w 
imperative that American tv fil 
interests take aggressive steps 
break down existing barriers so as 



ON PARADE for NBC TVs "Total Tele 
sion" theme, 20-car motorcade tours midto 
New York. Driven by NBC pages, cars pi 
licized top notch talent of the current seas 




FLIPPO the Clown (WBNS-TV), Columbj 
O. looks tickled to be guest on CBS TV's Cc] 
fain Kangaroo, which saluted station's IC 
year. With him: show's Mr. Green Jee 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19;, 



Iomote a free exchange of American 
ograming abroad. 
ABC already has a small tv station 
I iterest in Australia and intends to 
iivest in stations in other countries. 
All the tv networks now have for- 
» gn subsidiaries. 

fWbut dates: Saber of London re- 

irns for its third season on NBC TV 

unday, 11 October, for Sterling 

'lug (DFS) . . . Robert Taylor stars 

I a new series on ABC TV, The 

ilcctive, Friday, 10 October, for P&G 

l')\B) . . . Biography of a Missile 

ill be the premiere broadcast in the 

.'65 Reports hour-long series, on 

:BS TV Tuesday, 27 October, for 

!.-ll & Howell (McCann) and B. F. 

uudrich iBBDOl . . . The Army-Air 

orce Academy football game at the 

I ankee Stadium in New York on Sat- 

iiilav, 31 October, will be televised 

n the Eastern regional area by NBC 

rv. 

Network radio news: A purchase. 



this week, by the Sweets Co. of Amer- 
ica I Henry Eisen ) put the SKO sign 
on Arthur Godfrey Time, CBS, for 
the next 26 weeks . . . NBC Radio n;- 
ports it closed $\ million in sales on 
30 September, ending the third quar- 
ter with a net sales total of $5 mil- 
lion. Among the major new orders: 
Socony Mobil Oil and Raybestos Divi- 
sion of Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 

Thisa 'n'' data: ABC TV this week 
unveiled its new tv studios which 
"will be able to accommodate the 
most elaborate live dramatic or musi- 
cal show a producer can conceive 
". . Kudo: William Schudt Jr., 
v.p. in charge of affiliate relations. 
CBS Radio, presented with a Gold 
Mike Award from the network for his 
30 years of service. 

Network personnel : Davidson 
Vorhes, named v.p. in charge of op- 
erations for CBS Radio . . . Ira De- 
Lumen, to Eastern sales manager for 
CBS TV Network Production Sales. 



AGENCIES 



Mort Werner, one of Pat Weav- 
er's proteges at NBC, replaces 
Pete Levathes (resigneil) as v.p. 
and dir<><"tor of Y&R's radio and 
tv <lepartments. 

Werner has been a v.p. and director 
of tv and advertising at the Kaiser 
Industries. 



If you're interested in what 
happens on Michigan Ave., you 
just can't ignore the impact of 
the Worhl Series on the Chicago 
ad world during the past week or 
so. 

The festival spirit replaced the busi- 
ness of worrying about campaigns. 

If they weren't at the ball park, 
their attention was riveted to office 
tv sets or at hotel ballroom giant 
screens where the ball park atmos- 
phere was simulated via the distribu- 
tion of hot dogs, peanuts, beer, pop- 
corn and programs. 




SHADES OF THEDA BARA! Flapper girls, 
mobster-dressed guys and first gas-driven car 
in 20's Idclced off KOCO-TV's closed circuit 
party in Okla. City for ABC TV's fall lineup 



ALL FOR ONE! 85,000 fans turned out for 
WTIX's "Appreciation Night" show at New 
Orleans beach. Scavenger hunt winners got 
invitations to party hosted by Frankie Avalon 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19.S9 





MARCONI IV, Is tag of Annpex's new tv 
camera unveiled recently at N.Y.'s Videotape 
Center. It features a bigger orthicon tube, 
lendi.Tg more life-like quality to picture 



FUSSIN' BUT NO FEUDIN' brought Cleve- 
land's friendly rivals, KYW-TV, WHK-TV to- 
gether when former station's d.j. Big Wilson 
aired show atop mobile in front of studio 




Agency appointments : Freedom- 
land, L .S.A., the new $65 million rec- 
reational center now under construc- 
tion in the Bronx, N. Y., and billing 
approximately $1 million, to Elling- 
ton & Co. . . . Four Westinghouse 
Electric Corp. divisions, from F&S&R 
to Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, 
Pittsburgh . . . Rexall Drug Stores 
of Chicagoland Association, Inc., to 
Welles-Morgan, Chicago . . . Dairy- 
pak Butter, food packaging manufac- 
turer, to Duffy, McClure & Wilder, 
Cleveland. 

New agencies: Beindorif, Bender & 
Clark, at 803 Fairway, Gary, Ind. . . . 
The Gerald F. Selinger Co., at the 
Barclay Building, Bala-Gynwyd, a 
suburb of Philadelphia. 

Thisa 'n' data: More than 500 ad 
men are scheduled to attend the 
Western regional convention of 

the 4 A's at Santa Barbara. 18-21 
October. Major speaker will be Eric 
Johnston, president of the Motion 
Picture Association of America . . . 
Kenneth Klein, formerly director of 
advertising and promotion of the 
Metropolitan Broadcasting Corp. has 



opened a firm bearing his name, in 
New York, to specialize in the crea- 
tion and production of advertising 
and sales promotion material . . . 
Kudo: Rolf Brandis, radio/tv pro- 
ducer at Edward H. Meiss & Co., Chi- 
cago, cited by the U.S. Treasury for 
outstanding public service to the U.S. 
savings bond program . . . National 
Tv Monitor has extended market 
coverage to provide continuous radio 
and tv monitoring in 165 cities. 

Ad men on the move: James J. 
Freeman, elected a senior v.p. of 
Adams & Keyes . . . Robert Laws, 
who joined Eisaman- Johns Advertis- 
ing, Hollywood, last year, elected a 
principal of the firm whose name has 
been changed to Eisaman, Johns & 
Laws . . . Harold Miller, to a v.p. at 
B&B . . . Henry See, to a v.p. at 
BBDO . . . Allan Moll, to v.p. in 
charge of the Los Angeles office of 
Frank B. Sawdon . . . Roy Danish, 
to v.p. and member of the plans board 
of the Smith/Greenland Co. . . . Paul 
Smith, to assume overall supervision 
and direction of the creative activities 
at Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Hol- 
den . . . Marvin Richfield, to media 




^'have 
you heard''.. 

"Colorful Cutie's (KQDE) 3rd in the 
billion and a half dollar Seattle 
market... ! Hooper, July- August says so!" 

". . . Cutie outrates all three 

50,000 Watt Seattle stations . . . 

has lowest cost per thousand to 

reach Seattle's 400,000 homes . . ." 

"... I gotta go . . . gotta date with FORJOE!" 

"About Cutie?" . . . "Uhhuh!" 

'I'm callin' Wally Nelskog and get on Cutie's log!" 





KQDE 



r 






Seattle 
ALpine 5-8245 



director at EWR&R . . . Thoma 
Flanagan, media director, Riedl 
Freede, New York . . . Gary Valei 
tine, to head the New Orleans oHk 
of Richard Carr & Co., San Antoni 
. . . Alfred Howard, to copy grou 
head at Grey Advertising. 



ADVERTISERS 



Armour (FCB) is market-testin; 
its new Princess Dial (Dial wit 

moisturizer added) in Columlni!' 
Ohio. 

It's using fairly substational t 
schedules. U 

^ I 

Warner-Lambert is going the way 
of the competitive giants in ill 
field, via a move, last week, tf 
coordinate the marketing an( 
advertising activities of all line: 
in its Product Division. 

Heading this separate division 
Irvin Hoff, named general product:., 
director. | 

Also appointed, four product direc 
tors: John McClellan. for Listeria 
Antiseptic and Listerine Toothpaste:| 
Paul Elliot-Smith, for Bromo-Seltzer:! 
J. E. Murray, for the Anahist line o! 
cold remedies; and John Anderson 
for foods, including Fizzies. 

Campaigns: 

• Page & Shaw Chocolates 

makes its initial entry into tv this 
week with a Fall and pre-holiday 
campaign in six markets: Detroit. 
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Columbus, Dav- 
ton and Toledo. The campaign; 10- 
second spots in the "visual squeeze" 
technique (out of Transfilm-Wylde 
Animation) for nine consecutive 
weeks during prime evening time on 
NBC and CBS affiliated stations. 

• General Foods' Jello-O divi 
sion is promoting Minute Sliced 
Potatoes, a new product, beginnins 
this week via spot tv. The GF prod- 
uct: dehydrated potato slices sold ifi 
eight-ounce packages ready for in- 
stant use. Agency: Y&R. 

They were named advertising! 
managers: Gilbert Supple, al 
Shulton, Inc. . . . James Plunkett. 

at Pittsburgh Plate Glass' Fiber Glass 
Division . . . Herbert Klauber, al 

Lanolin Plus. 

Add to personnel : Robert Young, 



70 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1955 



\ .|). at K&E, is slated to become v.p. 
charge of marketing of household 
oducts at Colgate. 



ASSOCIATIONS 



he NAB has set up two new 
?59-60 committees: 

The Radio Standards of Good Prac- 
r committee, headed by Cliflf Gill, 
resident and general manager of 
EZY. Anaheim. Cal.. and the Tv 
ilin Committee, with Joseph Floyd, 
resident of KELO-TV, Sioux Falls, 
lairman. 



lates and places : 

)-31 October: The Missouri Broad- 
asters Association meets at the 
luehlbach Hotel. Kansas City. 
-4 November: Fourth convention of 
le Broadcasters' Promotion As- 
ociation, at the Warwick Hotel in 
'hiladelphia. Robert Sarnoff. NBC 
oard chairman, will deliver the key- 
I'ote address. 

I November: Annual meeting of the 
\rizona Broadcasters Association 
I the Valley Ho Hotel, Scottsdale, 
firiz. 



rhey were elected: 

Officers of the Pittshurgh Radio 

^nd Tv Club : president. Leslie Stone, 
■f Smith, Taylor & Jenkins; v.p. in 
fharge of programs, Don loset, 
A^PIT; v.p. in charge of membership, 
erome Reeves, KDKA-TV; v.p. in 
fharge of special activities, Tom Slat- 
T, F&S&R; v.p. in charge of pub- 
licity, Fred McCormack, Ketchum, 
UacLeod & Grove; treasurer, L. H. 
jVeiplin, J. Grant Agency and secre- 
tary, Dorothea Pefferman, Gardner. 

Officers of the New England 
,Media Evaluators' Association : 
^:hairman, Jackson Parker, of James 
rhomas Chirurg Co.; and secretary- 
treasurer, Alice Liddell, K&E, Boston. 



EQUIPMENT 



Ampex will market the new Brit- 
ish-made Marconi tv camera in 
the U.S. as a companion to its 
\ ideotape tv recorder. 

The camera, designed to give a 
'new look" to tv performers and 
products, was unveiled last week dur- 



ing a press conference staged at 
Videotajjc Productions in New York. 

"Simply stated," explained Tom 
Davis, marketing manager of 
Ampex's Professional Products 
Divison, "the Mark IV, being intro- 
duced in the U.S. at this time, repre- 
sents another major electronic 'break 
through." The picture produced is 
more life-like than tv viewers are ac- 
customed to at present." 

This "new look" is the picture pro- 
duced by the Marconi's 4^4 inch 
image-Orthicon tube, the first used in 
a tv camera in the U.S. 



On the portable tv front: General 
Instrument Corp. reports the de- 
velojjment of the first tv tuner pro- 
duced in the U.S. to use transistors 

in place of tubes — and the smallest 
tv tuner ever made commercially. 

Developed initially for "the first 
truly portable tv set on the market," 
the tuner is now being released to 
the entire tv industry. 

Current projections by GIC are 
that lOO.OOO more transistorized tv 
sets will be produced in the coming 
year — with .500.000 or more in 1961- 
62. 




wotPnP 



FOR BEST COVERAGE IN THE 
NATION'S 47th TV MARKET 

(Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island — Moline, Illinois) 

A comparison of coverage of TV stations in or overlap- 
ping the Davenport — Rock Island market area as 
reported in the Nielson Coverage Service No. 3 — 
Spring, 1958. 







Monthly 


Weekly 


Circulation 


Station 


TV Homes 


Coverage 


Daytime 


Nightime 


WOC-TV 


438,480 


308,150 


263,430 


288,750 


Station A 


398,600 


278,900 


226,020 


258,860 


Station B 


340,240 


275,160 


229,710 


260,190 


Station C 


274,990 


208,300 


153,540 


191,010 


Station D 


229,260 


156,340 


127,240 


146,620 



\/V 


Col B J Palmer 
Presidcnr 

Ernest C. Sanders 


^ 


P«« Shaffer 

Sales Manager 

P.icr(. Criff.n. Woodw»rd, 
Int. Exclusive Nafiorul 
Rcprcseniaiives 


THE QU1NT,C1TIES 

DAVENPORT , ,„^,^ 
BETTENDORF ' 

ROCK ISLAND i 
MOLINE > III 
EAST MOLINE ' 


channel 



WOC-TV is No. 1 in the 
nation's Pth TV market — lead- 
ing in TV homes (438,480), 
monthly coverage and weekly 
circulation — day and night — 
as reported in the Nielson 
Coverage Service No. 3, Spring, 
1958. For further facts and lat- 
est availabilities, call your PGW 
Colonel . . . NOW! 




WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is port o^ Central 
Broadcasting Co., which also owns ond operates 
WHO TV and WHO Radio. Des Moines. Iowa 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19.59 



71 



promotions at RCA: Fred Far- 
well, to the newly-created post of 
v.p.. marketing . . . Mort Gaffin, to 

manger, special advertising and sales 
promotion programs. 



FILM 



Fresh light was thrown on the 
time period clearance problem 
last week by ITC in its study of 
time slots recently made avail- 
able for a new syndicated show. 

The show. Four Just Men, has 
gotten prime time clearances in the 
majority of its markets, according to 
ITC Syndication sales chief Hardie 
Fritberg. 

Backing up this claim was evidence 
on 11 markets where time between 
7-11 p.m. was cleared. 

Of these, one was at 7:00 p.m.. 
three at 7:30 p.m.. one at 9:00 p.m.. 
one at 9:30 p.m.. and three at 10:30 
p.m. 

In brief. 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 
p.m. times periods appeared 
most frequently among those 
markets sampled. 



Ray Ellingsen 



HOTOGRAPHY 



can give 

your 

photographic needs 

the kind of 

attention 

you like 

. . . backed by 

experience 

and artistry! 

Simply call 
DEIaware 7-7249 

or write to 

12 E. Grand Ave. 

Chicago 



Programing: Bernard L. Schubert 
will bring out a 60-minute version of 
its Mr. and Mrs. North property; 
furthermore, to prevent confusion, a 
30-minute version in syndication 
since 1954 with 57 episodes will be 
withdrawn . . . Peter De Met produc- 
tions' Major League Baseball Pre- 
sents, a series of 26 full-hour shows 
depicting the best games of the past 
season, is available in syndication 
through World-Wide Television Sales: 
its expected 30 markets will televise 
the show on tape while others will use 
film. So far the show is sold re- 
portedly in 65 markets, including 
WABC-TV, New York, in the 6-7 p.m. 
Sunday time period. 

Mobile color tape: Comedian Red 
Skelton has purchased the world's 
first video-tape facility equipped for 
both color and mobile operations. The 
unit, at a cost of S500,000, includes 
two Ampex Videotape color recorders 
and three General Electric color tv 
cameras, plus additional studio equip- 
ment for vehicular operation. 

Promotion: MCA TV Ltd. through 
Gardner agency has created an in. 
novation for trade paper advertising 
of its Paramount features. The inno- 
vation is in the use of glossy photo- 
graphs that will accommodate a two- 
color black and gold imprint litho- 
graphed on the reverse surface. 

Sales: Victory Program Sales divi- 
sion of CNP reports the following sta- 
tions have purchased The Califor- 
nians: WHNY-TV, Springfield. Mass.; 
KOOK-TV, Billings, Mont.; KOCO- 
TV, Oklahoma City. Okla.; WCIA- 
TV. Champaign. 111.; KSYD-TV. 
Wichita Falls. Tex.; WBRC-TV. Bir- 
mingham, Ala.; WABG-TV, Green- 
wood, Miss.; KFDA-TV, Amarillo. 
Tex.; WDSU-TV, New Orleans. La.; 
KLTA, Los Angeles. Calif.; KDAL- 
TV, Duluth. Minn.; KFJZ-TV, Fort 
Worth. Tex.; KRON-TV, San Fran- 
cisco. Calif.; WWJ-TV, Detroit. 
Mich.; KGUN-TV, Tuscon. Ariz., and 
WPIX. New York, N. Y. 

Commercials: Robert M. Barron 

joins the sales staff of Videotape Pro- 
ductions of New York, Inc. . . . Music 
Makers appoints Bill Schwartau as 
head of the production department 
. . . Some 150 Canadian advertising 



and television personnel are expect 
to attend the formal opening of t 
Robert Lawrence Productioi 
studios in Toronto on 13 October . 
Transfilm-Wylde Animation li 
completed for "visual squeeze" II 
for Page & Shaw chocolates throu; 
Horton, Church & Goff, Inc. of Pr()\ 
dence, R. I., for a pre-holiday cai 
paign marking this advertiser's fir 
use of tv. 

Strictly personnel : Guild Films h 
sales v.p. Marvin M. Grieve to be 

director of the company . . . Carl j 
Russell has been named region 
sales director of ITC, operating fro 
the Chicago office . . . Edward i 
Simmel has been named sales mai 
ager for Crosby/Brown Production 
which has syndication headquarte; 
in Hollywood . . . Arnold Kaufma 
joins NTA as eastern operations v. 

Trade note: The SEC has filed su 
in Federal court to enjoin Hal Roac 
and Guild Films from offering U 
sale the common stock of Guild unle; 
it is previously registered with tl 
commission. The SEC's complaii 
was that the defendants sold stoc 
since 18 September without meetin 
SEC registration standards. i 



INTERNATIONAL 



McCann-Erickson enters the Aui 
tralian market this month. 

The agency merged with Hansei 
Rubensohn of Sydney, to form Har 
sen Rubensohn -McCann Erickson 
Pty. Ltd. 

HR, one of the three largest agen 
cies in Australia, was selected b; 
McCann after a three-year survey o 
the market. 

Sim Rubensohn, founder and go\ 
erning director; John Bristow, man 
aging director and William Lockley 
general manager will continue as tb 
active management of the agency 
Also, Arthur Grimes, executive v.p 
of McCann (International) wil 
spend the next year in Australia. 

Reports from the internationa 
market : 

• West Germany: There are n( 
private-owned tv companies, onl; 
semi-state networks. Their advertis 



72 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1955 



d ng program is restricted to six min- 
t lies between 7:30 and o ]).ni. Num- 
01 jer of tv sets: 2,676.207. 

• Lebanon: Progress is being 

i nade by Lebanese tv, with both the 

'I ^""rench-English and Arabic channels 

ii| ncreasing their broadcasting hours. 

» 5onie 3,000 sets are currently in use, 

ivith, for example, eight viewers for 

;very Beirut tv home, and 15 view- 

srs per set outside Beirut. 

They were appointed: The San 

[uan office of Y&R, for P&G's Dash 
in Puerto Rico . . . Intercontinen- 
tal Services, Ltd., as exclusive ad- 
w itising reps in the U.S. for TGBOL- 
r\ . Guatemala City; the two tv sta- 
li(ins in the Netherlands West Indies; 
and Tele-Haiti, in Port-au-Prince. 
Haiti. 

>Ierged: A. C. Nielsen Co., Ltd., 

I.nulish subsidiary of Nielsen and the 
Altwood Group of Companies, 
Ltd., London, have combined their 
broadcast audience research into a 
new company rendering a single serv- 
ice covering 10 European countries. 

New branch office: Intercontinen- 
tal Services, Ltd. opened its first 
liiieign branch office, located in Mex- 
i( (I City, and headed by Fred Hofer. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Making lots of headway in the 
changing format of local radio 
stations is the run-of-schedule 
one-minute spots devoted to com- 
munity service features. 

Case in point is KDAL, Duluth. 
which reels 'em off under such cap- 
tions as Town Crier ( neighborhood 
news notes I . VIP Time i interviews 
with visiting dignitaries). KDAL 
Salutes I outstanding achievements on 
the local scene) and Work Sheet (em- 
ployment opportunities ) . 



A new listening habits study by 
RAB came up with this high- 
light: virtually every working 
housewife in the U.S. listens to 
radio during the average week. 

I he report. "Working Housewives 
and Radio" conducted for RAB by 
Pulse among workin"; housewives in 



six geographically dispersed areas, 
reveals : 

• Nine out of 10. of the 11.5 mil- 
lion working housewives, listen to ra- 
dio in a week's time. 

• Working housewives average 
more than two hours per day with 
radio. 

Business is liooming despite the 
strike: 

As has happened in other similar 
markets, the steel strike has had no 
effect on business at KDKA, Pitts- 
burgh. Station reports a sales in- 
crease of 249^ in local business and 
16/^ in national business for Septem- 
ber, 1959, compared to the like pe- 
riod, '58. 

Noted KDKA sales manager and 
assistant general manager: "We are 
in a virtual sold-out position and 
there is every indication that we will 
continue this record-setting pace in 
the last quarter of the year." 

Ideas at work: 

• "Snake pit" routine: Cap- 
ping the zany antics by d.j.'s at 
KIMN, Denver, is this latest by 
'"Pogo" Page, who's airing a mara- 
thon from the window of a down- 
town jewelry store — in the midst of 
an assortment of snakes, including 
rattlers, cotton-mouth moccasins, a 
boa-constrictor and others. Assisting 
him are two professional snake-han- 
dlers. Station estimates that more 
than 100,000 people have viewed the 
"creepy" marathon to date. 

• They believe ""Brevity is the 
soul of wit': And also the start of 
sales for KBON, Omaha salesman, 
for theyre now calling on busy cli- 
ents with three-minute egg timers. 
When the sand runs down the hour 
glass, the account executives wrap-up 
their ]jitch and leave . . . Brevity on 
the d.j. front: Paul Ruble, program 
director of WCAE, Pittsburgh, has 
come up with this idea to curb chat- 
ter and air more platter: Via a con- 
trol switch on his desk, he can turn 
on a tape which comes in over the 
announcer's talk, saying "All right, 
all right."' As an added talk-buster, 
station invited listeners to call a spe- 
cial number and repeat the silencer. 
When the d.j. hears it. he knov.s he's 
had it. 

• Conducting goodwill tours: 
This week. Bob Re\ nolds. sports di- 



I 



>.:> 




the big 
new one 
in 
ios 
angeles 





It's 50,000-watt KRLA, Modern 
Radio Los Angeles! It's new, it's 
power-packed, it's smack at 1110, 
dead center on the dial! New mil- 
lion-dollar selling personalities! 
New audience impact! Here's solid 
coverage at lowest cost! Here's 
something you can't buy anyplace 
else: a franchise in prime time on 
a 50,000-watt leader in the nation's 
number-one radio market! Buy 
KRLA Radio now! 

MODERN RADIO I LOS ANGELES 

KRLA 

I DIAL 1110 I 50.000 WATTS 



6381 Hollywood Boulevard. Ix>s AiiKeles 28 
Hollywood 2-7;!88 • Ed Schulz. General Manager 

Representee! Nationally by Donald Cooke Inc. 
New York, Chicago. San Francisco. St. I>ouis 



i 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 19.59 



7.S 



rector of WJR, Detroit, will visit 
eight of the smaller Michigan col- 
leges with the station's mobile studio 
and originate his sports program 
from those campuses to present "the 
small college story." 

• For coinmunitv betterment: 
Jonathon Kirhy. newscaster and com- 
mentator at KCBQ, San Diego, went 
to bat last week for the undernour- 
ished school children in the area. 
Single-handedly, he has raised over 
$1,000 in public contributions — a 
sum equivalent to more than 2,850 
free lunches for children from pover- 
ty-stricken homes. 

On the daflfodil side: D.j. Dennis 
James, of KISN, Portland, Ore., re- 
ports his audience is growing by 
leaps and "hounds." The reason: At 
11:10 a.m. each day he devotes 10 
seconds to serenading the canine por- 
tion of his listenership by loudlv toot- 
ing a dog whistle. 

Station purchase: WHKK. Akron, 
0.. to the Susquehanna Broadcasting 
Co. 

Thisa 'n' data: WTMA, Charles- 
ton, S. C, says that it was the only 
radio or tv station to remain on the 
air throughout Hurricane Gracie, and 
for some 24 hours, the only means 
of mass communication in the area 
. . . KICA, Clovis, N. M., interviewed 
the state's Governor in an airplane 
flying over the Curry county fair. He 
spoke to the opening day's crowd 
via the two-way broadcast facilities 
station has equipped in the plane . . . 
Another wake-up service: Jim Tate, 
morning d.j. on KJCN, Denver, has 
offered to place a "good morning" 
call to anyone desiring the service 
anytime within his broadcast hours 
of 6-9 a.m. . . . Doug Pledger, of 
KNBC, San Francisco, has won a 
$500 cash prize for doing the best 
ad-lib commercials in a nationwide 
contest sponsored by the Products Di- 
vision of Bristol-M^ers . . . Anniver- 
sary note: KXOK, St. Louis, cele- 
brating its 21st year of broadcasting. 

Station staffers: Dan Weinig, to 

general manager of WPRO. Provi- 
dence. R. 1. . . . Albert Fiala, Jr., to 
national sales manager of Intermoun- 
tain Network's Denver office and 
KIMN, Denver . . . Harold Cran- 



ton, to director of advertising and 
promotion for the Metropolitan 
Broadcasting Corp. . . . Tom Hop- 
son, to national sales service man- 
ager; Gary Arnold, to local sales 
manager and Carl Wagner, to the 
sales staff, all at WBRC, Birmingham 
. . . Ray Brown, director of station 
relations for Kenyon Brown's Tri- 
Buy California stations . . . Calvin 
Mann, station manager, KVOS, Bell- 
ingham . . . Robert Peebles, sta- 
tion manager, WROW, Albany . . . 
Elizabeth Gadbury, to executive as- 
sistant at WALT, Tampa. 

Resignations : Rudi Neubauer, 

sales manager of WMAQ, Chicago, 
retiring after 35 years in broadcast- 
ing . . . Raymond Katz, associate 
director of WMGM, New York, re- 
signed to spend full time with his 
personal management company. 



TV STATIONS 



Westinghouse plans to make the 
most of the upcoming Civil War 
Centennial: 

It has put together a 13-week se- 
ries utilizing some 3,000 authentic 
Mathew Brady photographs. The 
American Civil War will be syndi- 
cated nationally after its initial broad- 
cast on the WBC tv stations. 



Ideas at work: 

• Lights and action: WABC- 

TV, New York, kicked-off the fall 
season last week by making its debut 
on Broadway with a special remote 
show, The Most Enjoyable Sight in 
Town. Feature of the live program 
was the lighting of a spectacular sign 
36'x50' ballyhooing the station. 

• No longer for dealers only: 
Viewers saw a tv first in Houston the 
other day when KTRK-TV aired a 
30-minute program, Chevrolet Spec- 
tacular, showing the new 1960 mod- 
els. In the past, such showings were 
via closed circuit for car dealers only, 
but this year Chevrolet scheduled 
that, and similar telecasts, throughout 
the country, for the public. 

On the tv tape front: Ampex re- 
ports it had shipped 25 Videotape re- 
corders since 15 September, bring- 
ing the total of tv stations equipped 



to 142 . . . Red Skelton is now in 
the process of forming an independ- 
ent production company. He pur- 
chased, last week, mobile color tv 
tape recording facilities — a studio on 
wheels to include two Ampex color 
Videotape recorders and three G.E. 
color tv cameras — to be built at a 
cost of $500,000. 



Treasurer's report : Metropoli- 
tan Broadcasting Corp. this week 
declared a cash dividend of 15^ per ij 
share payable 30 October to share- ' 
holders of record 9 October — mark- 
ing the first dividend in the Corp.'s 
history. 

Thisa 'n' data: WABC-TV, New 

\ork, has a new daytime look: Time 
For Fun, on at 11 a.m. moves to 8:30 
a.m. and Joe Franklin s Memory Lane 
will be on a full hour, 10-11 a.m., 
Monday-Friday . . . The Pittsburgh 
Baseball Club signed a new three- 
year contract for tv and radio cover- 
age to be sponsored by the Atlantic 
Refining Co. and the Pittsburgh 
Brewing Co. . . . For the fourth 
consecutive season, Texaco is spon- 
soring the complete U. of Miami 
football schedule on WCKR . . . Five 
more tv stations have joined the As- 
sociation of Maximum Service 
Telecasters: WIIC, Pittsburgh; 
WO AY-TV, Oak Hill, W. Va.; 
WTVN, Columbus, 0.; WBRC-TV, 
Birmingham, and WTOL-TV, To- 
ledo . . . Arthur Godfrey will be 
named "Man of the Year" at Pulse's 
18th birthday celebration, 21 Octo- 
ber, at the Plaza in New York . . . 
Anniversary: George Putnam, of 
KTTV, Los Angeles, celebrating his 
25th vear as a news commentator. 



On the personnel front: Terry 
Lee, to managing director of WAGA- 
TV, Atlanta . . . Joseph Evans, Jr., 

to managing director and Lee Dol- 
nick, local sales manager. WITI-TV, 
Milwaukee . . . Paul Brissette, Jr., 
to local sales manager. WWLP-TV, 
Springfield, Mass. . . . Thomas Mc- 
Collum, manager of tv operations, 
WXEX-TV. Richmond-Petersburg . . . 
George Driscoll, engineering man- 
ager, WROC-TV, Rochester . . . Law- 
rence Rogers, president of WSAZ. 
Inc., Huntington, appointed chairman 
of the West Virginia Economic De- 
velopment Agency. ^ 



74 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 





Louis Dorfsman, director of art, adver- 
tising and promotion for CBS Radio since 
1956. has been named v. p. in charge of 
advertising, promotion and press informa- 
tion. He replaces Louis Hausman. who re- 
signed to become director of TIO. Dorfs- 
man joined CBS as a staff designer in 
1946. Since then, he has been promoted 
successively to art director for CBS Radio; 
( o-director of sales promotion and advertising; director of art, adver- 
tising and promotion; and to his most recent appointment as v.p. 

Roy Albertson, v.p. of WBNY, Buffalo, 
was elected chairman of the Association of 
Independent Metropolitan Stations (AIMS) 
at the group's meeting, two weeks ago, in 
\ew York. AIMS, formed some 12 years 
;ii;o. consists of 27 radio stations from the 
I . S., Canada and Mexico. They meet 
twice a year to exchange ideas and infor- 
mation relative to independent operation. 

The next AIMS meeting will be in Mexico City. Albertson, who be- 
came v.p. of WBNY in '52. also owns 50'/{ of KNOT, Prescott. Ariz. 

Arnold Kaufman, a senior member of the 
executive staff of RKO Teleradio Pictures. 
is joining NTA as v.p. in charge of east- 
ern operations. He will be responsible for 
all NTA business and administration in the 
east, including such company divisions as 
NTA Te!estudios. NTA Storevision and the 
broadcasting stations. Kaufman joins NTA 
following a 10-year association with RKO 
Teleradio Pictures in various high-level executive posts including 
one of the top aides to company president and chairman, T. O'Neil. 

Walter B. Lake, manager of Daren F. Mc- 

(-avren Co. s Los Angeles office, was named 

\.p. of the rep firm this week. Previously. 

he spent five years with KSDO. San Diego. 

as an account executive. Lake then moved 

111 Los Angeles where he became resident 

>ales manager for the station. He joined 

McGavren in 1956. when the firm became 

national rep for KSDO. McGavren also 

added two new account executives to the N. Y. office: Monte Lang, 

ftirmerly with Bob Dore and Ralph Conner, from the Boiling Co. 






-^o^s()H 



10 OCTOBF.R 1959 



says Ward D. Ingrim, Pres. 

KTVU 

SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND, 
CALIFORNIA 

To put real backbone in a 
station's feature film pro- 
gramming, you can't beat 
the Warner Bros, fea- 
tures. Writes Mr. Ward D. 
Ingrim : 

''We bought the bulk of the 
Worner Bros, library — over 
500 pics — before going on 
the air in March of '58. That 
was one of the big reasons we 
were able to get off to a fine 
start and make a strong and 
continuing impression in this 
four station market." 

ARB ratings tell why so 
many stations share 
KTVU-TV's enthusiasm 
for Warner Bros, features. 
The top flight Hollywood 
stars and top notch films 
swamp competition in day- 
time or nightime show- 
ings. Audiences love 'em. 
Sponsors love 'em. And 
you'll love the profits they 
produce. Call us today! 

u n o. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 

NEW YORK, 247 Park Ave., MUrray Hill 7-7800 
CHICAGO, 75 E. Wacker Dr., DEarborn 2-2030 
DAUAS, 151 1 Bryan St., Riverside 7-8553 
LOS ANGELES, 400S. Beverly Dr., CR6-5886 



/.:> 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 




Ervin F. Lyke, president and gen. manager, WVET AM and TV, Rochester, 
N. Y., speaks here to agencies and advertisers about a seldom-mentioned, but 
highly unfair, practice that arises probably through sheer carelessness. He is 
talking here about the other side of the ''multiple spot" problem, the refusal of 
agencies and advertisers to think through their obligation on product protec- 
tion. Each week, SPONSOR'S ''Seller's Viewpoint" presents a straight, honest 
talk to buyers of air media about important and mutual industry problems. 



Why the double standard? 

M he term "double standard" originated with soci- the station projectionist. Being more interested in 

ologists, and in its infancy decried the conventions paying for a blacktop at his recently-purchased sub- 

of the day which saluted the Don Juan as a spirited urban establishment, he projects away, saying noth- 

leader among men and issued the scarlet letter "A" ing. Eventually, the station manager leaves his 

to a girl with similar proclivities. country club locker room long enough to see this 

Loosely translating "double standard" into the particular spot and flies through his sound-proof 

television language of today, we find Perry Mason roof. Why? Because, in accepting this innocent lit- 

bellying up to the judge's bench with the case of the tie hitchhiker and backing it with a 10-second com- 

lusty, devil-may-care "hitchhiker" vs. that slinking mercially sponsored, shared I.D., he has unwittingly 

woman of the streets, "Miss Multiple Spot." violated a contractual provision covering multiple 

This is how it works: spotting. 

Many agencies insist upon contractual provisions The rates for announcements are intended to 

which may limit the number of products advertised cover the use of the allowable length of time by ad- 

in one program break to not more than two (the vertising on behalf of one product or service. For 

"no multiple spotting clause"). Some of these same an advertiser or an agency to submit a film contain- 

agencies, representing manufacturers with a wide ing advertising for two completely disassociated 

diversification, may funnel along a 60-second film products (disassociated except for being manufac- 

which contains 50 seconds' worth of action for the tured by the same parent company) would seem to 

company's line of automobiles and 10 seconds of me to be something less than fair play, 

commercial for the company's shoestring product. Let's limit the number of products advertised in 

With the wide diversification in the manufacturing any one program break to two, by all means, but 

fields today this example isn't too far fetched. let's also limit to one the number of products adver- { 

The first person to detect this practice is usually tised in each announcement unit. ^ 

7() SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 




in the bountiful LaKd of fkilk aiid Money. This market of ours is story- 
boolc stuff . . . scores of small cities and thousands of big dairy farms 
. . . 400,000 TV families enfoying CBS-ch. 2 television. 
So, cultivate our Farmers, and win the Game! 

* A Wisconsin farmer is distinguishable today only by his added I 




SPONSOR • 10 OCTOBER 1959 



77 




SPONSOR 



A ''State Department" for U.S. tv films 

Leonard Goldenson, president of American Broadcasting- 
Paramount Theatres, has called for the establishment by the 
tv industry of a new "foreign office" or "State Department" 
to promote the sale of U.S. tv programs abroad. 

Meanwhile, an industry committee, working toward the 
same end, has engaged William Finescriber to act as con- 
sultant in the formation of an export association. 

Trade barriers, particularly in Japan, England, the Philip- 
pines and Canada, restrict the number of U.S. shows that can 
be purchased for domestic use, or set up limitations on dollar 
exchanges which make the expansion of U.S. producers into 
foreign markets very difficult. 

Tv film men believe that American tv needs the same type 
of organization as the Motion Picture Producers Assn., headed 
by Eric Johnston, which has been largely instrumental in 
expanding the foreign market for the movie industry to the 
point where it now accounts for 50% of current revenues. 

Such an organization would function for tv as a negotiator 
with foreign governments, with the specific responsibility for 
increasing the volume of U.S. television programs pur- 
chased abroad. 

SPONSOR heartily supports this practical and realistic at- 
tempt to bring greater profits and prosperity to the U.S. tv 
program industry. We hope that tv producing firms will act 
quickly and together on this worthwhile project. 

House^vives and radio 

The story on page 39 concerns the most important and 
significant buying group in the entire U.S. population. We 
urge that you study carefully the facts uncovered in the new 
McCann-Erickson study about housewives' radio listening 
habits. 

Here at sponsor we are used to seeing dozens of surveys 
and research reports. But this one contains more eye-opening 
material on radio, and its importance in the home, than we 
have come across in many moons. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Better, easier, more 
efficient methods of coordinating spot radio/ tv 
campaigns. "One-two'" punch of these two media 
should be better understood by advertisers. 




78 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Cure for e.t.'s: Jan Stearns, media 
director for new N.Y. office of Miller. 
Mackay, Hoeck & Hartung, recalls this 
letter from a tombstone distributor 
when she was buying time for Rock 
of Ages at Cabot agency in Boston : 
"Thank you for recent shipment of 
records for Rock of Ages which I re- 
ceived two weeks ago. When I got 
them they were bent, so I put them 
under the back wheels of my truck. 
I took them out again yesterday. The\ 
are still bent. Now what do I do?' 
Might've pressed 'em between tomb- 
stones. 

Preparedness: Against the release of 
Elvis Presley from the Armed Forces, 
Grahame Richards, programing di- 
rector for The Storz Stations, has put 
in a bid for Elvis to rotate as a sort 
of roving disk jockey between all the 
Storz chain. Well, Elvis always could 
rotate. 

Clean: Lee Sand, WNTA, Newark, 
closes broadcast with, "Help keep 
Newark clean. Send your garbage to 
Camden." 

Dubious Data Dept. : In case you 
wonder where to get a list of those 
special events (ranging from Dill 
Pickle Week to Mute Your Muffler 
Month), more than 400 are cata- 
logued in an annual publication of 
the Apple Tree Press, Flint, Mich. 

Critic: Edward Fields, producer of 
custom carpeting, chides New York 
radio station WRCA for its "wall-to- 
wall music" promotion. "Today's 
'smart' people," he said, "use 'area' 
— not 'wall-to-wair rugs. If WRCA 
wants to borrow a term from the car- 
peting industry to describe its music, 
it should redesignate it as 'area 
music. 

The promoters: Things that turn 
up in the mail — From KNTV, San 
Jose, Cal., a "Kookie Comb" to mer- 
chandise 77 Sunset Strip . . . From 
KPAP, Redding, Calif., a coil spring 
proclaiming KPAP as "The Station 
with a Spring". . . From WLW Ra- 
dio, Cincinnati, a book titled, "13 
Elegant Ways to Commit Suicide" 
for admen to hand to any salesman 
who savs he has a better media buy 
than WLW. 



SPONSOR 



10 OCTOBER 1959 



WHAMM-Y- 



Look AAAhat's Happened 




Heed the Call of the New Figure! 
There's a NEAV Number Two-\VAM-E (>Vhamm-y) 5000 >V. on 1260 



Our TIME BUYER friend has had a bit of a shock. 

His ideas about the Miami radio market have been 
blasted wide open by a hard hitting, promotion and 
merchandising minded new station which in just 
seven months has roared to second place in Miami. 

Hooper says we're a dominant NUMBER TWO now 
with an average Monday through Friday 17.8 % share 
of audience (52% more audience than the #3 station). 



Pulse gives us a 12% share. G a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. And Whamm-y is NUMBER ONE 
when it comes to cost per thousand. We deliver thou- 
sands more listeners per dollar than any other station. 

So-o-o-o. MR. TIME BUYER, take a second look at the 
Miami market and you'll see WAM-E. Or have a chat 
with our National rep. Daren McGavren; our Regional 
rep, Clarke Brown, or Station Mgr.. Murry Woroner. 



WAM-E C^A/hamm-y) .... Radio Two in Miami 



VlfAM-E 

Chamber of Commerce BIdg. 

Miami, Florida 

FRanklin 3-5533 




'i 



T'T 



stars as 
Col. Frank Dawson, 

Chief of 
Law Enforcement 



SPONSORED BY 



• AMERICAN TOBACCO 

in 1 1 markets 

• HOOD DAIRY PRODUCTS 

in 6 New England States 

• SEGO MILK PRODUCTS 

in 7 Western markets 

• WIEDEMANN BREWING CO. 

in Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus 

• HOUSEHOLD FINANCE 

in Philadelphia, Albany, Schenectady 

• STANDARD OIL OF INDIANA 

in 5 Mid-Western markets 



WRCV-TV — Philadelphia 
KLZ-TV — Denver 
KSTP-TV — Minneapolis-St. Paul 
KWTV — Oklahoma City 
WXEX-TV — Richmond-Petersburg 
KSL-TV — Salt Lake City 
WTMJ-TV — Milwaukee 
WGN-TV - Chicago 
WSB-TV - Atlanta 
KIRO-TV - Seattle 
WTVJ - Miami 



and many others! 



^^iAAAAk 



A few markets still open. See the Ziv man 
in yours for complete information! 




17 OCTOBER 1989 
40^ ■ copy • 9B a y«ar 




This Gal's Loaded. ..in the Land of Milk &;l(oney! 




Have you met 

Miss Tillie Vision, 

our trade marl< 

here at WBAY? 

/jy OCT I 9, gjg 



A BOMBSHELL 

IN STORE 

FOR TV RATES? 

Newly revised CBS TV 
rate card forecasts rad- 
ical change for net- 
work spot time prices 

Page 33 

m 

Local advertiser 
takes lead in 
Pulse radio poll 

Page 36 



How to pre-sell 
radio/tv— first of 
SPONSOR series 

Page 39 



fs stacked with ammunition, 
jnnei 2 for greatest coverage 

for greatest Network . . . 
res of small cities and 
Ljsands of big dairy farms. 

1,000 Tillie Vision homes ! 




Agency men take 
a good look at 
station reps 

Page 41 ^^^ 





When KSTP-TV 
says ''go out 
and buy it" • • • 

people go out 
and buy it! 



EQ 





MINNEAPOLIS- ST. PAUL 

100,000 WATTS NBC 



REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. — A GOLD SEAL STATION 




IVHAT O IN A NUIVIdER? By itself, a number may not have much meaning. But 
jet a batch of them down on paper, and they begin to add up. The latest available ARB share- 
)f-audience figures for MEDIC and IT'S A GREAT LIFE, for instance. They just go to show that, 
stripped or once-a-week, these Victory Program Sales properties can really do a job for you, 
vherever you are. Want another good number? Try Circle 7-8300 in New York. That's VPS. 

MEDIC ■P^^HH 1^ /^V .^m IT'S A GREAT LIFE 




BtLTIMORE (4TH DUN) WJ2-TV 1:00 PM. MON.-FRI.* 



BILIIIIGS (1ST RUN) K6HL-Ty 9:00 PM, WED.* 



DETROIT (4TH RUN) WJBK-TV 7:00 PM. FRI.' 



HONOLULU (2N0 RUN) KONl-H 7:30 PM, SUN. 



LIS VEGtS (2ND RUN) KLIS-TV 3:30 PM, MON.-FRI.* 



MUM! (4TH RUN) WTVJ 1:00 PM, MON.-FRI.' 



OMAHt (2N0 RUN) KETV 4:00 PM, SUN.' 






51 % 35% 

58% 
43% 





CHICtOO (STH RUN) WNBQ 4:00 PM. MON.-FRI.' 



DHROIT (5TH RUN) WWJ-TY t:00 PM. MON.-FRI. 



HUNTIN6T0N, W. H. (2ND RUN) WStZ-TV 10:30 PM, SUN.' 



HOUSTON (3RD RUN) KHOU-IK 9:00 tM, MON.-FRI.* 



KNOtVILLE (3R0 RUN) WBIR-TV 1:00 PM. MON.-FRI. 



LOS tNBELES (4TH RUN) KtBC-TV 11:30 iM. MON.-FRI. 



PHIUDELPHIl (4TH RUN) WRCV-TV 1:00 PM, WED. 



PHILtDELPHIt (STH RUN) WFIL-TV 10:30 IM. MON.-FRI.' 



PinseUREH (3R0 RUN) KOKt-TV 9:30 tM, MON.-FRI. 



StN FRtNCISCO (4TH RUN) KRON-TV 7:30 PM, TUES. 



SPOUNE (4TH RUN) KUT-TK 12 NOON. MON.. WED.' 



TUCSON (2N0 RUN) KVOl-TV 9:00 PM, THURS.* 



W1SHIN6T0N, O.C. (4IH RUN) WRC-TV 1:00 PM, MON.-FRL' 



WICHlIt (4TN RUN) KIRD-TV 10:1S PM, TUES.' 



WICHIII FILLS (STH RUN) KSTO-Tf 4:00 PM, MON.-FRI ' 



'Top rating and share in time period. 

VICTORY PROGRAM SALES 

a division of CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
Canadian Representative: Fremantle of Canada, Ltd. 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 




with the 
BIG CHEESE in Wisconsin 

Not only % miilion people 



WEAU-TV 

EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN 




They're all tops... 



...in POPS! 

:CCA PROOFS OF 
PURCHASE) 





© Vol. 13, No. 42 • 17 OCTOBER 19S9 

SF^o M ^ n n 
tr^ ^(«^ wim ^mP ^^ r% 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Bombshell for tv rates? 

33 Those recently announced rate card revisions at CBS TV may have 
far-reaching implications for all future network and spot tv prices 

Clark Oil takes top radio award 

36 Midwest refiner's "Fizbee-Chief" spots beat out many national brands in 
new Pulse-conducted John Blair poll of "best remembered" commercials 

How to pre-sell radio/tv 

38 Beginning this issue, a series investigating the reasons behind and the 
methods of promoting an air buy to salesmen, wholesalers, retailers 

How agency people rate the reps 

41 SPONSOR questionnaire brings appraisal, criticism of station represen- 
tative services from 133 agency executives in all parts of the country 

Why Mennen picked radio for men 

44 Toiletries company put all its weight into 20-week, 75-market campaign 
for five products, picked peak male listening hours, upped sales 75% 

Tv supports Supp-hose better 

46 This hose co. found print media could not successfully promote dual 
health-fashion pitch; switch to tv proved almost immediately effective 

10 years with radio — a $4 million business 

47 How a record shop in Hollywood became as big in radio as department 
stores are in print. The method: display, reminder ads on 11 stations 



FEATURES 

78 Film-Scope 

26 49th and Madison 

54 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

S Newsmakei of the Week 
54 Picture Wrap-Up 

49 Radio Results 
86 Seller's Viewpoint 

50 Sponsor Asks 



18 Sponsor Backstage 

80 Sponsor Hears 

13 Sponsor-Scope 

88 Sponsor Speaks 

52 Spot Buys 

88 Ten-Second Spots 

22 Timebuyers 

84 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

77 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications jjjT L/ y 

Audit of Circulations Inc. Is^J^ZU 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 Cr Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772, Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave, Phone; SUperior 7-9863, Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham, Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunsel 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089, Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11. 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. S8 a year, Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries S9 ( 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c, Printed in U,S,A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N, Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published week\\ 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md, 

'©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



THE COMMERCIAL THAT MADE HISTORY 

Cato the Elder ended every speech before the Roman Senate with a "eommereial"- 
"Carthage must be destroyed." (It was.) Today's commercial is more complicated, 
but often less effective— completely overshadowed by the show. ... For sales with 
mjit, you must look upon broadcasting as a selling business. N. W. AVER & SON, INC 



[p 



The commercial is the payoff 




^iiLiMM [im"©iMm^/^® 







^Olt^C 



38 







42 


33-30: '' 


"♦O 




41 




3S'' 


46 




42 


40 


■30 -il 
36 30 37 




40 




39 


36 .. / ^' 
58 33 


4 


39 




39 







53 



49 



190 180 ^^° ! 






SI 



lAAitr 



so 



4« 



3S 



40 





39 






27 . 39 


> 

40 


39 


40 

MS 
39 


35 


M.N'IOK' 

21 ; 



42 



43 



39 




41 



Famous on the local scene . . , yet known throuehout the nation • Storer Broadcas 




113 



Steer for the channels marked for 
your success. Storer channels. 
Storer stations accent the sell. 
Promises are great but what counts 
is performance. And performance 
is a built-in feature at every Storer 
station, radio or TV. For example, 
in Detroit WJBK-TV dominates the 
market. First by far in all surveys. 
28% greater share of audience than 
any other Detroit station.* That's why, 
with Storer, you know where your 
sales are going — definitely upl 

*ARB August 




ii: 



83 



IS3 




327 



STORER 
STATIONS 

TELEVISION 

DETROIT 
WJBK-TV i 

Ch. 2 — CBS 
First by far 
in all surveys 

• 

CLEVELAND 
WJW-TV 

Top News — Top Movies 
*BS Programming. First in t 

• ; 

TOLEDO 
WSPD-TV 

First in Toledo surveys 
Covers 2,000,000 

• 

ATLANTA 
WACA-TV 

More Top Movies 
More Nev/s — More Coverc 

• 

MILWAUKEE 
WITI-TV 

CBS Programming 
Top MGM, PARA, RKO Mo 



RADIO 

PHILADELPHIA 
WIBC L-i 

50,000 Watt$ 
First in oil surveys 



DETROIT 
WJBK 

WJBK-RodioiJ Detroi 
First from noon to miOni( 

cleve'land 

WJW 

NBC network. Tops in loc 
Personality News and Mu 



WHEELING ,l[. 
WWVA \}W 

First by far 
Pittsburgh-Wheeling ore 
Only full-time CBS stati< 

• 

TOLEDO 
WSPD 

It takes only one to reo 
ALL Toledo. First by fa 

• 

MIAMI 
WCBS 

50,000 Watts— CBS 
ALL South Florida 

• 

LOS ANGELES 
KPOP 

Covers the 
2nd largest market 



1 • National Sales Offices: 625 Madison Ave., N.Y. 22, PLaza 1-3940 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, FRanklin 2-6498 



COMPETITORS, YES 




p. N. PI.YI.AB, JH. 

Vice-President 

Utopia Cleaners and Dyers 





MAURICE BEBTHON 

O-eneral Manag'er 

Bertlion Cleaners and Dyers 



BUT THEY'RE BOTH SOLD 
ON WAPI RADIO 



"WAPI programs are 
thoughtfully produced 
and professionally pre- 
sented. This attracts the 
adult radio listeners who 
are our c usto mers . 
Utopia Cleaners and 
Dyers are sold on 
WAPI." 



"We feel that quality dry 
cleaning and quality ra- 
dio go hand in hand. 
That's why we use 
WAPI radio exclusively 
todeliveroursales story. 
This is the station with 
the adult audience." 



WAPI 

50,000 Watts* 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO., INC. 

•5,000 Nights 



1 



SPONSOR 

THC VVCCHLV MAGAZINE TV/RAOIO AOVCRTISCRS USC 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

Newrs Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 

Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Charles Eckert; 
Gilda Gomez 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 i 




THE 

DIFFERENCE 

BETWEEN 



• Every Nielsen report ever issued for the 

Minneapolis-St. Paul Television Area credits 

WCCO Television with the majority of sets 

in use, sign on to sign off, every day 

It I J I J I J lSTj vT 111 r^J /^. I of every week. In an area served by four 

^^^^^^^m §ood aggressive TV stations, the 

X ±\ Jl. V V ^ Xn \^ iXi ^ JL ^^^rfll difference between good and great 

___ _ _ ^ ^^^. ^ ^,-^ _. _ ^P^ I shows up plainly in Channel 

X. P^ I J Pj V -LI^iV-/J.N fV-yjB^'s continuous control of the great 

^ ^.-^ ^P^T^^B ^"^^ ''^ ^^^ tv'eu-'/ng audience. 

lo . . •■^^1 



(III.I 



hiJI 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



to the 




Q 




JV^ witli WPTA 
^S^ FORT WAYNE 

the 

liveliest" station 

in town 

with over 

20 hours of 

TOP rated 

local live 

programming 



Romper Room 

Get Happy-Daytime 
variety 

Little Rascals Club 

Fun n Stuff with Popeye 

Evening and Morning 
News 

Promenade 21 
Club 21 Dance Show 
Sports Desk 
Midget Racing 

e Shock with Ainsworth 
Chumberly 

WITH THE TOP 
ABC NETWORK 




_Jsk tL 



A- 



I I I _yVjfc the man from 

YOUNG TV CORP. 
I I I . 



WPTA ^a.../ 21 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



In the wake of his return from a five-iveek tv inspection tour 
of the Far East, AB-PT President Leonard Goldenson has 
established an international division and appointed Donald 
W . Coyle as its vice president. The move portends increasing 
interest in and competition for station and program domi- 
nance outside the U.S. All tv nets have foreign properties. 

The newsmaker: Donald W. Coyle, 37-year-old ABC vice 
president, who has been general sales manager of the growing tele- 
vision network since September of last year, has been out of the 
country on two missions in the two weeks since he took over his new 
management responsibility for what may well be the network's great- 
est area of potential expansion. 

His plans are top secret, and are expected to remain so for about 
six months because of competitive bids for foreign franchises. He's 
headquartering in New York, thus far without any formalized staff 
assisting him, and duties at this 
juncture are being handled by him 
and Mr. Goldenson (to whom he 
reports directly). Their mission 
last week : cementing relations with 
foreign governmental representa- 
tives in Washington. 

Don Coyle expects to be out of 
the country approximately one 
half of his working time, with his 
division concentrating on the ac- 
quisition of tv stations and the 
sale of tv program properties in 
five areas of the world: Canada, 
Latin America, Europe, the Near East and the Far East. ABC cur- 
rently has tv station interests in Costa Rica and Australia, and plans 
heavy expansion into station operations. With facilities comes cir- 
culation which, in turn, builds an audience and a demand for pro- 
gram product. The programing, initially, will be filmed and taped. 

Coyle's forays into foreign tv — and they have just begun — indicate 
"Tv is starting to bubble, just about to boil. Everyone is interested 
in developing tv, and I can already sense these countries coming 
alive in their awareness of possibilities in a free flow of tv ideas. 

One of the first tasks he has assigned himself is a fast course at 
Berlitz because he acquired "only a smattering" of language at Am- 
herst College (from which he was graduated with a B.A. degree). 
He's been with the network nine years, starting as a research writer 
and going to director of research for the tv network, later for both 
radio and tv. Named director of sales development and research for 
ABC TV in February, 1956, he became a v.p. the following March. 
Last fall he became v.p., general sales manager of the tv network. ^ 




Donald W. Coyle 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




'S 141 MILLION MILES 

^J W^^rViV #ml^^^ I^#m^^i\ in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Drivers 
this daily distance by spending an average of 1 hour and 36 minutes behind their auto radios. KMPC serves this 
St of all automobile audiences mth 2 Airwatch helicopters. 3 mobile ground units . . . each able to shortwave instan- 
)us bulletins to listeners. Result: KMPC's frequency is pre-set on more auto radios than that of any other station. 
2 reaches the greatest number of automobiles and homes in a day— in a week, 
ove your product in Los Angeles, go with the station that's on the move . . . 



50.000 watts / Los Angeles 



KMPC 



LOS ANCCCES CITY TRAFFIC BUREAU. PAIR, INC. 
A RADIO RATINGS. JUtY 1959 



A Golden West Broadcasters station CI^A/S / Represented by AM Radio Sales Company 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



For the Picture of Pictures . . . 
lAPE IT RCA! 




PICTURE TH 



PRODUCT 



WITH 



SPARKLII 




RCA TV TAPE ! 



1 



One glass of cool, frosty refreshment A enticing your viewers with its sparkling real- 
ism — can make more people go out and 'buy thanVO,000 words! Your local live com- 
mercials can attain the highest standarck of picture quality. Whether it's beer, or 
pop, or pies, or cars, you see the productVeatures Vn sharpest detail on RCA TV 
Tape. Designed for color picture perfectionXthe HCA TV Tape Recorder adds an 
extra bonus to black and white, producing pictures which are exceptionally clear 
and crisp. Tapes made or played on RCA equipment give best possible results. 
Among its advanced features your engineer will cWirr end are electronic quadrature 
adjustment, sync regeneration, four-channel playback equalization and built-in test 
equipment. See your RCA Representative or write to RCA, Dept. TR-4, Building 
15-1, Camden, N. J. In Canada: RCA VICTOR Cbmpany Limited, Montreal. 



ANOTHER WAY RCA SERVES INDUSTRY THROUGH ELEC 




RONICS 



RADiO CORPORATtCM of AMERICA 



Tmk($) ® 



broadcast and/television equipment 
c/mden, n./j. 




Pholo by CHET KRAN2 



All television advertising* is inevitably affected by 
the personality of the station carrying it. And — 
all such advertising is most effective when it can 
acquire immediacy and excitement and interest 
from a station which means these things to its 
audience. 

For more than a decade, WSM-TV has used every 
legitimate promotional device (even girls in eye 
patches) for the creation of a dynamic station 
image, or personality. To the people in the WSM- 
TV listening area, Channel 4 has thus become more 
than a number on a dial. It is their favorite 
companion to a world of excitement, entertainment 
and information. Thus WSM-TV becomes a Power- 
ful accompanist for your sales song. 



Nashville, Tennessee 



Represented by 



Edward PetryA Co., Inc. 



The Original Station Representative 




OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
12 SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



17 OCTOBER 1959 National spot radio buying perked up somewhat the past week in both New 

Copyright 1959 York and Chicago. 

SPONSOR The calls for availabilities in New York included such brands as Pall Mall (SSCB), 

PUBLICATIONS iNO. Brillo (JWT) and Nucoa (DFS), while the major activity in Chicago came from Swift's 

Allsweet Margarine (Burnett) and Red Heart Dog Food (Shaw). 

Pall Mall is buying in four-week flights in about 50 markets, Red Heart is also 
spreading over 50 markets and Allsweet will schedule in 60 markets. 



The 1959-60 season could be on the way to carving out new records for view- 
ing at night : Trendex reports that the sets in use during its checking week this month was 
6% better than for October 1958. 

In fact, viewing was up every night in the week compared to the year before. 

The average nighttime use this October week was 55.4%, as compared to 52.3% for 
October 1958. 

Another significant finding that week by Trendex: the average rating points for the 
three networks added up to 52.3, which was 7% over the joint tally of 48.9, which 
prevailed for the 1958 October week. 



Lucky Strike (BBDO) may be setting out to build a franchise for itself in the 
nighttime tv ID: it's buying that item in choice station breaks. 

The move could have the effect of not only activating a renewed interest in ID but 
in filling the vacuum left in that area by the exits of Maxwell House Coffee and Brown & 
Williamson. 

Lucky Strike's ID campaign is being placed for a start in about 40 markets. The 
initial orders are, at the least, for 10 weeks. What happens thereafter depends on the 
dent those IDs make on the viewers' fancy. 



The tv networks recognize the obligation to the egghead set and they're ap- 
parently willing to pay for it. 

Take as the latest case in point CBS TV's absorption of the cost of producing the 
six information programs that Bell & Howell and Goodrich will sponsor this season. 

The network estimates it'll take at least $90,000 to turn out one of these programs 
but the charge will be but $50,000 net between the two advertisers. 

The motive is twofold : (1) CBS figures the corporate image created by this type of 
programing at night is worth so much; (2) the price to the two sponsors offers a competi- 
tive cost-per-thousand ($3.85, as projected by the network) for this series as compared to 
the CPM which prevails for general run of regularly scheduled nighttime programing. 



Imagine an advertiser who finds that tv carries such a wallop that he has to be 
careful how much of it he uses! That's the plight of Chun King (BBDO, Minneapolis). 

The victualer has just renewed spot for all its markets, but this time on a one-week- 
in and two-weeks-out basis. 

The reason: Tv's been so successful that it takes Chun King two weeks to resupply 
the dealers on a sell-out situation. 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



13 



mi 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



An agency other than Esty — a periodic stickler on the subject — ^has got tough 
with radio stations about scheduling announcements in spots not stipulated on con- 
firmation orders. 

The other agency, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, last week put stations carrying Tetley 
Tea business on notice to this effect: Payment of bills would be held up where discrep- 
ancies appeared on affidavits. 

Warned OBM: It won't accept any substitute unless previously notified. 

As a sort of counterbalance to the foregoing plaints, note the fact that buyers 
have found radio stations quite scrupulous in following through on rotation plans 
where spots are bought within a time block and the scheduling left to the station. 

Under this type of buying an agency designates what span of hours (say, 7 to 9 a.m.) 
it wants to be in and depends on the station to "float" the spot into a different half-hour 
within this span on successive days. 

Bekins Van & Storage (LaRoche), a 52-week user of spot tv from the Pacific 
Coast to the midwest, is expanding its budget and markets for next year. 
It may also tie in some radio schedules. 

Before you dash off that chestnut about radio ofifering nothing new in pro 
granting, pause and take note of a format that's catching on fast with local stations 

It comes in one-minute units, mostly, and is given the umbrella label of Feature Radio 
The individual segments are all preceded by the word, Feature. Like Feature Anee 
dote, Feature Community, Feature Fahrenheit, Feature Job, Feature Personality, 
Feature Health, Feature Housewife, Feature Romance, etc. 

There'll be a NCS :^4 for tv and probably a new coverage study for radio. 

The tv study, discloses Nielsen, will coincide in terms of measurement period 
with the taking of the 1960 U.S. Census. 

Nielsen's last tv coverage opus came out in the spring of 1958. 

Competitive note: ARB is also working on a coverage service for 1960. (For 
details see 19 September sponsor, page 42.) 

To give you an idea of the growing marketing opportunities in the lowest age group: 
more money was spent last year on baby needs than on cosmetics. 

The baby figure was $484 million as against $445 million for cosmetics. 
These two sales figures for 1958 may also surprise you: 

1) Much more money was spent on hair products than on cosmetics, the tally 
for the former being $633 million. 

2) Whereas all types of cereals did $1.6 billion, candy sales amounted to $2.3 
billion. 

Many sellers of the medium would take strong exception to the line of think- 
ing about spot radio that a well-known New York media director has been propounding to 
his agency's clients. 

Radio, he's been telling them, is still a highly merchandisable medium to retailers, 
but to get the right impact in that quarter, advertisers have to: 

1) Buy in terms of tonnage, starting with 60-75 announcements over a five-day week. 

2) Use two or three stations in the market so that an ample quotient of the radio 
audience is reached that week. 

3) Compress the buying into six hours of the day — 7 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. 

14 SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Come 1 January and you'll likely witness the last big turn of the wheel away 
from network radio's historical status as a full-time advertising medium. 

From evidence at hand this week NBC Radio seems bent on (1) adjusting the network's 
programing structure to the kind of medium network radio has become; (2) eliminating 
elements that are not producing network sales and (3) putting its operation on a basis 
of what it deems maximum service and potential profitability. 

With these intents in mind NBC Radio will present a new programing and general rela- 
tions plan to affiliates at a three-day meeting starting 11 November. 

One speculation in the trade is that under the revised system NBC will wind up retaining 
for national sale only the various news sequences plus Monitor and making available other 
programing for sustaining use or local sales by its aflSliates on a fee basis. 

The network, say NBC spokesmen, will go on compensating its stations — some- 
thing that CBS Radio shelved when it inaugurated its Consolidated Program Plan 
last year. 



This has been a banner year for tv in the number of trade associations that have 
aligned themselves with the medium. 

All but three of these 10 trade associations are or have been associated during the year 
with regular network schedules: 

TRADE GROUP PROGRAMING USED 

American Dairy Association Perry Corao Show, Today 

American Gas Association Playhouse 90 

American Petroleum Institute Today 

California Prune Board Today 

Edison Electric Institute Various daytime shows 

Florida Citrus Various programing 

Florists Telegraph Tournament of Roses 

Savings & Loan Foundation Various programing 

Swiss Watchmakers Specials 

U.S. Brewers Institute Specials 



Again as last year, ABC TV was the first in the early-fall sprint among the net- 
works to reveal how each is doing against the competitors nighttime-wise. 

Key point in the revelation, based on the Nielsen 24-niarket report for the Week ending 
4i October: A year ago ABC was third; now it's second. Averages, 7:30-10:30 p.m.: 

NETWORK 1959 1958 

ABC TV 18.8 rating; 32.4 share 17.0 rating; 28.2 share 

CBS TV 19.7 rating; 34.1 share 22.4 rating; 37.8 share 

NBC TV 16.7 rating; 28.8 share 18.5 rating; 30.7 share 



NBC TV doesn't plan to put out a revised discount structure, in response to CBS 
TV's recent action, until the first of the year. 

Indications are that the new NBC TV allowances won't be anything as drastic, either 
for summer customers or early evening hour users, as announced by CBS TV. 

NBC feels that since the CBS changes don't take effect until next April, there's no reason 
to rush. It can afford to wait and see how clients react to the competitor's new 
formula. 

(For analysis of the implications of the CBS newest discount plan and what the trade 
has to say about it see article starting page 33.) 

• 17 OCTOBER 1959 15 



16 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



SPONSOR-SCOPE'S Chicago correspondent, bent on giving Detroit an inkling of 
what it has to contend with, last week conducted a survey among local Chevrolet dealers 
on how they're doing with the Corvair, GM's big bid for the compact market. 

The highlights of these findings — which should intrigue both admen and media sellers: 

1) Taking to the small model are the sophisticated, and by that they mean (a) the 
younger married groups; (b) the young unmarried; (2) the non-status-seekers. 

2) Other segments of the population still seek status and still want the big 
models, fancy bodies, chrome and all. 

3) Chief complaint about the Corvair: Not enough luggage space and the optional 
feature — convertible backseat — is too expensive to make the difference worthwhile. 
Also, by the time all the extras are added, such as power-glide, etc., the price is up in the 
Impala class. 

Agencies may not know it, but there's a trend among radio stations to adopt technical 
devices for preserving, and improving, the quality of transcribed commercials. 

Also that such stations are going to no little expense to make sure that an advertiser's 
announcements are run in the right sequence and at maximum audio efficiency. 

Basically all the devices involve transferring the commercials from transcriptions to 
tape, but the various systems for automatically integrating the announcements into the sched- 
ule would make an interesting study for commercial writers especially. 

International's Buster Brown Shoes (Burnett) is going after the Christmas trade 

with a spot tv schedule in 61 markets. It's looking for kid show adjacencies mostly. 

Other new spot tv activity out of Chicago: Quaker Corn Meal (John W. Shaw, minutes 
and 20's for 37 weeks; Rather Packing (Earle Ludgin), western and southern markets. 

Are the dynamic creative personalities like the Burnetts and the Ogilvys the 
last survivors of a breed that is doomed to vanish from the heights of the agency 
business? 

Judging from how some of the keener minds in the field view it, the answer is emphat- 
ically in the aflSrmative. 

If, argue these observers, the commentators on the business were to rid themselves of 
their stereotyped image of the business they'd discover it wasn't the sensitive creative 
type that was making the big pot boil. Rather it's the master administrator who's adept 
at picking the right skills, welding them into a strong team and managing their joint 
efforts as a modern communications service. 

The picture, they add, may strike some of the oldtimers as stark and impersonal, but 
in the long run the agency field will find that to survive on a grand scale the 
quality of administration must take precedence over any other. 



Tending to confirm this portent is the increasing tendency among the larger agen- 
cies to veil their people in corporate anonymity. 

The reigning philosophy seems to be: Keep the executives out of the personality 
limelight and put the build-up stress at all times on the organization itself. Color 
is alright if it's part of the agency's image, but it isn't safe to let it collect around an 
individual. 

There are some in the business who hold that such a policy is bound to have a decisive 
impact on tv department heads. More and more of them will, it is predicted, gravitate 
toward the extra mural precincts of program production. 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 8; 
Spot Buys, page 52; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 54; Washington Week, page 77; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 80; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 84; and Film-Scope, page 78. 

SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 




PRC 



III -'■=;,•;" ® 



EDWARD PETBt & CO., Nol.onol Rep(»i«nloli< 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



17 




I 



VITTORIO DESICA DAN DAILEY 

RICHARD CONTE JACK HAWKINS 

THE 
FOUR 
JUST 

MEN 

now 
setting 
sales 
records 
all over 
the world 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



488 MADISON AVE. 'N-Y. 22 'PL 5-2100 



18 




I 




by Joe Csida I 



Sponsor 




Baseball and brickbats 

By purest coincidence I have had occasion to 
watch the audience interest in, and reaction to. 
the World Series in three diflferent towns this 
year: New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas. I 
do not, of course, mean to palm off a day here 
and a day there, even moving around very fast, 
as an authentic survey of any kind, but m) 
guess is that just as this Series is setting all kinds 
of new dollar records at the gate, just so will it also set new viewing 
highs. (This piece is being written Tuesday, 6 October, right after 
the fifth game.) 

New York, without a team contending, may actually be down a 
little from some of the series of the last several years when the 
Yankees were participants, but I'm sure viewing, even in Gotham, 
will not be down too much. After all, the final National League 
playoff game in which the Dodgers took it all from the Milwaukee 
Braves in a real extra inning spine-tingler made a great Series trailer, 
whether you were from New York or anywhere else. 

On-the-scene and tv reaction 

But in Los Angeles on Sunday and Monday, 4 and 5 October, I 
doubt whether anyone in the town who wasn't at the Coliseum was 
anywhere but in front of a television set, or tv being unavailable (as 
in taxicabs), sharp-eared at a radio receiver. Monday I was having 
lunch in the Record Room at the Brown Derby with an old friend, 
Walt Heebner, when naturally they turned on the tv. It was a color 
set, but the man in charge had made the mistake of running the 
black-and-white when the game started, and when he tried to turn to 
color the sophisticated Holly woodites wouldn't even give him time tOi 
sharpen the tuning. "Never mind fooling around," they yelled. 
"Turn back to black-and-white." 

The game, of course, ran long past the lunch hour but nobody left 
the Derby. I had to leave because I had a date out at MCA in 
Beverly Hills. There, too, however, secretaries squealed throughout 
the afternoon as the Dodgers took a four-nothing lead, wailed as the 
Sox tied it, and went into ecstasies as Gil Hodges finally won it in 
the eighth with a home run. With one or two notable exceptions, the 
secretaries' bosses were as preoccupied with the baseball doings, too. 
All of which, of course, is only to be expected in a town where they 
have won their first pennant, and that after they've only had a big 
league ball club for just a few seasons. 

In Vegas today, Tuesday, tv sets were going all around the Sands. 
In the gaming room, croupiers paid scant attention to the one or two 
incurable dice throwers, who chased the fickle Lady even during the 
ball game. At the bar adjoining the gaming room, the contest was 
being shown on a three by four foot projection model tv, and virtu- 
ally everyone watched the doings. The feeling for the Dodgers here 



SPON.SOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



\bu have to have it 

to win it 



'Tie good advertisement, inevitably, 
ings with confidence. Bored, bland 
/ords and timid half-truths are as 
lid as man, but they have never 
noved man to action, nor won his 
onfidence. 

This rule is not suspended for the 
v^ords in an advertisement, no 
natter how many committees re- 
vrrite or approve them. 

To win a customer's confidence 
in advertisement has to have con- 
idence — not the false kind of confi- 
ience that a cynic described as 
'being wrong at the top of your 
'oice," but the kind of confidence 
hat comes from knowing what 
/ou're talking about, believing in 
-vhat you're talking about, and say- 
ng it so people know how you feel. 

This is the kind of confidence we 
try to put into advertising. 




We work for the following companies: Allstate Insurance Companies • American Mineral Spirits Co. 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co. • Brown Shoe Company • Campbell Soup Company • Chrysler Corpo- 
ration • Commonwealth Edison Company and Public Service Company • The Cracker Jack Co. • The Electric 
Association (Chicago) • Green Giant Company • Harris Trust and Savings Bank • The Hoover Company • Kellogg 
Company • The Kendall Company • The Maytag Company • Motorola Inc. • Philip Morris Inc. • Chas. Pfizer & Co., 
Inc. • The Pillsbury Company • The Procter & Gamble Company • The Pure Oil Company • The Pure Fuel Oil 
Company • Star-Kist Foods, Inc. • Sugar Information, Inc. • Swift & Company • Tea Council of the U. S. A., Inc. 



fl 



LEO BURNETT CO., INC 

CHICAGO, Prudential Plaza • NEW YORK • DETROIT • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO • MONTREAL 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 19.59 



19 



WHAT 
IS A 

PRE RATING 
SALE 



9 



WLUK-TV is out to prove it has THE au- 
dience in Wisconsin's wealthy Green Bay 
— Fox River Valley market. To do this, 
WLUK-TV is conducting a pre-rating sale* 
that earns advertisers discounts up to 53% 
above existing rate card prices and fre- 
quency discounts published in Standard 
Rate and Data. WLUK-TV guarantees rate 
protection at SPECIAL SALE PRICES 
until September 1, 1960 for all advertisers 
on the air prior to December 1, 1959. 

If you're an advertiser or time buyer 
who knows, you know WLUK-TV is the 
best buy in Green Bay and the Fox River 
Valley, Wisconsin's Big Second Market. 

LOOK AT THE FACTS: 

On the Nielsen published for March • April, 
1959, Channel 11, WLUK-TV showed a 
strong second position in the Green Bay 
Metro-Area. Since then, we've added the 
following: 

NEW TALLER TOWER 



Sponsor backstage continued 






NEW TOWER SITE OVERLOOKING GREEN BAY 

NEW POWER -316 KW ERP — GREEN BAY'S 
MOST POWERFUL TV STATION 

NEW CALL LETTERS 
(w/lth $40,000 in regional promotion) 

NEW EXPANDED STUDIOS IN 
DOWNTOWN GREEN BAY 

NEW ABC PROGRAMMING, 
the BIG netw/ork in 1959-60 



Time Buyers who want to keep their rat- 
ings up will see their Hollingberry man. 
He's ready to talk about the WLUK-TV 
Pre-Rating sale. 



W^LUK TV 



€1 



CHANNEL 11 

Joe Mackin, General Manaser 



Represented Nationally by Geo. P. Hollingberry Co. 
In Minneapolis see Bill Hurley 



*Nietsen and ARB ratings will be 

taken in November, 1959, and 

will be published early in December. 



is practically as rabid as it is in L.A., and I'm sure the rating figures 
for the games here will set new highs too. 

Sports a headache to some sponsors 

As much of a joy as the Series is to the viewers and to the Gillette 
brass and their agency, just so much of a headache is it turning out 
to be to NBC and some of that web's other sponsors. The Sunday 
game, for example, ran into more than half the River Boat episode. 
NBC ran what was left of the new Darren McGavin filmed series any- 
way, and I guess the sponsor was hojDing that most of the vast audi- 
ence he was inheriting from the ball game would stay tuned. I doubt 
they did, but the rating figures on this should prove interesting. 

And baseball isn't the only sport that's knocking some of the major 
regular shows in the head. The Texas-California football game on 
Saturday, 3, ran into most of another major new NBC stanza, Bo- 
nanza. I don't know what, if any, solution there may be to this situ- 
ation, but it is one with which sponsors must learn to contend. 

On the pops side 

It seems to me that on more and more frequent occasions, though 
certainly not to any major degree, sponsors pick up vast additional 
chunks of audience through sheerest good luck. The Hennessy epi- 
sode on CBS TV, Monday, 6, was a good example. This new series 
starring Jackie Cooper is on film, of course, and the half hour shown 
on Monday, 6, was filmed 27 and 28 July. The script featured as 
special guest star, around whom the whole plot was built, a young 
singer I've mentioned previously, Bobby Darin. 

In the episode Bobby, playing the role of a singer named Honey- 
boy Jones sings a song called "Mack, the Knife" twice. In July no- 
body involved with the show nor with young Darin had any idea 
that "Mack, the Knife" would ever be released as a single record. It 
was then, and is now, part of an LP called "Bobby Darin, That's 
All." But it also just happens, that the very week this Hennessy epi- 
sode hit the air, Bobby Darin's "Mack, the Knife" is also the No. 1 
single record in the nation, by all charts. 

Talking about Darin reminds me of another tv personality, who 
has developed in the past several years into one of the medium's ma- 
jor salesmen. I'm talking about Dick Clark, on whom the Saturday 
Evening Post in the current issue carries one of the most prejudiced, 
biased, inept articles I have ever read. Strangely enough, or maybe 
not so strangely the piece is written by one of the Post's own editors, 
Pete Martin. Martin has of course, written scores of features on all 
kinds of show business personalities, but in this one his lazy ap- 
proach, his failure, indeed his total disinterest in doing any kind of 
research on his subject at all is shameful. The tip-off on the mood in 
which he went to visit Clark and prepare his piece, to me, is clearly 
revealed in this paragraph from his article (Martin talking to Clark): 

"It's obvious that we're not going to agree about rock 'n' roll," 
I said, "and I guess we're not going to agree about Elvis Presley. 
Something tells me that you're going to say he's an enormously tal- 
ented singer and a great influence for good with boys and girls. I've 
never seen Elvis toss his torso around, but I've read some repulsive 
word pictures about it, and I've seen photographs of his long, greasy, 
ducktail hairdo. All I can say is, he's not my type." 

Good, clean, objective, unprejudiced reporting, no? ^ 



20 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




ii 



responsMty 



Responsibility to the community we serve and to our adver- 
tisers is always first and foremost in our minds. Here, in 
Chicago, at WGN- Radio and WGN -Television, quality 
and integrity are manifest in every phase of our operations. 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



21 




has Greater 

Food SALES 

than the 12th 

Metropolitan 

Market 

28th Radio Market - WPTF 
$541,043,000 

28th Metropolitan Market 
$193,673,000 

12th Metropolitan Market 
$479,519,000 



NATION'S 
28th RADIO 
MARKET *^ 








rs 




Chiz Craster, Compton Advertising, Inc., New York, buyer for 
P & G, feels that the timebuyer has to be familiar with the contents 
of the commercials for which he buys time. "You can do your 
client more harm than good if you don't know the slant of the com- 
mercial and place it in a time slot that's out of key with the 
commercial's intended audience. 
Things run smoothly here at 
Compton and I've always been 
able to view the commercial or 
get hold of the copy beforehand, 
but I've heard of instances else- 
where where this wasn't the prac- 
tice. In one case, a buyer bought 
time for his client on a children's 
show. Ostensibly, this was the log- 
ical move, since the client was 
selling items for youngsters. As it 
turned out, however, the commer- 
cial was slanted toward an adult audience and pitched product fea- 
tures that wouldn't ordinarily impress the younger set. Net result: 
a few baffled children, and a waste of time, effort and money. Again, 
when the client buys in for a short flight of spots, most of the com- 
mercials should be slanted toward a specific audience. Any miscalcu- 
lation here could easily nullify the intended values of the campaign." 

Dorothy Gill, Clifford Gill Advertising Agency, Beverly Hills, finds 
that radio's most distinct and winning advantage for her is the 
medium's ability to pinpoint a particular audience. "Designations 
such as 'Farm' radio, 'Negro' radio, or 'Teen-age' radio are common 
to radio, and really to no other medium. Because of its ability to 

specialize, radio invites these kinds 
of designations. There is probably 
no important section of the buying 
public that radio can't reach with 
economy and impact. For ex- 
ample, a movie that is designed for 
teen-age viewing can be plugged 
most effectively on the station 
that has a format calculated to at- 
tract a large teen-age listenership." 
Dorothy notes that in large cities, 
radio's ability to appeal to speci- 
fied groups of people is of the 
highest significance. "The large metropolitan areas throughout the 
United States are comprised of many ethnic groups with varying 
cultures, backgrounds, tastes and habits. While one large medium 
may reach them all, it takes radio to reach each group individually, 
enabling the advertiser to make direct contact with the listener." 




22 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 





WONDERFUL 
SATURATION 



plus 

beautifuli^ 
andisirt 




A POWERFUL COMBINATION TO SELL MORE GOODS! 

W'I'T'H sells on the air and in the stores . . . gives you Baltimore's best 
radio buy! W*I*T*H saturates the Baltimore Metropolitan Market area with 
80% coverage . . . with merchandising plans in all major food chains . . . 
independents . . . and 450 drug stores! Phone, write or wire for details 
on these sales-proven plans: 

• BARGAIN BAR • SPOTLIGHT DRUGS 
• COMMUNITY CLUB AWARDS • CHAIN STORE PLANS 

THE COMPLETE SELL . . . ONLY ON 




Tom Tinsley, President 



Radio Baltimore 



R. C. Embry, Vice President 

National Representatives: Select Station Representatives /;/ New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington; Clarke Brown Co. 
/« Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, New Orleans; Daren F. McGavren Co. in Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit and on West Coast; Ohio Sta- 
tions Representatives in Cleveland. 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



23 



Here is tlii 




Metro Area 


People/sq. 
mi. 


Population 


Square Miles 


Tidewtar 

Birmingham 

Jacksonville 

Atlanta 

Tampa-St. Pete 

Charlotte-Gastonia 

Miami 


967 
569 
568 
538 
504 
451 
425 


772,700 
635,600 
441,200 
926,800 
657,800 
405,900 
873,300 


799 
1,118 

777 
1,724 
1,304 

900 
2,054 



Note: Ail figures above are from Sales Management. 



GREATEST POPULATION CONCENTRATION 
IN THE ENTIRE SOUTHEAST 



3/4 Million People in Less Than Half 
rea of Metropolitan Atlanta or Miami! 



^^ TIDEWATER, VA. 




^^^^ 





Here is a metropolitan area richer 
in retail sales than metro Richmond, 
Roanoke, and Lynchburg combined . . . 
yet so compact that you can sell more 
through fewer outlets, get better distri- 
bution of advertised merchandise, better 
coordinated wholesale and retail promo- 
tion . . . more positive sales results per 
man-hour of your merchandising effort, 
and per advertising dollar! 

TIDEWTAR is a better way to spell 
it— and sell it. For WTAR-TV has led in 
every audience survey ever made here, 
has no duplication within the metro area, 
and virtually no competition from any 
station outside the market! 

Call or wire WTAR-TV, Norfolk, Va., 
or your Petry man. 



Surprised? No wonder. Since 1950 Tidewtar has been 
growing at 2li times the national rate! Also, its true 
size is obscured by the fact that the U. S. Govern- 
ment unrealistically lists Norfolk and Newport News 
as separate metro areas. 

Sales Management and other statistical references 
follow suit, which gives rise to a lot of mistaken ideas 
about the "Norfolk market". Always add Norfolk & 
Newport News, all ways. They are much closer to- 
gether than Tampa-St. Pete, for example, with more 
people, and nearly twice the population density! 




Norfolk, Va. • Channel 3 

Represented by Edward Petry & Co. 



WSBT-TV 



ND.INDIANA'S 

IT STATION 




JOE BOLAND . . . America's Voice of Sports 

Every true sports fan in America knows WSBT-TV's Sports Direc- 
tor, Joe Bolond. A top sportscaster, he is currently covering pro foot- 
ball on CBS-TV, and the Notre Dame games on ABC radio. 

Joe's popular v/eekdoy show on WSBT-TV, "Boland With Sports," 
(5:45-6:00 P.M.) is one of the highest rated sport shows in television. 
It is typical of the many popular programs on WSBT-TV, that feature 
local personalities. 

Local programming combined with the top national shows give 
WSBT-TV a complete dominance of the South Bend market. The latest 
ARB shows WSBT-TV with 47.8% share of the sets in use, sign-on to 
sign-off! Of the 30 leading national programs, 27 are carried by this 
station! 

There's only one economical way to cover the South Bend tele- 
vision market, and that's with WSBT-TV. Get complete details about 
this $1,613,896,000 market from your Roymer man or write this sta- 
tion. Also ask about availabilities on "Boland With Sports", and other 
popular WSBT-TV shows that feature local personalities. 







SOUTH BEND, INDIANA • CHANNEL 22 

ASK PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



26 



49th an 
Madisor 



One olone 

"Television Basics," Section 3, is 
mislabeled! 

It is a television basic that the 
Charleston-Huntington market is one 
market. Page 19 of your "Television 
Basics," Section 3, for color tv sta- 
tions' listings shows them as separate 
markets. 

C. Thomas Garten 
WSAZ, Inc., v.p. 
Huntington, W . Va. 



Scrap book 

I thought you might be interested 
in the attached copy of SPONSOR. 
You'll see that it's about half its orig- 
inal size because of the number of 
articles I tore out. It makes a pretty 
good exhibit of how useful a trade 
paper should be. 

I wish you would change your way 
of binding the magazine so it would 
be easier to tear pages out. Then my 
joy with you would be complete. 

John H. Leonard 
Batten, Barton, 
Durstine & Oshorn, Inc. 
N.Y.C. 

A feather in our cap 

We were very pleased with the fine 
article, "Why Lite Diet Pre-Sells Its 
Tv On the Road" (19 September is- 
sue) . 

Frankly, I was a bit reluctant to 
delve into the background of this 
story. On too many occasions, I've 
seen the damage that can be caused 
when a careless reporter works on an 
article without a shred of pre-digested 
information or background on the 
product concerned to guide him in 
his approach to the material at hand. 
However, your man seemed to know 

{Please turn to page 28) 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




wmmi M ENcHKtD M 5aN %m%o 



which didn't surprise any of us in the ieast! 

NOR WERE WE SURPRISED TO FIND THAT MORE THAN 
TWICE AS MANY VIEWERS WATCHED KHRUSHCHEV 
MAKE HIS KEY BAY AREA ADDRESS VIA 
KRON/TV THAN ON ALL OTHER 
SAN FRANCISCO TV STATIONS 

COMBINED. ^ 




STATION 


ARB RATING 


KRON/TV 


31.5 


(b) 


3.4 


(C) 1 


14.8 


(d) 1 


7.7 


others 


4.4 



^ 



Monday night, September 21, all San 
Francisco-Oakland Area TV stations car- 
ried a pooled telecast of Khrushchev's 
address. 

This ARB survey taken during the tele- 
cast once again demonstrates KRON/TV's 
superior viewer-acceptance. 



just one more 

example of how 

complete viewer acceptance 
proves 



KCTisTinSF! 



m 



/T"\7" san francisco 

San Francisco Chronicle • NBC Affiliate • Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



27 



Frank Buetel 



Roy Carr 




These capable radio personalities can make 
your wish come true. They're in the air all over 
the Twin Cities market, riding around on 
1280 kilocycles. They talk to everyone . . . everyone 
likes them. They're an "open sesame" to the 
riches of Minnesota. 

You don't even need a magic lamp. These WTCN 
genii come when you call. The moment you 
pick up your phone and call your Katz man, our 
modern day genii stand ready and able to do your 
bidding . . . your selling . . . your promoting. Give it 
a try, today. Make a wish on the Twin Cities 
market. Then, call your Katz man for availabilities on 
Twin Cities WTCN Radio. The results will astound you 




WTCN 



IINNEAPOL.IS • ST. PAUL 



RADIO 

Affiliate American Broadcasting Network 
Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 



AND 

TV 



49TH & MADISON 

[Continued from page 26) 

exactly where he was heading in his 
interviews, and was quick to grasp 
the details of our particular opera- 
tion. 

Many thanks for a really excellent 
treatment. 

William Conover 

acct. superv. 

Mogul, Williams 

& Say lor 

N.Y.C. 



Valuable source 

Your Air Media Basics is great! 
As a student in radio and television 
here at the University of Alabama, 
I am currently engaged in a research 
project concerning present tv pro- 
graming trends in the U. S. Your 
wonderful magazine gave me a tre- 
mendous amount of valuable informa- 
tion and new ideas to expound on 
and project in my report. It will 
certainly find an honored spot on my 
desk from now on. 

Here's to your continued success. 

Frank Hollub 
University, Alabama 



We've lost no time in putting your 
13th annual edition of sponsor's Air 
Media Basics to good use. 

The up-to-date information on lis- 
tening and viewing habits, etc., is 
most helpful in planning our 1960 
campaign. 

Lester E. Johnson 
Applegate Adv. Agency 
Muncie, Ind. 



Reprint request 

In your 5 September 1959 issue, 
on page 34, there appears an article 
titled: "When to Use Humor in Tv 
Commercials." We would appreciate 
your giving us permission to offset 
this article. 

John C. Ryder 

Local Trademarks, Inc. 

N.Y.C. 



• Note: SPONSOR is usually happy to granl 
such requests for reprinting privileges. Two 
provisions accompany this permission : 

1. Requests must be in -writing. 

2. Credit must be given to SPONSOR. 

SPONSOR reprints many of its articles and 
has back files on a large number of them. 



28 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



^ 






^" 






"*"* 




































































- - 














^ 


r 
















^^^^' 
















^^^ 


^^' "^fc. 














/V" f "■ 


\J 










i 










M ^^^^ 








^^^M ^^ ~^ 


^ 






■k. •S^-. 4 




i'! 



bigger 

with% BIG MOVIES! 

WUW-TV 



■HI 



You'll be sitting pretty and your sales will, too, in America's 6th market. 
Most of the best movies: PARAMOUNT, 20th CENTURY FOX, 
UNITED ARTISTS, WARNER BROS. Turn that sales chart up with 
big minutes in "Watch & Win," "Afternoon Movie," "Big Show," 
"Nite Movie." Call KATZ today for availabilities! 



SPONSOR 



You know where you're going wllh a 

National Sales Offices: 625 Madison Avenue, N.Y. 22 

17 OCTOBER 1959 



station 

230 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1 



29 



News takes no holidays. Neither does NEWSFILM. Seven days a week, twenty-four hours 
a day— whenever, wherever the big stories break— NEWSFILM is on the job to capture 
the news on film and speed the results to subscribing stations. 

NEWSFILM, a product of award -winning CBS News, is the only full-time, seven-day 
news service in all television. NEWSFILM's staff of camera correspondents, reporters, 
editors, laboratory technicians and couriers (the largest, most skilled news-gathering 
operation in the world) works around the globe, around the clock to bring to NEWSFILM 



\ 



SUNDAY 
DRIVER 




te>. ■'Vl.- 



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subscribers 12 minutes of news a day, every day . . . with no weel<end breaf< in delivery. 

Total -weei< coverage is just one of many NEWSFILM exclusives. And one of many 
reasons why NEWSFILM (available to ajl stations) is now serving broadcasters in more 
than 80 United States markets, as well as in 21 foreign countries throughout the world. 

For a rundown of what NEWSFILl\/l can do for your station's news coverage, call us. 



". . . the best film programs for all stations." Offices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, 
Detroit. Boston, San Francisco. St. Louis, Dallas, Atlanta. Canada: S. W. Caldwell, Ltd. 



CBS FILMS'^ 





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your 
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TO TELEVimONrCOVERAGE 
IN THE ENTIRE SOUTHEAST 
IS CHARLOTTE'WBTV 

Make your own comparison ! ^f^J 

NCS #3 gives CHARLOTTE-WBTV 632,070 TV homes. 
Atlanta has 579,090. Louisville 509,480. Birmingham 
587,800. Memphis 453,240- CHARLOTTE STATION "B" 
442,690. Miami 434,800. New Orleans 380,020. Nashville 
366,560. Norfolk-Portsmouth 337,580. Richmond 3 11, 680. 

Take the biggest step first — enjoy Charlotte's invigorating 
sales climate. Contact WBTV or CBS Television 
Spot Sales for the complete market story. 





BOMBSHELL 

FOR 
TV RATES? 



SP O NSOR 

17 OCTOBER 1959 



::bs television network 



ith thli latter tbs CBS Taltrlslon Vstvoik umoimoaB two ohonges 
n dlsoount atruoturs. Tba obaagea vlll lirlng the network' a oliarg( 
or tlOM Into closer allgnnent vith established patterns of televi; 
Ion seta In use, as the/ Tar; tiy aaasons throngli the year and. aa ' 
;he7 vary by boora through the night. 

In our re-eraluatlon of network time ohargea we reeognlie that i 
the advertieer the existing annual dlsoount has not been ao ou^ 
, dleoount for year-round broadoastlng aa an Insentlve for confl 
Ing without lapse throughout the auamer. And we note too t' 
11 evening time parloda hwra proTldad aiual Talus. 

Lr these rsasona: 

1. Ws ahall grsatly sxpand continuity dlsoouats in 
a 13-wesk Bumsr Bsason, both to snoourags winter 
olisnts to stay on ths air and to create an inoen- 
tlTa for added sumssrtlns uss of our faoilltlea. 
At ths aaoa time we abal^aiiiBMiaoountain the 



PAGE ONE of the two-page letter from William H. Hylan, CBS TV 
v.p., announcing the new rate card structure, effective I April I960 



RECENT RATE CARD REVISIONS BY CBS TV MAY HAVE FAR- 
REACHING IMPLICATIONS FOR ALL SPOT AND NET PRICES 



/% little over two weeks ago, CBS TV, with a quiet 
two-page letter from v.p. William H. Hylan (see 
above), announced a series of rate card revisions, 
effective 1 April 1960, which may have an almost 
revolutionary effect on all future network and spot 
tv time prices. 

Like any other network rate card matter, the new 
CBS TV provisions are complex, knotty, difficult to 
understand. 

SPONSOR, checking reactions to the announcement 
among agencies, stations, and station representa- 



tives, found many who confided (off the record), 
"Frankly we don't know what it means." 

The media head of a giant Madison Avenue agen- 
cy said ruefully, "I've got to give the letter to a guy 
with an abacus who can tell me what it's all about." 

For its readers who may not have a special built- 
in abacus lying around, sponsor has made a special 
study of the CBS TV provisions with an eye to dis- 
covering what implications they may have for other 
net and spot tv rates, sponsor's conclusions: 

• CBS TV is pioneering a new concept of tv time 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



33 



pricing which may uhimatelv lead to 
a complete revision of all tv rate 
structures. 

• Such a revision would make tv 
wholly unique among all advertising 
media — with advertising costs based 
on delivered \alues, rather than on 
gross circulations. 

• The CBS TV move was made 
for sales and economic reasons, but 
its effect may be a whole new philoso- 
phy of tv rates for the industry. 

Despite the densitv of its rate card 



language, CBS TV is saying essen- 
tially two things: 1 ) tv rates should 
vary by seasons, and 2 1 tv rates 
should vary by time periods — accord- 
ing to audiences reached. 

• If this philosophy finds an en- 
thusiastic acceptance among agencies 
and advertisers, you can expect to see 
other networks and tv stations going 
even further in the direction of rate 
card revisions. 

• Details of these revisions will 
take a long time to work out, and it 






seems probable that the CBS TV plat' 
itself will be revised in some respects 

In a sense, the new CBS TV ratt 
card marks the first time that tv haj 
broken away from the rate structures *| 
and thinking it inherited from radio. •■' 
In another sense it represents the 
first time the tv medium has dared to, . 
call a spade a spade. 1 

The reason why these two points 
may not be immediately apparent to 
readers of the CBS TV announcement 
is their unfaniiliarity with complexi- 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy^ 



TV VIEWING AND CBS RATES 

By hours (nighttime) 

1. TV VIEWING HOMES (IN MILLIONS) 

6-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 8-9 p.m. 9-10 p.m. 



10-11 p.m. 




I I SUMMER 



WINTER 



2. NET COSTS AFTER MAXIMUM DISCOUNTS 

6-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 8-8:30 p.m. 8:30-9 p.m. 



9-10:30 p.m. 



10:30-11 p.m. 



66.25% 



66.25% 



73.75% 



75% 



80.75% 



76.25% 



= SOURCES: Viewing home figures from A. C. Nielsen, based on July- Aug. 1958 for summer and Jan. -Feb. 1959 for winter. ^ 

= Times are New York time. CBS discount figures show % of gross charges paid by o2-week advertisers with minimum $130,000 m 

S of gross weekly billing, under the new CBS rate structure for over-all discounts. = 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiil 



34 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



TV VIEWING AND CBS RATES 

By months 
1. % OF HOMES VIEWING OVER 12-MOINTH PERIOD 

MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. OEC. JAN. FEB. 



MARCH APRIL 



41.4 

I— I 1—1 36.6 




35.6 



42.2 



51.8 

47.4 r— , 



54.0 



55.0 



54.7 



52-6 51.4 



2. COSTS AFTER TIME-PERIOD DISCOUNTS (AVERAGED) 

MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN. 



FEB. 



MARCH 



APRIL 



Net 



60% 



60% 



60% 



Net 



Net 



Net 



Net 



Net 



Net 



Net 



Net 



SOURCES: Viewing home fisvires from A. C. Xielsen showing % of homes viewing per average minute (6 p.m. -mid.) for 
period May 1958-Apnl 1959. CBS bar shows an average of time-period discounts allowed to 13-week advertisers for a 
12-monlh period under the new rate card. Station hour discounts for 26-weeli advertisers are given in addition to time-period discounts. 



ties of modern network timebuying. 

In making its new rate card an- 
nouncement the network did not set 
up any new gross time rates. Instead 
it juggled its discount structure, add- 
ing some new discount provisions and 
I cutting back on others. 

At present, advertisers on tv net- 
works are allowed a variety of dis- 
counts, based on station hours and 
dollar volumes over 13-, 26- and 52- 
week periods. 

CBS TV has tinkered with its pre- 
vious discount structure to allow 
greater discounts for som.e prime time 
evening periods than for others, and 
for "summer season" discounts (13- 
week period beginning with the first 
Sunday in June) . 

The reason for and effect of these 
changes can be seen most clearly b) 
looking at the two charts shown here. 
Chart 1 plots tv viewing during eve- 
ning hours, according to Nielsen fig- 
ures. With this is shown the percent 
of net costs paid by advertisers earn- 



ing maximum discounts under the 
new CBS TV rate card. 

To earn maximum discounts an ad- 
vertiser must be on for 52 weeks with 
an average minimum of $130 thou- 
sand weekly gross billing for station 
time. Under the new CBS TV sys- 
tem, if he is on from 8 to 8:30 p.m. 
I NYT I the maximum discount he 
earns is 26.259f ; from 9 to 10:30, his 
maximum discount is only 19.25%. 

You will note that the discount pat- 
tern follows roughly (but not exactly) 
the pattern of tv viewing by evening 
hours. The greater the audience, the 
greater percentage of gross the adver- 
tiser has to pay. 

To understand the CBS TV philos- 
ophy on summer program time costs, 
take a look at chart No. 2. The top 
graph shows the pattern of tv view- 
ing bv months, according to Nielsen 
figures over a 12-month period. 

Below it, an average of the new 
"time-period" discounts which can be 
earned bv 13-week advertisers under 



the new CBS TV rate card. 

With the sole exception of the 6 to 
8 p.m. period for which there is a 
10*^ ( winter "time period" discount, 
net advertisers are not allowed such 
discounts from September to June. 

During the three sunmier months, 
however, when tv viewing dips. CBS 
TV grants time period discounts 
ranging from 35/V for 9 to 11 p.m. 
to 45% for 6 to 8:30 p.m. 

The result, of course, is to make 
the cost of network time, during June 
July and August, 55-65 "^r of what it 
is in winter. 

CBS TV in announcing these 
changes admits frankly that it hopes 
to induce more advertisers to stay on 
during the summer and to attract new 
advertisers to both sunnner and less 
desirable prime time periods. 

Individual tv stations have in the 
past however, used a variety of de- 
vices which, in effect, provide a flexi- 

{Please turn to page 681 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



35 



II 









«0 OF SVPBRif 



"SUPER ^00" 
GASOLINE 

BEST SPOT RADIO 
COMMERCIAL 

NATIONWIDE SURVEY 
AUGUST 1959 



PLAQUE was awarded to Clark Oil & Re 
fining Corporation in 5th John Blair 
survey of best spot radio commercials 



Clark Oil takes top radio award 



^ Midwest refiner's "Fizbee-Chief" spots beat out 
national brands in new poll of radio announcements 

^ Pulse survey of "best remembered" commercials in 
top cities gives first place to regional advertiser 



#%nnounced this week in New York, 
the fifth John Blair & Company study 
of top ranking spot radio commer- 
cials broke the usual pattern of na- 
tion-wide surveys by giving first 
place to a regional advertiser. 

For the first time since 1957, when 
Blair started its "best commercials" 
polling, a radio account with limited 
distribution showed its heels to the 
copy efforts of the Madison Avenue 



pros and the New York giants. 

Clark Oil & Refining Corp. of Mil- 
waukee (Nick Takton, director of 
advertising and Tatham-Laird, Chi- 
cago agency) proved a David among 
Goliaths with its "Fizbee-Chief" com- 
mercials, heard only in midwest mar- 
kets. 

The survey, conducted for Blair by 
Pulse, covered 1500 families in the 
five largest U.S. cities — New York, 



Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, 
and Detroit — with interviews in pro- 
portion to population. 

Families were asked simply "What 
radio commercials do you remember 
hearing in the past week?" No at- 
tempt was made to aid recall. 

Significant in the results is the fact 
that seven out of the top ten com- 
mercials were for beverages. Since 
the poll was conducted in August, 
this reflected the heavy beer and soft 
drink schedules on radio during sum- 
mer months. 

According to Art McCoy, Blair's 
exec, v.p., the 10 award-winning ra- 
dio campaigns in the survey stood 
out well ahead of competition, with 
the three leaders — Clarke, Coke, and 
Ford significantly above the others. 



36 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



I 

|| Clark Oil, which won the coveted 
Blair plaque, not only had to outpull 
;ome national giants but was unaided 
ti its fight by tv support or repetition 
p| its radio theme. 

Primarily a radio advertiser, Clark 
ilankets its marketing area with ra- 
iio saturation, and has built up 
strong acceptance for its Super 100 
Gasoline in the highly competitive 
midwest petroleum field. 

Its prize-winning commercials were, 
III some respects, the least elaborate 
of all in the top group. Though 
Clark uses a musical jingle sign-off, 
it depends for attention and interest 
on dramatizations involving two 
jmythical Clark executives — "Chief" 
and his wheezy assistant Fizbee. 

Humorous and semi-humorous sit- 
uations involve a running argument 
between the two on the best way to 
sell Clark Gasoline. The "Chief." a 
practical manufacturing type, plunks 
hard for the factual approach. Fizbee 
holds out for his own slogan brain- 
child, "Once you know, you go to 
Clark. ' Most dramatizations involve 
a third person, usually a character 
actor such as a Chinese restaurant 
owner, small boy, exasperated cus- 
: tomer, etc. 

Other prize winners, especially 
Coke and Ford, built heavy produc- 
tion values into their commercials, 
with name stars and musical groups 
adding bigness and importance to 
their one-minute radio efforts. 

Blair, until this fifth survey, had 
previously polled advertisers and 
agencies as well as listeners to deter- 
mine "best radio commercials." The 
first two categories were dropped be- 
cause resuhs showed that the pros 
and the listeners almost invariably 
agreed, and, says McCoy, because 
"advertisers are most interested in 
what potential customers think of 
their copy." 

One significant trend noted by 
SPOiNSOR: advertisers who use both tv 
and radio are now building special 
commercials for the audio medium. 
Even with the same theme, their treat- 
ments are tailored carefully for ra- 
dio use, and do not merely echo tv 
sound tracks. ^ 



THE TOP 10 RADIO CAMPAIGNS 
IN BLAIR POLL OF COMMERCIALS 



ACCOUNT 



AGENCY 



1 



CLARK'S SUPER 100 CAS TATHAM-LAIRD 

Clark Refinings dramatized spots with "Fizhee" and 
''Chief characters won most votes though only regional 



2 



COCA-COLA McCANN-ERlCKSON 

Name talent like McGuire Sisters, plus solid produc- 
tion values took runnerup place for Coca-Cola 



3 



FORD MOTOR J. WALTER THOMPSON 

Ford's "Swapping Bee' campaign used Rosemary 
Clooney, Tennessee Ernie Ford to give zip to radio spots 



4 



BALLANTINE BEER WILLIAM ESTY 

Special radio adaptation of Ballantine's tv theme — - 
"icely light-precisely right" ranked high ivith listeners 



5 



HOFFMAN BEVERAGES GREY 

Grey used dramatizations, straight copy and jingle 
to promote Hoffman's "Laughing Bubbles" campaign 



6 



PEPSI-COLA KENYON & ECKHARDT 

Pepsi's radio treatment of "The Sociables" theme 
showed important variations from its tv handling 



7 



EASTSIDE LAGER YOUNG & RUBICAM (LA) 

Y&R's West Coast office displayed high creativity for 
popular California beer with use of cappella voices 



8 



PIEL'S BEER YOUNG & RUBICAM (NY) 

Meanwhile, back on Mad. Ave., the agency devised 
ear-catching radio variations for Bert & Harry Piel 



9 



L & M CIGARETTES DF&S 

"They said it couldn't be done" with Jack Lescoulie. 
was only cigarette winner in radio's top 10 ranking 



10 



HAMM'S BEER CAMPBELL-MITHUN 

Northwest brewer's theme "From the land of the sky- 
blue waters" proved click with midwest listeners 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



37 



PART ONE OF A SERIES 



HOW TO PRE-SELL RADIO/TV 

^ Beginning here, a SPONSOR series exploring the reasons behind selling a radio oi 
tv buy to your own salesmen, wholesalers and retailers, with examples of how it is don« 




REASON WHY: U.S. Steel Co. produced an elaborate film (frame shown here) showing its more than 300,000 employees why it bought U. S. STEEL HOUR 



This week, sponsor begins a series 
on a subject that is mushrooming in 
advertising circles faster than an H- 
bomb explosion. Subject: How and 
ivhy buyers of air media campaigns 
enthuse their own sales people, whole- 
salers and retailers in advance of a 
radio/ tv push. This installment, deals 
with the reasons behind enthusing 
one's own sales staff. Others ivill treat 
the problems of exciting dealers and 
distributors. Through it all ivill run 
examples of hoiv advertisers, agencies, 
networks and stations collaborate to 
wring the most out of an air buy. 



■during the past weekend, top sales 
executives of the Quaker Oats Co. ■ 
across the country were called to the 
telephone, greeted by a sex-charged 
female voice that inquired whether a 
golf game was improving, a new 
sports cars was performing okay, or 
how sonny was getting along at Yale. 
If the salesman's wife answered the 
phone, she probably was jarred at 
hearing the same voice ask, "Is 
Chuck at home?" (What little fam- 
ily discussions this led to can only 
be imagined) . 

The caller was cover girl Tedi 



Thurman, NBC Radio's "Miss Moni- 
tor," and once she had covered the 
small talk such as golf scores or 
babies (information on each sales- 
man supplied by Quaker Oats head- 
quarters), she got down to the brass 
tacks of telling the salesman all about 
his company's air campaign on 
Monitor. 

This week, the sales force of Es- 
quire Shoe Polishes, are finding in- 
terest in their product running high 
among dealers and wholesalers, thanks 
to a contest offering 100 prizes 
topped by a trip for two to Europe 
aboard the S.S. United States. Con- 



38 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




HI, JOE: Last weekend, cover girl Tedi Thurman (NBC Radio's Miss 
Monitor) phoned sales executives of Qjaker Oats Co. across the 
country, chatted with them about Quaker's buy on MONITOR 



LOSED CIRCUITS ANO CONTESTS: Above, Ideal Toy Corp. holds tv closed circuit 
ales meeting in N.Y.C. area, finds 85% of retailers tuned in. Milton Caniff, creator 
f Steve Canyon, takes part. Below, Esquire Shoe Polishes promotes air campaign 
ifith dealer contest on how many viewers see Fall 1959 Esquire tv spots 



IVIONIT€»R 

LEATHER BUREAU 



ifl 



POWERHOUSE 
AD PROGRAM 

FOU 

ESQUIRE 






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testants (dealers, wholesalers and 
their employees ) must guess "how 
main people will see the fall '59 Es- 
quire tv spots." 

Two days ago. a contest for groc- 
ers closed; winner and his wife will 
have a trip down the Mississippi on 
the famed river boat Delta Queen 
with a four-day lay-over in New Or- 
leans for Mardi Gras. The contest 
was held by Best Foods Division of 
Corn Products to promote within the 
trade another kind of river boat — its 
buy on NBC TV's new River Boat 
Sunday night series. 

Sales personnel of U. S. Steel Co. 



have been getting to watch an elab- 
orate eight-and-one-half minute film 
titled "A Look At Tv." It was pro- 
duced by U.S. Steel especially for its 
internal organization to explain its 
investment in the U.S. Steel Hour on 
CBS TV and to show why a dramatic 
series was selected. 

These examples are only a few 
hors d'ouvres from a whole feast of 
promotional gimmicks which clients 
use to enthuse their sales organiza- 
tions and their retailers with air me- 
dia campaigns. To begin to estimate 
how many times an air campaign is 
the subject of a sales meeting, a 



house organ article, an internal sales 
letter, would be impossible, as would 
the amount of dollars spent national- 
ly in such promotion during a year. 

Why this mounting interest in 
"selling a radio or tv buy" to one's 
own sales people, to one's own whole- 
salers and retailers? What have ad- 
vertisers learned about getting the 
"most mileage" from an air invest- 
ment? SPONSOR sets out to explore 
this subject in a multi-part storv. 

"About the toughest thing in the 
world,' a veteran salesman told spon- 
sor, "is to excite the average sales- 
man about any advertising campaign. 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



39 



"The fact is," he went on, "we are 
traditionally apathetic to advertising. 
What a salesman first hears about 
his company investing a million in 
one kind of advertising or another, 
his first reaction is, 'Why don't they 
just spread that dough amongst us 
fellows, add it to our commissions?' 

"This isn't an inhuman reaction. 
It afflicts stockholders and other em- 
ployees. When a stockholder sees an 
expensive, four-color annual report, 
his first feeling is, 'Why didn't they 
print this cheaply and add the differ- 
ence to my dividend check?' 

"Salesmen," he continued, "who 
feel largely responsible for a com- 
pany's sales success are bound to re- 
gard — subconsciously, at least — ad- 
vertising as something of an inter- 
loper," 

"He's honest, at any rate," a client 
ad manager replied. "The company 
salesman is the first link in the sales 
chain. No product is successfully 
sold until the ultimate consumer 



planks down his money and carries 
it home. But the person directly re- 
sponsible for putting the product 
within the customer's reach is our 
salesman. 

"If it's worth our ad budget to 
make the customer want the product, 
then it's worth another investment to 
excite our salesman to the point 
where he enthuses the distributor and 
retailer about stocking the item, and 
what is more important — giving it 
front row display space." 

So the air inedia buy itself is only 
the beginning of a campaign. 

Consumer promotion of the show 
buy is a necessary adjunct; it builds 
the early audiences. But ahead of 
that comes the internal stimulation. 
Unless the prime movers are inspired, 
a campaign can collapse before it 
gets started. 

One of the problems attendant to a 
tv campaign ( no matter how success- 
ful it turns out to be among the rat- 
ing services reports) is that it is over 
and off the air in 30 or 60 minutes 



R«cord 

No. 0041 

of a 

Umited Edttion 
for Rsmbt4f 
OeaNirs Only 




GIMMICKS UNLIMITED! American Motors' Rambler has made a big dent in auto business through 
air advertising. Here is a record album for Rambler dealers and salesmen from NBC Radio 



and there is nothing left except wha 
remains in the mind of the viewer. A 
spot radio campaign, no matter hoA\ 
many impressions on the consumer 
can be even more ephemeral. It i^ 
conceivable that a food manufactur- 
er's salesman and the supermarket 
operator who stocks the product 
could both be completely ignorant of 
the reasons behind a customer de- 
mand inspired by radio or television 
commercials. 

With print media, it is relativelyj 
easy to send press proofs of the a 
vertisements along to salesmen, tear 
sheets of printed ads to retailers, 
This practice has been going on a 
long time, and unless the ads are 
something very much out of the ordl 
nary may only evoke a yawn. With 
an air campaign, the possibilities for 
early exploitation are endless. Here 
are involved big name stars, the 
drama of show business, the names of 
local personalities — and they are sud- 
denly there at the side of the sales- 
man or storekeeper helping to close 
a sale. 

"Showmanship . . . that's the one 
key to effective merchandising of ra- 
dio to your trade," Kevin Sweeney, 1 
president of Radio Advertising Bu- I 
reau, told SPONSOR. "And before you | 
say, 'platitude,' let me point out that 
its been a platitude for years — but ' 
nevertheless it's only recently that 
trade merchandising has been given i 
the true 'showmanship' treatment. 1 

"A major food company recently 
bought a radio saturation campaign 
with spots in 'fixed positions,' " Swee- 
ney said. "Company salesmen car- 
ried transistor portables, and timed 
their meetings with store buyers so 
they could tune in to the product's 
commercials right during the meet- 
ing. 

"Another radio advertiser sends 
transistor sets to key buyers in large 
markets along with an announcement 
schedule and covering letter. The let- 
ter urges the buyer to tune in and 
hear the product's spots on the air 
right at his desk. And, naturally, the 
letter provides an opportunity to 
pitch for better shelf display, more 
use of point-of-purchase material, and 
extra-quantity ordering 'to take com- 
plete advantage of this massive radio 
sales drive.' " ^ 



40 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



7 IN 10 REPS GET AGENCY ACCOLADE 



EXCELLENT 


GOOD 


FAIR 


POOR 


TERRIBLE 


11% 


57% 


28% 


2% 


2% 



1 , 



MOST AGENCY PEOPLE rate radio/tv reps who serve them as "excellent^' or 
''good," according to a sponsor survey. Although they have criticisms (see next two pages), 
they term most reps conscientious, professional, cooperative. The two-way relationship 
can mark success or failure of a campaign — and '60 is expected to be a record spot year. 



How agency people rate the reps 



^ Working relations of agency and representatives 
gain new focus as 1960 promises record year for spot 

"^ SPONSOR checks agency execs for appraisal of 
reps' work, which most term 'excellent' or 'good' 



'f\s 1959 comes to a close, agencies 
and clients are launching elaborate 
plans for what is expected to be a 
banner buying year in spot radio and 
tv. SPONSOR, within the past fortnight, 
checked agency media people on how 
they evaluate their relationship with 
station representatives — for their in- 
ter-action often keys the success or 
failure of a spot campaign. 

Their consensus: Seven in 10 
(68/( I think station reps are either 
"excellent" or "good" in performing 
the many duties and services required 
by staffers in an agency buying posi- 
tion. But, as spot business increases 
— and they predict it will — they stress 
the continuing need for more chink- 
filling in the cement which unites the 
representative, the agency and the 
client. 

A solid relationship, and one which 



continues to be strengthened, is the 
cohesive force among these three vital 
buying and selling elements, sponsor 
asked agency people how this rela- 
tionship can be strengthened and 
solidified in a mailed questionnaire 
to which 133 persons from much of 
the country responded. 

Full details of their response are 
printed in the charts at the top of 
this page and on pages 42 and 43. In 
summary, agency executives have 
these conclusions: 

• Sales: Representatives should 
give them more general market in- 
formation, they say. The current serv- 
ice on giving good availabilities with 
sufficient speed is considered fine as 
it now is, as are the number of visits 
made to an agency by the rep. But 
they want more specific station in- 
formation, pinpointed discussions and 



an increase of expert salesmen. 

• Research : Agency people asked 
for more rating information, station 
merchandising information, station 
program facts and market data. 
They'd like more competitive media 
information and more special pack- 
age rates. Reps, they say, are doing 
a good job on giving sufficient sta- 
tion personnel information and group 
sales data. 

• Promotion: They like these 
services as they are now performed : 
flip card, filmed and transcribed 
sales presentations, lunch and drink 
time selling. But they'd like to see 
the presentation of more all-industry 
data, an increase in the number of 
informal pitches and a greater num- 
ber of visits from station people. 

• Agency relations: Agency peo- 
ple prefer the status quo on such 
matters as the number of meals, cock- 
tail parties, semi-social affairs, pure- 
ly business affairs, station gifts and 
station contests. A significant per- 
centage of the respondents, however, 
would prefer to have more purely 
business functions and fewer station 
contests. 

The questionnaire included 15 pos- 
sible characteristics of reps, and 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



41 



agency people were asked to check 
each as to whether this was a strong 
or a weak point of service. Details 
appear on this page with the strong- 
est point "Serving us with avail- 
abilities promptly" — and the weakest 
— "Selling between buys rather than 
during them.' 

Most of the agency persons who 
answered the questionnaire are work- 



ecutives, 10: broadcast managers or 
directors, 9; associate media directors 
or broadcast directors, six; others, 
six. 

Answers came from Eastern and 
Midwest states, most from major 
metropolitan areas. Here is the 
breakdown: New York. 58; Chicago. 
19: Detroit. 12; Philadelphia, 11; 
Boston and St. Paul-Minneapolis, six 



I REPS' STRONG AND WEAK POINTS | 

I Most of the 133 agency executives from many parts of the U.S. answering SPONSOR'S | 

M questionnaire responded to this particular portion of it: a request that they checit M 

m the services in which station representatives are the strongest and the weakest* I 



g STRONGEST (in order) 

g Serving us with availabilities promptly. 

g Calling on the right agency people. 

g Working ethically and honestly. 

J Making frequent calls on media people. 

= Answering requests of a non-buying nature. 

g Giving up-to-date, needed information. 

W Providing compact, concise station information. 

I Selling competitively but without sour grapes. 



WEAKEST (in order) 



Selling between buys rather than during them. 
Doing an all-industry sales job. 
Coming up ivith imaginative buying ideas. 
Following up tvith help after the sale is made. 
Taking an active interest in client campaigns. 
Giving us authentic, reliable research figures. 
Giving everyone the same station and package rates. 



*"Stiongest" and "weakest" are use;! to designate rep services clieel<ecl for tliese cliaracterlstics by 
more than SOTe of tlie agency people responding to each of the 15 items on the cheek list. 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



ing directly in media selection. 

Of 129 designating their function 
and agency affiliation, 82 work in 
media, 27 on the executive staff, nine 
in radio and tv and 11 in other de- 
partments. The actual job classifica- 
tion analysis: media directors and 
supervisors, 44; buyers, 30; general 
executives, executive vice presidents 
and vice presidents, 24; account ex- 



each; St. Louis, five; Pittsburgh and 
Cleveland, three each; one each for 
Peoria, 111., Madison, Wis., Cincin- 
nati, Albany, N. Y., Buffalo, Syra- 
cuse. Baltimore, Rochester, N. Y.. 
Rockford, 111., Cedar Rapids, la. 

Here are some of the typical criti- 
cisms and commentaries: 

Personal attention : This makes 
the difference between a good and 



bad rep: the attention he's willing !i 
devote to an account problem. 1 
he's willing to go to bat not once bu 
twice, and sometimes more, to hel[ 
work out details, he'll get the bu- 
ness . . . Helen Davis, Clinton L 
Frank Co., Chicago. 

• Creative selling: There's a cry. 
ing need for creative selling rathei 
than having a station discussed onl) 
when avails are requested. Broad 
cast people should be able to recom 
mend buys. Many broadcast sales 
men have little or no market anc 
station knowledge . . . Jack Cherbo 
exec, v.p., Phillips & Cherbo. Chicago 

• More aggressiveness: The radio 
business has been content with too 
little share of the ad dollar. It coulq 
do with a little more of the aggres 
siveness found in newspaper repre-l 
sentation. Most radio reps are un- 
aware of the strength of their medi- 
um . . . John M. Keavey. v.p. 
EWR&R, New York. 

• Friendly but objective: The 
best reps are constantly trying to im- 
prove our schedules, operating on a 
personal and friendly but objective 
basis. Selling that allows us to see 
the individual characteristics of the- 
local market is helpful. But some of| 
the leading and most powerful sta-i 
tions are over-priced and do not] 
represent as good values as are avail- ( 
able on secondary stations. Over-t 
commercialization is a continuing 
problem . . . Ray Healy, med. dir,, 
Brown & Butcher, New York. 

• Bad buying time: One big ob- 
jection: when you are buying, es- 
pecially a heavy, intensive campaign,! 
all the reps want to come in and see 
you or are constantly calling on the. 
phone . . . Richard Olsen. buyer, I 
Wm. Esty, New York. 

• Visits: Station men visits are 
most valuable. But it takes a full 
day to come out here (90 miles west 
of Chicago) and most don't have the 
time . . . Norma Wren, buyer, How- 
ard H. Monk, Rockford, 111. 

• Cry babies: The level of in- 
tegrity has steadily gone up, but 
there are still reps (more radio than 
tv) who qualify as a disgrace to ad- 
vertising. They sell ojdy sour grapes, 
are seen only during a buying cycle 

{Please turn to page 66) 



42 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



AGENCY APPRAISAL OF FOUR VITAL REP SERVICES 

Most of the SPONSOR questionnaire sent to agency executives centered on four areas: the ap- 
praisal by media people of rep services in (1) Sales, (2) Research, (3) Promotion and 
(4) Agency relations. The four columns folloiving each service indicate the number of re- 
spondents wishing more of the service, less of the service, preferring the status quo — folloived 
by the total number of persons answering each point. Preferred stands are in bold face. 



1. SALES 



As Total As Total 

More Less is ans. More Less is ans. 



Agency visits by reps 37 4 85 126 Specific station info. 85 2 42 129 
General market info. 91 5 32 128 Pinpointed discussion 79 8 35 122 

Faster, better avails 12 — 44 56 Expert salesmen 92 1 34 127 



2. RESEARCH 



Station rating info. 65 4 49 118 Station personnel info. 35 7 81 123 

Station merchandising info. 89 3 36 128 Group sales info. 30 6 67 103 

Station program info. 79 1 44 124 Special package rates 82 3 38 123 

Market data 80 3 46 129 Competitive media info. 93 4 28 125 



3. PROMOTION 



Flip card pitches I6 51 59 126 Station men visits 6I 9 56 126 

Film presentations 29 34 61 124 Lunch, drink pitches 10 51 62 123 

Transcribed presentations 23 39 6I 123 Informal pitches 58 12 54 124 

Direct mail data 15 6I 49 125 All-industry data 90 3 34 127 



4. AGENCY RELATIONS 



Meals 10 29 86 125 Purely business affairs 58 1 62 121 

Cocktail parties 8 44 70 122 Station gifts 11 35 73 119 

Semi-social affairs 20 29 74 123 Station contests ]8 31 53 122 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Is: 



ONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 43 



■■■■■■ t-MMMMSBSSHUK^.^- 



STRATEGY is mapped out by (I to r) Warwick & Legler media supervisor Herb Gandel, v.p. and director of media Richard Bean, media buyer 
?ob Storrle, v.p. and account supervisor Barrett C, Dillow. Mennen alternated 60's, I.D.'s at half-hour intervals for concentrated impacti 



Why Mennen picked radio for men 



^ Toiletries manufacturer put all its weight into 20- 
week, 75-niarket campaign for five products in men's line 

^ Aim was 35-40% unduplicated homes in peak male 
listening times; early checks show sales up in key areas 



■ irst results are in on a 20-week, 
75-market radio campaign which 
since 13 July has been the sole adver- 
tising effort of the Mennen Co. for 
five products in its men's line. The 
current campaign runs to 28 Novem- 
ber, but already reports show up to 
75% sales hikes for some of the 
products. 

Products involved: Spray Deodor- 
ant, Stick Deodorant, Skin Bracer, 



Foam Shave, Quinsana. ( The last 
two products are handled by Grey 
Advertising, but to make bookkeep- 
ing less complicated Warwick & Leg- 
ler planned and scheduled the buys 
for all five products. I 

Warwick & Legler believes results 
of the campaigns are significant be- 
cause of the light they shed on the 
varying methods of radio buying to- 
day. "Rather than go after satura- 



tion frequency or work out rating 
point buys," says Richard Bean, v.p. 
and director of media at the agency, 
"we went after maximum undupli- 
cated reach, specifically concentrat- 
ing our buys in time periods that 
would give us efficient delivery of 
male impressions." 

"Strict devotion to a rating point 
concept," he says, "loses sight of the 
fact that male listening to radio is 
increased from 50 to 100% in the 6 
to 9 a.m., 4 to 6 p.m. periods. 
Through concentration in these peri- 
ods we were able to reach 35-40% of 
the homes in each market during 
peak male listening times." 

"High frequency of announcements 
in larger markets, lower frequencies 
in smaller markets gave us the same 



44 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



tiiivaleiU reach," Bean explains. 
liiiiie for the top four markets was 
! I 70 per week, the next 26 mar- 
iveraged 50, the balance rough- 
i;i to 30. depending on size. 
\ii()ther criterion was efficient cost. 
isic to the buy, was a group plan 
\ eloped for Mennen by Blair and 
lling for additions to the schedule 
\iat brought the total up to 102 sta- 
)ns covering 75 markets. 
Where it was possible to reach one- 
ird of the homes in every market 
least once a week on one station, a 
igle-station buy was used. "In 
me cases," says media supervisor 
erb Gandel, "we had to add a sta- 
)n to achieve this penetration." 
If cost made both morning and af- 
rnoon exposure unfeasible, the 6 to 
a.m. period got the nod in order 
get a once-every-half-hour expo- 
ire of either an I.D. or a 60-second 
inouncement. 

Method of scheduling also reflected 
e concentrated nature of Mennen's 
1-out reliance on spot radio. A 60- 
cond announcement for a product 
alternate one half-hour periods 
'ith an I.D. in the next half hour. 
' Sixty-second announcements for 
i,ich product have a theme that can 
•i easily crystallized into an I.D. 
hus. the balladier singing "Get 
jfennen Skin Bracer — It's good for 
lour face, sir" in an I.D., is recalled 
oni the longer 60-second announce- 
lent which carried the same lines 
,nd may have run a half hour earlier. 
Alternating 60's with I.D.'s. how- 
ter, depended in large measure on 
:ation rates for these lengths, accord- 
ig to Gandel. In cases where I.D.'s 
ere one half the minute rate, fewer 
ere used than where the three-to- 
ne rate applied. 

To capitalize on this alternating 
vstem of announcement lengths, 
lennen rotates the five products 
irough the week rather than through 
le day. Thus, each morning or after- 
oon schedule is devoted by and large 
) a single product. "This is addi- 
onally helpful," says Bean, "to a 
roduct which gets lesser frequencv 
1 the over-all schedule." Frequency 
3r each product depends on its share 
f the total budget. 



Because Mennen was throwing the 
entire weight of its advertising for 
the five products into radio for 20 
weeks, both consumer and trade pro- 
motion at the local level were con- 
sidered indispensable. Several tech- 
niques were used : 

( 1 ) Kickoff luncheon for the trade. 
Awareness of drug and supermarket 
chain buyers, wholesale drug buyers 
and rack jobbers was vital, says W&L 
a.e. Jack Thompson. To indoctrinate 
them with the why and wherefors 
of the radio schedule, each of the sta- 
tions in the Blair plan held a kickoff 
luncheon or similar get-together for 
the trade — virtually a "first" for a 
station grouping of that size, claims 
the representative firm. Bean reports 



that some other stations on the sched- 
ule followed the Blair lead. Mennen 
considered the luncheons a highly 
productive device, according to 
Thompson. 

(2) Contest to spur station promo- 
tion. When we decided on a contest 
among program managers," says 
Bean, "for the most imaginative on- 
the-air promotion of the Mennen 
schedule, we knew we were dealing 
with a hot issue. True, many sta- 
tions frankly said they preferred not 
to enter, but we were gratified to get 
a .50% response, which we consider 
excellent." Entries are almost all in 
now. and judging, by impartial broad- 
cast trade members, begins soon. 
(Please turn to page 74 J 



WHIPPING UP THE DRUG BUYERS 




PROMOTION was vital to Mennen's campaign. Here, 
WOW sales manager Bill Wiseman (standing) hosts top 
wholesale and chain drug buyers in Omaha at luncheon 
prior to campaign kickoff. Pitch emphasized products (sur- 
rounding map), coverage, strategy (reaching one-third of 
homes in peak male listening hours), promotion support. 
Get-togethers for drug buyers were standard with all sta- 
tions in Blair Group plan, which was basic buy in campaign 



PONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



45 



Tv supports Supp-Hose better 



^ Hosiery manufacturer with dual copy problems- 
health plus fashion— got lopsided reaction from print 

^ So it switched to net and spot tv, aimed dual pitch 
at specific targets, got total distribution in 18 months 



I his week, spot tv schedules break 
in 21 markets for Supp-hose, adding 
strength to a hefty schedule of net- 
work participations already under- 
way. Footage for the commercials 
was shot at fashion shows in Paris 
(see cut below). 

None of this would have seemed 
either practical or within reach 
money-wise two years ago, when the 
product was limping off to a slow 
start. But, 18 months later, after care- 
fully-tended tv exposure, Supp-hose 
holds a strong franchise in virtually 



every nylon counter in the country. 

At first, the product's two strong- 
est selling points counteracted each 
other. On one hand, Supp-hose was 
pitching support for the legs. On the 
other, were such features as fashion 
rightness, glamour, sheerness, made 
of nylon — words that had never been 
associated with a support hose. 

"We felt that tv could reconcile the 
conflict," says Charles Goldschmidt, 
partner of Daniel & Charles, "but we 
knew we'd have to feel our way — for 
several reasons that are basic to a 



harmonious relationship between sof 
goods and tv." (In point of fact, tht 
agency's rise in seven years to nearljl 
$10 million in billings can be tracec 
in large measure to cementing thii 
very relationship.) 

"Print schedules in national maga 
zines," says Goldschmidt, "simply 
weren't balancing the two sides of the 
copy scale for us. Yet to a retailer, 
a print ad is acceptable evidence you 
are serious about selling, whereas 
he's inclined to feel a tv schedule if 
merely designed to overwhelm him 
with glamour to get goods placed.' 

Before tv could be successful as a| 
selling medium for Supp-hose, retail-j 
ers had to be convinced that: 

• tv was the selling, not the mer- 
chandising, leverage , 

• advertising tied into tv sched-i 
ules could be effective. 

"We made no attempt to run an 



WHEN YOU ADVERTISE SOFT GOODS ON TV 




DON'T EMPHASIZE GI^MOUR. Show soft goods retailer you are using tv 
to sell, not to overwhelm him with glamour to place goods, ivarns Charles 
Goldschmidt, partner in Daniel & Charles) ad agency. Goldschmidt also advises: 



WORK ON MERCHANDISE MANAGERS. Get selling end of store behind 
you by pointing up benefits of tv and value of tie-in advertising to merchandise 
managers. Get them to work on unenthusiastic store advertising departments 



GET SALES FORCE PARTICIPATION. Acquaint salesmen with spot 
schedule. Get them to call attention to announcements on the air while they 
are making a call. This familiarity gives real credibility to a television campaign 



DON'T WASTE TV EXPENDITURES. Small-budget advertisers should 
emphasize demonstration, rather than tiaste money attempting carry-over of a 
print theme. Resemblance to other media is not as vital as demonstration on tv 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



'ntire campaign riglil off the bat," 
avs Goldschmiflt. "Instead we went 
ito two top markets first, then we 
, dded a number of smaller markets. 
Ij "In the large markets we scheduled 
lO spots a week, 60's and 20's. Later 
e eliminated the 20's in favor of 
'lling a full story, clearly balancing 
ashion and health. We went after 
ivo targets: older women and work- 
iig women. This meant daytime and 
linge time placements. Our daytime 
IP s were made adjacent to programs 
, ith audiences consisting predomi- 
lanth of older women — soap operas, 
,(uiz shows, Godfrey, etc." 
' "To add weight to our contention 
hat tv was intended as a selling force, 
alcsmen were thoroughly acquainted 
vith the spot schedules," says Gold- 
[tchmidt. "This enabled us to show 
Sierchandising managers what we 
vere doing. In fact, we soon learned 
hat the most effective way to sell the 
.vorth of a tv schedule is through the 
'nan who can feel its effect on sales, 
-"ressure from a determined merchan- 
■lising manager can sway the most 
Ijrint-bound advertising department." 

"As sales and distribuiton in the 
est markets rose," says Goldschmidt, 
'we had an additional selling point. 
By fall of 1958 we were in tv in 10 
markets. Then, as these local mar- 
kets began to get support from re- 
tailer advertising, we were able to 
?ut our spot schedules about in half 
and begin adding network tv." 

The local pattern was duplicated in 
the network activity. First buy was 
aimed at older women {Godfrey on 
CBS TV) , later branched out to reach 
both that age group and vounger as 
.veil as working women. {Jimmy Dean 
on CBS TV was added in afternoon, 
jack Paar on NBC TV in late eve- 
ning. I Current schedule calls for 
jalternate week participations in 
\Treasure Chest on NBC TV, Young 
Dr. Malone on NBC TV, both day- 
time, and Paar continued for late 
evening coverage. Spot frequency 
averages 21 spots per week in the 21 
tv markets, distributed in morning, 
afternoon and late evening times. 

Basically, Supp-hose is after credi- 
bility in the merchandising of its ad- 
vertising to stores. It's after the same 
thing in its appeal to consumers. On 
{Please turn to page 70) 




PRE-SPORTS SHOW sponsorship gives Clyde Wallichs (I), Ivlusic City president, a chance to 
chat with star Danny Kaye ■from press box of L.A. Coliseum preceding recent Dodger games 



10 YEARS WITH RADIO— 
A $4 MILLION BUSINESS 



I 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



n 1949. a Hollywood record shop, 
located at the corner of Sunset & 
Vine, had a radio budget of S12.000. 
Gross sales that year totaled .$300,- 
000. Last season — a decade later — 
Music City's radio budget had grown 
to $225,000; its gross sales to $4 mil- 
lion (including a new store in nearby 
Lakewood opened in 1956). 

The story behind this growth was 
told to SPONSOR by Music City presi- 
dent Clyde Wallichs. 

"We got into radio because we 
felt our small print space was lost be- 
side the large department store 
spreads," said Wallichs. "So we set 
out to find a medium that would 
make us look big, rather than puny, 
next to big-budget advertisers. 

Radio, he felt, would give his 
schedule a chance to stand out im- 
portantly alongside the advertising 
of companies with more to spend. 
He decided to test his theory with a 
schedule of 30-second announcements 
throughout the day on weekdays. 

His first schedule was placed on 
KMPC, Los Angeles. Careful store 
checks were made. It didn't take 
Wallichs long to discover that one- 
third of Music City sales was coming 
from radio. 

"When we saw that. ' he said, "we 
gave up print completely. News- 



paper ads, in many cases reach peo- 
ple who are not interested in records. 
In fact, they may not even like music. 
But a listener tuned in to the stations 
we buy time on is obviously interest- 
ed in our product or he wouldn't be 
tuned in." 

Currently. Music City uses spots 
and programs on 11 L.A. stations. 
This strategy gives it a stature in 
radio as big as department stores 
hold in newspapers. 

Music City has a weekly "display 
ad" on KMPC via 15-minute remotes 
from the press box of the L.A. Coli- 
seum prior to all home games of both 
the Dodgers and L.A. Rams. For 
continuity. Wallichs buvs the 15 min- 
utes just after each "away" game. 
While it is filled primarily with 
music, scores are usually recapped 
in the segment. 

Small "reminder ads ' are run in 
30-second spots on 1 1 stations. On 
KMPC. for example. 60 spots a 
month are used, at a cost of SI. 100. 

Summed up. Music City found how 
to pinpoint an audience with radio. 
As Merv Oakner. a.e. at Anderson- 
McConnell. Music City's agency, puts 
it: "Radio brings a quality audience 
into Wallichs shop and enables him 
to maintain fair trade retail list in 
an era flourishing with discount 
operations." ^ 



47 



KOL 



IS OGarCf6> number 3 in a seri 



es 







An annual city-wide Easter egg hunt, a human 

"Univac" who received national attention, and 

a rain dance that ended Seattle's three-month 

drought. These are just a few of the imaginative 

events dreamed up and carried out by KOL's 

popular D. J.s. And incidentally, have netted 

them Seattle's largest and most loyal audience. 






KOL 






See your Boiling Co. Rep. -ask about Spokane's terrific buy-KLYK 



48 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 195 



RADIO RESULTS 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



BANK 

AGENCY: Scott M. Roberts Inc. SPONSOR: Merchants & Farmers Bank 



HOUSES 

.'■ONSOR: Cross Slates 
Construction 

iipsule case history: 10,000 people braved a torrential 
iwnpour on 19 October to attend opening day ceremonies 
. Tangelo Park, near Orlando, Fla., in response to Cross 
ilis Construction's radio campaign for its new housing 
';velopment. The firm reported sale of all its 98 homes 
at weekend and attributed the success entirely to radio. 
;ott M. Roberts, Inc., of St. Petersburg, its promotion di- 
eters, had purchased 85 announcements on each of 
rlando's three stations, WLOF, WHOO and WHIY, in a 
e-opening drive. Saturation was continuous, using 300 spots 
;r week to promote Tangelo Park. All spots were taped, 
iith a predominantly soft-sell pitch and heavy mood music 
' background. Theme of "Never before so much house 
ith so many plus features" was the firm's hardest sell, 
he sponsors thought that the heavy rain would seriously 
urt the campaign, but the radio impact was so great that 
didn't deter the thousands who flocked to Tangelo Park. 
.1>0F, WHOO and WHIY, Orlando, Fla. Announcements 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: The Merchants and Farmers Bank, a 
medium-sized institution in Portsmouth, Virginia, tradi- 
tionally hadn't used radio as an advertising medium. How- 
ever, in line with a recent trend, it purchased a schedule on 
WAVY, Norfolk-Portsmouth, to proinote new business in 
the checking account department. The results of the radio 
flight were immediately apparent. After the announcements 
had been running only a short time, the bank experienced 
the best month in its entire history for opening new check- 
ing accounts. "We feel now, without any hesitance, that our 
radio programs handled through WAVY radio have con- 
tributed greatly to the increased number of checking ac- 
counts," said C. E. Adams, executive v. p. "Particularly ef- 
fective has been the portion of our program in which Kirk 
Webster has plugged our personalized checks. He has done 
a wonderful job in helping promote our bank on his pro- 
gram." The bank plans to continue using radio indefinitely. 

WAVY, Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va. Announcements 



'URNITURE 

PONSOR: Saunders Home Center AGENCY: Direct 

)apsule case history: Saunders Home Center, Grabill, 
nd., placed a schedule on WOWO that produced the highest 
ales the store has ever known. Announcements were simple, 
Iraight hard sell without sound effects or dialogue. In a 
liree-week period — on a total expenditure of only $990.70 
■n WOWO— the store sold $45,000 in furniture. This was 
hirty-three and a third percent better than any other similar 
leriod in the store's history; over $5,000 a week more than 
ny other period. Sales slips showed that WOWO attracted 
ustomers from three states. These results are even more 
ignificant since Saunders is a furniture dealer in a small 
ommunity of 350, way off the regular highway. Store ap- 
earance, though it sells well-known and quality merchan- 
lise, is that of a general store. Saunders, himself, has since 
eported, "WOWO increased our business 41% over last 
ear's, and last year was a record high for 25 years." 
^'OWO, Fort Wayne, Ind. Announcements 



HOUSEHOLD FRANCHISES 

SPONSOR: Royal Vv ax A(;ENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Royal Wax proved that radio can 
sell a highly specialized product and line to a mass audience. 
Equally important, it showed that a high-priced line can be 
proinoted successfully on radio. In this case. Royal decided 
to sell its floor waxes via franchises to individuals. Each 
franchise cost $700 and Royal found a big ready market 
on WPOP, Hartford. The firm began with 24 spots per 
week, using an equal budget in other media. The first week 
alone it realized a $37,000 profit, and outdrew other niedia 
six to one on a dollar basis. Royal then increased the 
schedule to 48 spots per week and finally to 100. Expansion 
of Royal's operation was so successful that it tripled staff 
and office space in a six-week period and at one point had 
to take a one-week hiatus to catch up on sales. Sam Miller, 
of Roval Wax, credits WPOP for 72% of its sales, which 
exceeded $120,000 the first six weeks of its operation. 

^'POP, Hartford Announcements 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



49 



As radio buying becomes more complex, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What should timebuyers I 

kno^A^ about your markets 




Radio men point out social and 
economic patterns and market 
peculiarities in their cities that 
buyers should take into account 

Chris Robinson, national sales mgr., 
KXYZ, Houston 
The Houston market, ranking 16th 
by population in the United States, 
doesn't get by-passed by many im- 
portant radio or tv buys. But popu- 
lation alone does not tell the storv. 



Sunday impor- 
tant grocery- 
buying day 
in Houston 



In geographical area, metropolitan 
Houston ranks second only to Los 
Angeles. It's consistently in the Top 
Four in building permits for private 
homes and rental property. 

A check of several large moving 
companies reveals that 10 families 
move to Houston for every one that 
leaves. 

To serve Houston's spawning pop- 
ulation, many huge suburban shop- 
ping centers have been constructed 
and plans are laid for many more. 

Another marketing phenomenon 
that cannot be overlooked is the 
1.400-plus "ice houses" or drive-in 
groceries. These small but complete 
stores, open 16 hours a day, do a 
tremendous Saturday and Sunday 
business in canned goods, dairy prod- 
ucts, soft drinks, beer, bread, and 
cigarettes. Sunday is as big a day as 
Saturday and gives an extra day of 
grocery shopping that traditional ad- 
vertising patterns will not cover. 

Reaching a fluid population that 
shops in an unusual pattern requires 
close coordination between advertis- 
ing and marketing. 

The timebuyer has to know what 
economic strata must be reached, for 



Houston stations are clearly stratified 
in the groups they program for. 

Among the major Houston radio 
stations, three are high in teen lis- 
teners, one is noted for rural cover- 
age, which it woos with strong farm 
programing. One station completed 
an extensive and intensive survey 
which showed its audience was made 
up of senior citizens. Another is 
strong in the 25- to 40-year age group. 

Houston is a city of good radio 
stations, but quite plainly the market 
peculiarities and strong individual 
characteristics of each station make 
buying decisions difficult. 

The solution lies in using close an- 
alysis as the key to more profitable 
radio and tv schedules in our market. 

Murray Woroner, station mgr., 
WAME, Miami 
The fabulous Gold Coast of Flori- 
da is made up of dollar-fertile Dade 
& Broward counties. Like its count- 
erpart this market is an area of con- 
tradictions and untold wealth, that 



Miami s tastes, 
habits similar 
lo northern 
cities 



keeps increasing by leaps and bounds. 

Hub of the fabulous Gold Coast is 
metropolitan Miami. Located in the 
Deep South, it must be classified a 
northern city with a southern accent. 
The tastes, habits, likes and dislikes, 
of the majority of the audience mak- 
ing up this market are mostly similar 
to New York and Chicago. LInlike 
many southern cities, the Negro audi- 
ence accounts for only 10% of Mi- 
ami's population. But to add to its 
cosmopolitan complexion, Latin 
Americans account for another 10%. 

Adding to the luster of the Gold 
Coast is its golden sunshine climate. 
This encourages greater use of car 




and portable radios, making Miar 
the epitome of the RAB phrast 
"Wherever you go, there's radio. 

Timebuyers concerned with Mian 
should avoid the old seasonal concep 
With hotels, entertainment industrie 
and business in general booming tl 
year round these days, two things ai 
apparent: the more than one millio 
permanent residents don't hibernate 
and the tourist flow continues througi 
the summer months. i 

One extra advantage offered timt 
buyers is the introduction of summe 
use products to the more than 150,00 
tourists a day in Miami during th 
winter months, 80% of whom trave 
by car. These people, exposed to nen 
summer products, carry the demam 
for these commodities home wit! 
them, thus giving the national camj 
paign an extra early impetus. [ 

To sum up, it would be well to rej 
member that we have a northern cit^ 
in a southern location. A combing 
tion of urban, suburban, tropical liy 
ing. enhanced with industrial devel 
opmeni and augmented by tourism 
We are an area whose radio audienci 
owes no prolonged loyalty to on( 
station or another, a market in whici 
the buyer must exercise care, stud) 
trends, and late developments, to 
make the best buy for his client. 

Charles E. Gates, sales mgr., fTGNl 

Chicago 
Chicago is a robust, high income 
market. Annual income per house- 
hold is $7,427, or 23.7%, above the 
national average. The six-county 
metropolitan area has a total employ- 



Chicago is both 
a cosmopolitan 
and rural 
market 




^ if 



tfrfe 



ment of three million ; and more than 
90% work days. Basic working hours 



50 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



f approximately <S:3() a.m. to 5 
111., and high traffic hours are from 
.0 to 9 a.m. and from 4 to 6 p.m. 
< liicago has diversified industries. 
I'liiad economic hase. Of the labor 
ii(f. a maximum of l.'^'( is em- 
u\("d in any one industry, substan- 
ill\ less than the 23% average for 
If nation's 10 largest cities. 
Chicago embraces a variety of eth- 
- roups, with a high percentage of 
' i.iid-generation members. Many of 
iiM' aroups form ethnic communities 
■ithin the city, such as Italian, Greek, 
olish and German. The largest min- 
il\ group is Negro. 
Chicago area population is a mix- 
ire of cosmopolitan and rural. It is 
l|ie nation's second largest market, 
'ifving the nation's major farm area. 
': is established as a continental cen- 
[T of business, finance, education, 
'ulture and transportation. It is the 
'ation s largest railroad center, has 
he nation's busiest airports — and. 
f ith the opening of the St. Lawrence 
leaway. promises to be the nation's 
'irgest seaport in the near future. 

It s a sports-minded city, attracts 
|iiIlions of visitors every year and is 
most popular convention site. Chi- 
'ago is the only citv at this time sup- 
porting two major league baseball 
Isams and two national professional 
''ague football teams. 

ohn Box, Jr., exec. v.p. and managing 
dir., WIL, St. Louis 
The one-time "Dowager Queen" of 
he Mississippi River — St. Louis — has 
indergone changes in the past five 
ears that are of the utmost import- 



Big competition 
between down- 
town and subur- 
ban St. Louis 



ince to every timebuyer. Massive 
ivic improvement projects and tre- 
nendous industrial growth have 
haken the market out of the com- 
)lacency of its historic past into a 
estyled competitive present. 

As with many other major cities, 
5t. Louis is engaged in a healthy bat- 
(Please turn to page 72 I 





TODAY. ..THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A RADIO STATION IS MEASURED BY THE 
AMOUNT OF GOODS IT SELLS. And in Sacramento, KXOA sells more cars and related 
products because it reaches, influences and appeals to more people. Rated first (Pulse, Mar.- 
Apr. '59 and Hooper, June-July-Aug.'59) the right combination of personalities, programming, 
promotions and power keep KXOA on top throughout the prosperous Sacramento Valley, 
now 20th in Retail Sales per Household (SRDS). KXOA sells more of everything, because 
it reaches and influences more people. 

KXOA-FJrst in Sacramento, California's Capital 




PONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 19.59 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY DAREN F. McGAVREN CO., INC. MEMBER, CAL-VAL GROUP 



51 



' . I 




I 



I 



ALWAYS... 
a jump ahead 



The vibrant enthusiasm of 
staying a jump ahead of our 
contemporaries is a vital part 
of all personnel at KONO 
in San Antonio. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
listeners' ears keenly tuned 
to the times . . . for first 
in news . . . finest in music. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
San Antonio's largest radio 
audience buying at fever pitch . . 
day after day. 

For remarkable facts about the 
"jump-ahead" KONO . . . see your 

KATZ AGENCY 

REPRESENTATIVE 

5000 Watts • 860 KC 




JACK ROTH, Mgr. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



52 




National and regional buy. 
in work now or recently complelet 



lr%Jf I ESU YSi 



TV BUYS 

American Tobacco Co., New York: Schedules of prime time I.D.'s 
for Lucky Strike begin fourth week in October in every market in 
the U.S. except the following areas: N. D., S. D., Idaho, Mont., Wye, 
Utah, Wash., Ore., Calif. Run is till the end of the year and might 
be extended to 52 weeks. Buyer: Hope Martinez. Agency: BBDO,; 
New York. 

Andrew Jergens Co., Cincinnati: Going into about 75 markets for 
Jergens Lotion starting 25 October. Day and late night minutes are 
being placed for 10 weeks. Buyer: Gary Pranzo. Agency: Cunning- 
ham & Walsh, Inc., New York. 

Pharma-Craft Corp., Inc., Cranbury, N. J.: Initiating the first 
series of flights in cold-weather areas for Coldene. Starting date is 
25 October for 10 weeks with minutes and 20's. Buyer: Gloria Ma- 
haney. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

Monarch Wine Co., Inc., Brooklyn: Fall campaign for Manische- 
witz Wine kicks off in top markets 22 October for seven weeks and' 
in lesser ones, 29 October for eight weeks and 5 November for nine 
weeks; about 50 markets altogether. Prime time minutes, 20's and 
I.D.'s are being used, frequencies varying. Buyer: Gail Sessions. 

Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., Div. of Lever Bros., Hoboken: A schedule 
of daytime minutes for its soups starts 1 November for 21 weeks. 
Daytime minutes are being set in about 25 markets. Buyer: Lor- 
raine Ruggiero. Agency: Young & Rubicam, New York. 

Schick Inc., Lancaster, Pa.: The second portion of the total station 
list starts fourth week of October for its shavers and runs till 20 De- 
cember. Placement is for night minutes and chainbreaks, frequencies 
varying. Buyer: Sam Haven. Agency: Benton & Bowles, Inc., 
New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., New York: Campaign for Duke 
cigarettes expanding to 17 markets. Minutes, chainbreaks and I.D.'s 
start late October and early November for four weeks, with market 
frequencies ranging from 60 to 250 per week. Buyer: Ginny Con- 
way. Agency : McCann-Erickson, Inc., New York. 

Standard Brands Inc., New York: Getting off Regular Chase & 
Sanborn coffee schedules fourth week in October. Flight is for four 
weeks; daytime minutes and some chainbreaks. Buyer: Jayne Shan- 
non. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

Chap Stick Co., Div. of Morton Mfg., Lynchburg, Va.: Setting up 
its campaign for Chap Stick and Chap-Ans using traffic and some 
before 1 p.m. dav minutes in top markets. 13-week schedules start 
this month and early November. Buyer: Anita Wasserman. Agency: 
Lawrence C. Gumbinner A. A., Inc., New York. 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




is where you find it,«« 




...and nowhere on Chicago tele- 
vision will you find the kind of 
exciting programming WBKB 
gives you! WBKB was Chicago's 
first channel and it's still first in 
special community events cover- 
age in this dynamic, exciting, big- 
buying market! Yessir, whenever 
there's something exciting going 
on around here, Chicagoans auto- 
matically tune in Channel 7. They 
know only WBKB serves the public 
with on-the-spot coverage of 
exciting events like these: 

Excitement! The Pan American 
Games. ..exclusive daily program 
coverage! 

Excitement ! The National Clay Courts 
Tennis Championships at River Forest! 

Excitement! Illinois State High School 
Basketball Championship Tournament ! 



Excitement! World's richest open golf 
tournament at Gleneagles! 

Excitement! The Illinois State Inquiry 
into the Orville Hodge Scandal! 

Excitement! The Eve of the visit of 
Queen Elizabeth. ..exclusive special 
program! 

Excitement! The Annual St. Luke's 
Fashion Show... one of society's most 
glittering events! 

These were exclusive WBKB tele- 
casts. But what happened when 
WBKB participated in the pool 
telecast of the arrival of Queen 
Elizabeth? WBKB carried off by 
far the top ratings ! Why ? Chicago- 
ans automatically turn to WBKB 
for excitement! 

If you want Chicagoans to grow 
more excited about your product, 
plant it in the flourishing climate 
ofthe excitement station. ..WBKBI 



WBKB 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



the 




station, channel 



□ 



owned and operated by the ABC Television Network 

53 




NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



"NIGHT AT THE RACES," WRTF-TVs promotion tor NBC fall lineup, drew 10,000 to 
Wheeling Downs, W. Va. Feature race, "WTRF-TV-NBC Showboat of Shows," was personified by 
Connie Hughes (I), shown awarding trophy to winning owner, as station staffers look on 




RED'S FOR COLOR! Looking like a mighty proud owner. Red Skelton finalizes $500,000 pur- 
chase of the world's first mobile color tv tape recording studio. With him: (I to r) his bus. 
mgr., Charles Luftig; Robert Cochran, G.E. dist. mgr., L.A.; William Wallace, Ampex sales rep 




ADVERTISERS 



Lever Bros, has got its foot ii 
the door of the frozen food in 
dustry by the acquisition of : 
small New York operation, Din 
ner-Redy Corp. 

The taker-over which is now u.*iii; 
radio spots in the east and south, i 
with Harold J. Siesel Co.. New Ymk 

General Foods elected, this week 
Charles Mortimer, chairman anc 
Wayne Marks, president of tht 
corporation. 

Mortimer, who has been with Gt 
since 1928 and president since 1954^ 
will continue as chief executive offi- 
cer of the company. Marks joined 
GF in 1926, and has been executive 
v.p. since 19.58. i 

Also promoted, three v.p.s to ex- 
ecutive v.p.'s: Herbert Cleaves. C. W, 
Cook and John Sargent. j 

^ I 

Monsanto Chemical Co. joins the 

list of advertisers combining ad- 
vertising, corporate marketing 




NO SELL needed for this package! She's 
Ruby Renaut, who was voted "Miss tv Com- 
mercial of 1959" in a recent poll taken by 
Robert Lawrence Productions of Toronto 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



■search and district sales office 
iordination into a single staff 
ipartment — the marketing services 
(partmeiil. 

It will be lieaded 1>) William Far- 
ill, who has been director of the 

Mitising department. Edmund 
I een becomes associate director; 
'illiam Lang, manager of industrial 

-iLin; and John Moran, manager of 
.-liict office coordination. 

• inipaign: Tidy House Products 

'».. a heavy spot tv buyer in the past, 
II spend more than $1 million this 
i-<in to advertise its grocery Prod- 
is ill 18 midwest states via its own 
If-hour program. Polka Parade, in 
markets. Agency: Guild. Bascom 

.Bonfigli, San Francisco. 

Iiisa 'n' data: George Abrams, 

isident of the Hudnut-DuBarry- 
.lortsman division of Warner-Lam- 
rt has coined a new word for cos- 
llis and toiletries: "Charmaceu- 
i-als" . . . Don Herbert, star of 
BC TV's Watch Mr. Wizard, will 
i>t Ask Your Doctor, a new regional 



network medical tv series sponsored 
by Merck Sharp & Dohme divi- 
sion of Merck & Co. . . . INew prod- 
uct: From the Adell Chemical Co., 
makers of Lestoil — Lestare, a dry 
bleach packet. 

Strictly personnel: Ralph Linder, 

a v.p. and director of Donahue & 
Coe, moves to Colgate as general 
products manager of the household 
products division . . . Kenneth 
Tashjy, to advertising manager of 
Callaway Mills . . . Alexis Konde, 
to director of international marketing 
for Pharma-Craft . . . Richard Sar- 
gent, to head the new Westinghouse 
portable appliance division. 



AGENCIES 



Boyle Midway, a division of 
American Home Products, has 
reallocated some of its products 
— taking them from Geyer, 
Morey, Madden & Ballard. 

J. W. Thompson, the house for 
BM's Aero-Shave, Black Flag and 



Sani-F"lush, is scheduled to gel Aero- 
wax and Wizard deodorizers. 

Ted Bates & Co., the Whitehall 
Labs, division agency, is scheduled to 
get Easy -Off oven cleaner and Griffin 
shoe polishes. 

Boyle Midways billings for these 
products are about $5 million. 

(". J. LaRoche & Co. hired two 
marketing executives last week. 

F. Winslow Stetson, most recent- 
ly v.p. and management representa- 
tive of Necdham, Louis & Brorb; , 
has been named v.p. and marketing 
director. 

S. Cecil Bernsley, named a "mar- 
keting executive"' comes to LaRoche 
from the marketing department at 
Ted Bates. 

Agency appointments: Jacob 
Ruppert, brewer of Knickerbocker 
Beer, with a 1960 budget at S4 mil- 
lion, from Compton to Norman, 
Craig & Kummel . . . Ex-Cell-0 
Corp., for its Pure Pack division, to 
MacManus, John & Adams . . . 
The newly-formed Dodge Dealer ad- 



■ ' t 



kTELLITE STUDIO, new WWDC (Wash., 
C.) radio concept, gets sendoff from 
ginia Pailes (Miss Washington of 1959), 
\. Fred Fislte (in studio) and (I to r) sta- 
in's pres. Ben Strouse, v.p. Ross Seville 




)0D FOR LISTENERS. WKRC's seven-day 
ow in Cincinnati Gardens featured products 
Ivertised through station's radio/tv media, 
ostessing: popular tv personality Jane Lynn 





"WAGON TRAIN" goes north. 
Borrowing show title, WICU-TV, 
Erie, Pa. participated in Western 
Ontario Fair. With native model 
(l-r): sta. prom. mgr. W. Babcocic, 
Canad. gen. sis. mgr., D. Campbell 



PHILLY'S NEW FILLUP, Chev- 
rolet's compact Corvair, gets one- 
week promotion by WPEN's morn- 
ing personality Jack O'Reilly, who 
tours Greater Phila. With staffers 
Linda Nikazy, Janet Melchiore 




WHEELING 

37t*h TV 

MARKET 

One Station Sells Big 
Booming Ohio Valley 

No. 14 in a Series 

About the Diversified 

Upper Ohio River Valley: 

PIPE COUPLINGS 




The world's largest independent manu- 
facturer of Pipe Couplings is the proud 
boast of the Wheeling Machine Prod- 
ucts Company of Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, an important element in the in- 
dustrial picture of the WTRF-TV area. 
Since 1918 the "X-L" trademarked 
Wheeling products — Pipe Couplings and 
Nipples, Water Well Drive Points, Drive 
Shoes and Drive Caps, Bushings, Plugs 
and Plastic Fittings have been shipped 
throughout the world. Important to 
those with products to sell is the |3 
million annual payroll of Wheeling — a 
potent part of the $2% billion spend- 
able income enjoyed by the 2 million 
people in the 36-county WTRF-TV area. 

For complete merchandising service and 
availabilities, call Bob Ferguson, VP 
and General Mgr., at CEdar 2-7777. 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Company 



wtrf 111 



Wheeling 7, West Vo.^'^k^ 

316,000 watts i|^ Q Q network color 



vertising group of Washington, D. C. 
to Grant, bringing to over 30 the 
number of Dodge Dealer groups 
served by the agency . . . Dunhill, 
Inc. of Weston, Mass., for its Rol-Zon 
line of pet care items, to Ritter, 
Sanford, Price & Chalek, New 
York . . . Holiday Stone and Brick, 
Inc., to Gregory & House & Jan- 
sen, Cleveland . . . Unexcelled Chem- 
ical Corp., to Fletcher Richards, 
Calkins & Holden . . . Five new 
accounts to Campbell-Mithun: Our 
Own Hardware Co., Krambo Food 
Stores, St. Paul Fire & Marine Insur- 
ance Co., Scudder Food Products, 
and D. W. Onan & Sons. 

Agency date: Eastern conference 

of the 4 A's will be in New York 
4-5 November. 

The schedule: meetings on re- 
search and marketing on 4 Novem- 
ber; media buying on 5 November. 

Chairmen for some of the meet- 
ings: Creative — Curtis Berrien, Es- 
ty v.p. and copy chief, and Ray- 
mond Lind, B&B v.p. in charge of 
tv commercial production. Media 
buying — Richard Jones, v.p. at 
JWT.^ 



On the move: Ketchum, Mae; 
Leod & Grove, to occupy the tor 
three floors of the new Gateway Num. 
ber Four building, Pittsburgh, by the 
fall of 1960. 

Anniversaries: D. P. Brother, a 

quarter-century old last week . . , 
Sam Riklin, account executive with 
Pitluk Advertising, San Antonio, pre- 
sented with a gold watch for his 10th 
year with the agency. 

New officers of the Chicago Agen- 
cy Media Group: 

President, Reginald Dellow, v.p. 
and media director at Grant; v.p., 
Richard Rogers, media director, 
John W. Shaw; secretary, Dolores 
Hagedorn, media buyer, Keyes,| 
Madded & Jones; and treasurer, 
Harry Pick, of Edward H. Weiss 
& Co. 

On the personnel front: Edmund 
Rogers Jr., manager of N. W. Ayer'sji 
Hollywood office, named v.p. . . , 
Allen Hodshire, to v.p. of Maxon' 
. . .Samuel Allen, to media director 
for the Chicago office of Fuller & 
Smith & Ross . . . R. J. Koeper, to 




1400 Oklahoma youngsters, from 
more than 85 cities and towns 
throughout the KWTV Com- 
munity, packed two crack Santa Fe 
special trains ... at student fares 
... for a two day, 1200 mile trip 
to the Gulf Coast area. 

The youngsters were accompanied 
by KWTV personalities, whose 
shows promoted the tour. 

A KWTV action-promotion in 
its 54-County Community! 



Edward Pelry & Co.. Inc. 



Represented by \ 

The Original Station Representative 



A Student 

Educational 

Tour f^or the 

54-County 

Community by 

KWTV 

OKLAHOIVIA OITY 



$Alf$fiom^fit Offf^^omf 



56 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




There's a 15% in your future 



We notice that a famous San Francisco 
retailer of objets d'art has discovered a 
new advertising medium: Chinese for- 
tune cookies. 

This suggests some interesting addi- 
tional possibilities — the inside of men's 
hat bands, tongues of shoes, ceilings of 
hotel rooms, and the little red strips 
you peel off of cigarette packs. Motor- 
men on San Francisco cable cars might 
be taught to sound their warning bells 
in Morse code, spelling out commer- 
cials. Traffic lights could be replaced 
by stop-and-go signs manned by police- 
men in Keystone Cop hats upon which 
tasteful exhortations could be engraved. 
Bay boat captains could send commer- 
cial smoke signals without blowing 
their stacks. The under side of the 
Golden Gate Bridge could be made 
into a vast 24-sheet visible to sea- 
going liners. 



There are some difficulties in the wav, 
some rough spots that need honing, 
but you get the idea. These suggestions 
are made, like they say, in the public 
interest. We figure there's room for 
everyone. 

(Meanwhile, we're not banking the 
fires under our transmitters. We'll 
keep right on covering well over half 
of the tv families in Iowa — and domi- 
nating three of Iowa's six largest 
cities.) 

WMT TV 

Cedar Rapids -Waterloo 
CBS Television for Eastern Iowa 

Mail Address: Cedar Rapids 

National Reps: The Katz Agency 

Affiliated with WMT Radio and KWMT, 

Fort Dodge 



M 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



57 



LONG ISLAND IS A MAJOR MARKET! 




THE VOICE OFLONGISLAND 



THE GREATER 
LONG ISLAND MARKET 

(Nassau-Suffolk) 

-LOCKS UP- 
MORE HARDWARE 
& BUILDING SALES 
THAN IS NAILED DOWN IN 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

ST. PAUL, SAN ANTONIO, 

AND ST. LOUIS 

PUT TOGETHER! 

LUMBER-BLDG.-HDWARE. 
STORE SALES 

$205,607,000 



(Sales Mgt.) 



WHLI 



Dominates the Major Long Island Market 
Delivers MORE Audience than any other 
Network or Independent Station! 



(Pulse) 



M 0,000 WATTS 



WHLII 

HEMPSTEAD 
lONC ISIANO. N. Y. 



AM 1100 



IfiTJi U/W 



Represented by Gill-Perna 



account supervisor at EWR&R . . . 
James Adams, to partner and me- 
dia director of Showacre, Coons, 
Shotwell, Adams, Spokane . . . Lee 
Teeman, to v. p. in charge of radio- 
tv graphics at Southward & Bentley, 
Chicago . . . Charles Hamilton, to 
radio/tv director at Bevel Associates, 
Dallas. 



FILM 



Expansion moves in the areas 
of programing, production and 
sales characterized the activities 
of all three network syndication 
arms last week. 

Here's what happened: 

• At CBS Films, Robert F. 
Lewine and Sam Cook Digges flew 
to Hollywood to open new West 
Coast production offices. 

• Also on the West Coast, CNP ap- 
pointed Frank O'Conner to coordi- 
nate new program development, Tom 
McKnight as executive producer, 
and Marhall Wortnian as business 
affairs director. 

• ABC Films named Don Joannes 
as Los Angeles regional sales man- 
ager and appointed the following sales 
executives: Jack Van Nostrand in 
the west; Jeff Davis, Olga Gomez 
and Barry Winton, all in the east- 
ern division; Mike Gould as Chicago 
regional sales manager, and Winston 
Colby and Robert L. Glazer to the 
central division staff. 

Programs: Trans-Lux TV reports 
completion of production of the 52nd 
Felix the Cat episode . . . Arrow 
Productions of ITC will handle 35 
feature films owned by Metropolis 
Productions. 

Sales: Bernard L. Schubert reports 
sale of Tv Reader's Digest, Cross- 
roads and Topper in Peru. Panama 
and El Salvador. 

Trade note : Tele-Features. Inc. have 
retained Kenneth Rader Company, 
N. Y. to handle their advertising. 

Ratings: Among 66 syndicated and 
national spot shows which had top 
ten ranking in an Arbitron survey 
(see FILM-SCOPE, p. 78) were the 
following shows, listed in one market 
only: Bugs Bunny, Dial 999, Tracer, 
City Detective, Men of Annapolis, Mr. 



District Attorney, Official Detective,] 
Panic, Policewoman, Secret Journal, 
Burns & Allen, Mr. Adams & Eve, I 
Search for Adventure, Citizen Soldier, 
Impact, Man Without a Gun, African 
Patrol, If You Had a Million, Sgl. 
Preston, Navy Log, Treasure, Danger 
is My Business, Gray Ghost, Man Be- 
hind the Badge, Racket Squad and 
Three Stooges. 

Strictly personnel: Crosby/Brown 
Productions has appointed Karl von 
Schallern as midwest sales manager 
and Joe Porter as southeast sales 
representative. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Information on radio and tv set 
ownership will be included in the 
1960 Census of Housing, it was 

reported at a meeting, last week, of 
the market research discussion group 
of the New York chapter of AMA. 

4. Ross Eckler, deputy director 
of the Census Bureau, told the meet- 
ing that data on the number of hous- 
ing units with more than one set will 
be included. 

In reporting on the upcoming pop- 



statement REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912, AS AMENDED BY THE 
ACTS OF MARCH 3, 1933. AND JULY 2, 1946 
(Title 39, United States Code, Section 233) 
SHOWING THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, 
AND CIRCU1.ATI0N OF 

SPONSOR, published weekly at Baltimore, Mary- 
land for October 1, 1959. 

1. The names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor and business managers 
are: 

Publisher and Editor: Norman R. Glenn, Mama- 

roneck. New York. 

Vice-Pres. and Asst. Publisher: Bernard Piatt, 

Rye, New York. 

Executive Editor: John E. McMillin, New York, 

N. Y. 

2. The owner is: SPONSOR Publications Inc., 
New York, New York. 

Stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more 
of total amount of stock: 

Norman R. Glenn, Mamaroneck. N. Y. ; Elaine C. 
Glenn. Mamaroneck. N. Y. ; Ben Strouse. Balti- 
more, Md. : Ruth K. Strouse. Baltimore, Md. ; 
William O'Neil, Cleveland, Ohio; Henry J. Kauf- 
man. \\ ashington, D. C. ; J. Bloom. New York, 
N. Y. ; Pauline H. Poppele. New York. N. Y. ; 
Edwin D. Cooper, North Hollj'wood, Calif. ; Judge 
M. S. Kronheim, Washington, D. C. : Norman Reed. 
Washington. D. C. ; Adele Lebowitz. McUean. Va. : 
J. P. Williams, Dayton, Ohio: Jerome Saks, Wash- 
ington, D. O. ; Catherine B. Koete, Hawthorne. 
N. Y. : William B. Wolf, Washington. D. C; 
Bernard Piatt, Rye, N. Y. 

3. Tlie knoBi-n bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders owning or holding 1 percent 
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgagee, or 
other securities are: NONE. 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include. In cases where 
the stockholder or security holder appears upon 
the books of the company as trustee or in any 
other fiduciary relation, the name of the person 
or corporation for whom such trustee Is acting: 
also the statements in the two paragraphs show 
the affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which stock- 
holders and security holders who do not appear 
upon the books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a capacity other than tliat 
of a bona fide owner. 

5. The average number of copies of each issue 
of this publication sold or distributed, through the 
mails or otherwise, to paid subscribers during the 
12 months preceding the date shown above was: 
11,501. (This information is required from daily 
weekly, semiweekly, and triweekly newspapers 
only.) 

Bernard Piatt 
Vice President. 
Assistant Publisher 

Sworn to and subscribed before »ie this eth day 

of October, 19.'J9. 

SEAL: Laura Oken 

(My commission expires March 30, 1960.) 



58 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




m 



.: ;^£igkvt^M>«:^;^i)Si^a»L.. . 



Finest way to speed to Europe and beyond . . . that's KLM! Fast flights whisk 
/ou non-stop from New York and Montreal, one-stop from Houston. Friendly 
flight attendants treat you to world-famous Royal Dutch service — the most 
thoughtful, attentive service you'll find anywhere! Contact your travel agent 
Dr KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, 609 Fifth Avenue or 120 Broadway, N. Y., N. Y. 



i 



W0S// 



. . you're in Europe 
before you know it! 



wr 



you're treated royally 
on Royal Dutch Airlines 



SO 



KLM to Europe 
. . . and beyond! 




THE WORLD S FIRST AIRLINE 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



This four-leaf clover 

Is worth looking over! 




Missouri's M TV Market 

151,400 TV HOMES* 

Lucky KODE-TV, Joplin, Mo., is 28% taller, 29% 
more powerful than the nearest competition. 
And KODE-TV covers: • a 4 state area • 151,400 
TV Homes • 669,800 people with $776,919,000 
buying power. 

KODE-TV CHANNEL 12 



JOPLIN, MISSOURI 



CBS-ABC 



Rep. by Avery-Knodel • A member of the Friendly Group 
FK6 *TV Mag., June '59 



Industrial Crescent 




A Vast 
Urban Complex 

WORK, EARN 
and SPEND. 

and it's dominated by 

uifmy-tv 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 




Boilc SInct 1«49 

Represented by 
Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 

New York • Chicago • San Froncisco • Atlanta • Boston 



ulation and housing census next 
year, Eckler promised more speedy 
delivery of material because of elec- 
tronic data processing, letting re- 
spondents fill out their own question- 
naires and the greater use of sam- 
pling. 

This week's advice, from RAB's 
Kevin Sweeney, to the Automatic 
Car Washing Association's meet- 
ing: 

1 ) "Concentrate on your prospects. 
Men wash their cars, and are easiest 
to reach via radio, particularly on 
Saturday and Sunday." 

2) "Look to radio stations for help 
in setting up your advertising sched- 
ules. They have data — which no oth- 
er medium that you can afford has — 
that will tell you the exact time and 
days of the week to reach all different 
types of prospects." 

Research note: A new study by 
KREM, Spokane, shows radio to be 
the prime source of immediate 
news. 

The study showed that in the event 
of an unusual disturbance, 44% of 
the people would listen to radio to 
find out what was happening, com- 
pared with 1.2% for tv and 4.6% for 
newspapers. 

Most listeners preferred news every 
hour, the study revealed. However, 
these are the fixed times when news 
is prefererd: 7 a.m., 7:45 a.m., 8 
a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. 

Ideas at work: 

• Write-in contest: KHAT, 

Phoenix, and advertiser Monti's Res- 
taurant co-sponsored a contest to see 
how many times the phrase 'Monti's 
steaks are best' could be written on a 
postcard. The winning number: 
7,741, taking a total of 30 hours, six 
pencils and three magnifying lenses 
to fill the card. Prize: round trip 
holiday for two in Las Vegas. 

• Promoting "juvenile decen- 
cy": KICN, Denver, kicked off its 
"High School Hall of Fame" last 
week. Station salutes outstanding stu- 
dents each day, from the several high 
schoolers nominated by listeners. 

• No rock n' roll: With the 
theme of "Melodic Living," WFAA, 
Dallas, is redesigning its programing, 
featuring melodies of music not now 
being generally heard on the air- 
waves. Another feature of the 'new' 



sound is "custom placing of clients 
commercials" which will be planned 
throughout the schedule and insertedl 
at specific times. 

Station acquisition: Taft Broad- 
casting Co., purchasing the remain- 
ing 707^ of WBIR, Knoxville stock 
for $203,536. 

New call letters: WOV, Bartell's lat- 
est acquisition in New York, changed 
to WADO. 

Business notes: Diamond Crystal 
Salt, for a 13-week saturation cam- 
paign on WRCA, New York . . . 
Adler-Built Construction Co., picking 
up the tab for two sport shows on 
WCKR, Miami . . . Acme Markets, 
sponsoring Kitchen Kapers, a house- 
wife-appeal show on WNTA, New- 1 
ark, N. J. . . . Pastene Wine & 
Spirits Co. (Doremus & Co.), for 
concerts on WBCN, Boston and I 
WXCN, Providence— both fm. 

Thisa 'n' data: KOA-AM-TV, Den- j 

ver, opened its new building at 1044 
Lincoln Street last week with a spe- 
cial dedication broadcast . . . WSM, 
Nashville, is expecting more than 




57.8% 

BIGGEST SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

IN AMERICA IN MARKETS 

OF 3 OR MORE STATIONS* 

FLASH! July- August Nielson 
gives KROD-TV leadership 
in total homes 96% of the 
time. ^^ 



KROD-mr 

EL PASO. TEXAS 



Dorronce D. Roderick, Pres. 

Vol Lawrence, V.-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BRANHAM COMPANY 




•ARB, July 1959 



60 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



RATES 



TH* 



AMONG THE TOP 
ONE HUNDRED TV MARKETS 

* SOURCE: TELEVISION MAGAZINE 



REX, 

fhe friendly 
Lion says,. 




"YOU GET THE LION'S 

SHARE OF RICH 

AGRICULTURAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL MID*AMERICA" 



Shoot Dead Center 
for SALES POWER! 




YES, STRAIGHT SHOOTIN' 

RIGHT INTO 365,000 

HOMES IN THE HEART 

OF MID-AMERICA'S 

AGRICULTURAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL MARKETS 



REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION INC. 
J. M. BAISCH GEN. MGR. 




2,000 d.j."s at the eisihth annual Na- 
tional Country Music <l.j. festival 
13-14 November . . . Stars on 
WCBS, New York are participating 
in the CARE drive by going through 
the city with a sound truck to solicit 
funds for the cause . . . Red Barber, 
veteran sportscaster, will leave 2.5 
October on a three week tour of U. S. 
military installations in Spain, Italy 
and North America under the spon- 
sorshij) of USO shows . . . Kudo: The 
Southern California Broadcast- 
ers Association honored by the 
Community Coordinating Councils 
for "meritorious service." 

Station staffers: Del Murry, to 

general sales manager of KYA, San 
Francisco . . . Stuart Barondess, to 
sales manager, WRAP, Norfolk . . . 
Marvin Rosenblatt, to station man- 
ager, 'WAVZ, New Haven . . . Joan 
Rutman, former media manager of 
Grey, to assistant director of national 
sales, WADO, New York . . . Charles 
Caldwell, to assistant station man- 
ager of WSIX, Nashville. 

Retiring: Herbert Irving, after 35 
years as engineer for KDKA, Pitts- 
burgh. 



TV STATIONS 



These expressions of opinion 
came from TvB spokesmen this 
past week. 

1) : 1959 will be the year that 
tv replaces newspapers as the 
leading medium of gasoline ad- 
vertisers. 

2) : Today's best informed adver- 
tisers are tv's greatest investors. 

The first projection was made by 
TvB president Norman Cash at the 
American Petroleum Institute meet- 
ing in Colorado Springs. He noted 
advertising trends in the first half of 
.59 show newspapers losing gasoline 
ads, with some $28.6 million antici- 
pated for the year. Tv meanwhile, is 
up about lO^f and will reach some 
$30.3 million in 1959 from this 
industry. 

The other opinion, expressed by 
v.p. and general manager George 
Huntington at AFA's Third District 
meeting in Greenville was the conclu- 
sion drawn from an analysis of the 
top 100 advertisers in all media. 



Right on top 
in FRESNO 




i 1 I 



availabilities on KJEO 

Source: Current Nielsen 

KJEO — Channel 47, No. 1 
for the money, No. 1 for the 
Central California audience. 




J 




channel 



© 



FRESNO 



J. E. O'Neill 
Joe Drilling ■ 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



• President 
Vice President 
and General Manaper 
W.O. Edhoini — Commercial Manager 
See your H-R representative n'n'^^^ 



61 



Ideas at work: 

• The tortoise and the hare — 
minus the hare: Grandpa, a per- 
sonality on WTTG-TV, Washing- 
ton, D. C. recently featured a "Turtle 
Race" on his program. The idea: 
viewers submitted miniature turtles 
which were numbered, placed in the 
center of a large circle, and at the 
encouragement of their owners raced 
toward the outer edge. Agency ex- 
ecutives in the area were invited to 
submit their predictions as to the 
order of finish. Winner: Harry Lon- 
don, of Henrv K. Kaufman Advertis- 



ing. His Prize: A case of turtle soup. 
• To the rescue: When Carol 
Chaplin, 20 year old San Diego Jun- 
ior College student was set for her 
2-mile ocean swim from the Mexican 
Coronados Islands to the California 
mainland at San Diego she was, at 
the last minute prevented because she 
couldn't locate a boat as the official 
vessel for the swim. KFSD-TV, San 
Diego, chartered a sportsfishing vessel 
for her and her party, got exclusive 
coverage of the swim via hourly phone 
reports which the station aired plus 
film of the entire successful swim. 



Beam your sales message to 



DULUTH- 
SUPERIOR 



the 




URGEST 
MARKET 



in both Minnesota and 
Wisconsin 

Zooming sales have made the* 
Ports metropolitan area the 
largest market in size only to 
Twin Cities in Minnesota and 
waultee in Wisconsin. 

In WDSM-TV's coverage area 
800,000 people, spending over I 
lion dollars* annually. 

You can best sell, best adver- 
tise to this growing industrial, 
shipping and vacation center 
by using WDSM-TV . . . 

*SRDS 5/10/59 




AT THE HEAD OF THE SEAWAY 

4 WDSM-TV 

^k ' DULUTH, MINN. NBC SUPERIOR, WISC. 



PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 
EXCLUSIVE NATL. REPS. 



WAYNE EVANS & ASSOC. 
REGIONAL REPS. 



which the station telecast that p.m. 

New corporation: Custom Identifi- 
cations, Inc., Long Island City, N. Y.. 
featuring humorously animated radio 
and tv station I.D.'s. 

Squaw Valley, California: Final 
regulations for radio and tv coverage 
of the Vm Olympic Winter 
Games, 18-28 February, 1960 have 
been approved. CBS TV has pur- 
chased exclusive telecasting rights to 
the Winter Games, but Olympic Rules 
still allow tv stations to use three 
minutes of footage daily. Additional- 
ly, a "newsreel pool" has been organ- 
ized to make available to tv stations 
footage of competitive events. 

Tliisa 'n' data: A new tv series. The \ 
Magic Eye, will bow in New York 17 
October, via WABC-TV. It's for 
young people, covering the area of ' 
general science, and will be sponsored 
by Young Readers of America, a ! 
branch of the Book-of-the-Month 
Club . . . New quarters: WSAV- 
AM-TV, Savannah, set to move into I 
its new million dollar Broadcasting 
Center . . . Business note: Cal Sales, 
Gardena, Cal. distributor of Triumph ; 
(out of Beckman, Koblitz. Los An- | 
geles) for the Baxter Ward News, at [ 
6 and 10 p.m. daily on KCOP, Los 
Angeles . . . Two quarterbacks of the 
Pittsburgh Steelers have signed with 
KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh for a video- 
taped series of pre-game football 
shows, for the Plymouth Dealers 
of Allegheny County. 

Anniversary notes: WPTA, Ft. 

Wayne, celebrated its second year 
with a dinner featuring guest speak- 
ers Julius Barnathan, ABC v.p. and 
James O'Grady, Young Tv v.p. . . . 
WWL-TV, New Orleans, also mark- 
ing its second anniversary with a 
multitude of plans for the future, in- 
cluding a new public affairs program 
which will feature a full-length opera 
and an art exhibit displaying entries 
from all over the country . . . WJXT, 
Jacksonville, begins its 11th year of 
telecasting this week. 

On the personnel front : Leonard 
Gumley, to director of operations in 
New York for WNTA-TV, Newark, 
N. J. . . . George Lindsay, to Cen- 
tral Division director in Chicago and 
Edward Armsby, director of sales 



62 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




WE'RE RA CING INTO UR 

7fi BIG SEASON! 

The U. S. Steel Hour tvill continue to bring you 

the finest in ''live'' TV entertainment every 
alternate Wednesday .. .and be sure to watch the 

Steel Hour Special, "Holiday on Wheels,'' 
tvith Sid Caesar, Audrey Meadows, Tony Randall 
and Gisele MacKenzie, Oct. 21 on CBS. 

U. S STEEL HO UR 



%\ 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



63 



promotion and presentations for TvB 
. . . Lester Dinoff, to director of 
publicity and public relations for 
WABC-TV, New York . . . John 
Leo, to v.p. in charge of sales of Gov- 
ernor Tv Attractions, Inc. 



NETWORKS 



Net tv sales: Ward Baking Co. 

(Grey) for alternate hours of ABC 
TV's Walt Disney Presents in the 
eastern region . , . Browning Fifth 
Avenue (Doner & Peck) beginning 
this week, for seven consecutive 
weeks on CBS TV's Meet The Press. 

Net radio sales : Niagara Therapy 

Co. (George Mallis) for participa- 



tions in the Garry Moore Show and 
Arthur Godfrey Time on CBS . . . 
Swanson Cookie Co. for its Archway 
Cookie line, on Don McNeill's Break- 
fast Club, ABC. 

Thisa 'n' data: Four new affiliates 
to ABC Radio: WICU, Erie, Pa.; 
KWEB, Rochester, Minn.; WPCF, 
Panama City, Fla.; and KCKC, San 
Bernardino, Cal. . . . Ed Sullivan 
named "Showman of the Century" by 
the Centennial Club of Baltimore. 

Network personnel : Henry Levin- 
son, to manager of sales develop- 
ment for ABC TV . . . Elliott Henry 

Jr., to director of information, ABC 
TV. Hollywood. 



cr?/ 




the formation of 

TRANSFILM-CARAVEL INCORPORATED 
combining the experience of two long 
established leaders in the film industry. 
We offer our clients the ultimate 
in creative staff and facilities for the 
production of non-theatrical films, 
television commercials and complete 
industrial programs. And, we shall continue 
to provide the talented services of our 
affiliate, Transfilm-Wylde Animation. 




REPRESENTATIVES 



New officers of the Radio and T\ 
Representatives Association ol 
Atlanta : 

President, Gregory Murphy, ol 
Katz; v.p.. Bill McRae, of H. H 
Clarke Brown, and secretary-treasur 
er, Frank Case of Headley-Reed. 

Adam Young now represents all 
Bartell Family Radio properties with 
the appointment of Bartell's latest ac- 
quisition, WADO (formerly WOVl 
New York. The John E. Pearson Co. 
was WOV's rep. 

Rep appointments: KPOP. Los 
Angeles, to PGW . . . KOSI. Denver, 
to Daren F. McGavren . . . KFMM. 
Tucson, to Good Music Broadcast- 
ers .. , KALI, San Gabriel, to Har- 
lan Oakes & Associates for the San 
Francisco market . . . KLMS, Lin- 
coln, Neb., to Philadelphia Spot 
Sales for the Philadelphia market. 
Burn-Smith Co. still station's nat'l rep 
. . . KYOS, Merced, Cal., to B-N-B, 
Inc., Time Sales as West Coast rep. 

New firm : James D. Bowden, for- 
merly v.p and manager of the Chi- 
cago office of John E. Pearson, opened 
his own company last week, bearing 
his name, at 1102 Northwestern Bank 
Building, Minneapolis. 

Rep appointments — personnel: 
Wilbur Fromm, to manager of new 
business and promotion, NBC Spot 
Sales . . . William More, to Pa- 
cific Coast manager of the radio divi- 
sion and David Meblin, Pacific 
Coast manager, tv division of Avery- 
Knodel . . . John McCrory, to ac- 
count executive in the Chicago office 
of CBS TV Spot Sales . . . John 
Walker, to the Chicago sales staff of 
Daren F. McGavren . . . K. Layton 
Miller, to the Dallas radio sales staff 
of Katz . . . Richard O'Donnell, to 
the New York tv sales staff of The 
Branham Co. 

Add to personnel: Three appoint- 
ments to the Blair Tv sales staff, Los 
Angeles: Byington Colvig, Joseph 
Rank and Richard Thacker . 
Edward Podolinsky, to manager of 
Weed Tv's Chicago office and Fred 
Edwards, to manage the firm's St. 
Louis office. 1 



64 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



For 

39 YEARS 

the 

Undisputed Leader 

in 

Oklahoma City 

Radio 



In 

Oklahoma City 
the station 
with by far 



ism 



Largest Audience 
is also 



lalAi 



■I* t' 



Prestige % 
Station | 

Call your 

Katz Man for the 

Audience & Coverage figures 



t'il-U.-' 



930 KG. 
Independent Modern Programming 

Owned and operated by 
The WKY Television System, Inc. 
WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 
WTVT, Tampa-St, Petersburg. Fla. 
Represented by the Katz Agency 




FOUR 

TIMES 
YOUR 
MONEY'S 
WORTH 



In Shreveport, one of America's fastest growing 
markets, you get a lot more for your money 
when you specify KTBS-TV, Channel 3. 
All Nielsen surveys show KTBS-TV the dom- 
inant station in a market over four times larger 
than Shreveport's metropolitan area in pop- 
ulation and income. Here is coverage that really 
counts - 1,318,600 people with $1,661,784,000 
to spend. 

Ask your Retry man for the story on the FULL 
Shreveport market. You'll find KTBS-TV not 
only gives you your money's worth, but more, 
lots more. 



NBC 




ABC 



E. Newton Wray, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



• SPRINGFIELD 

• DECATUR 

• CHAMPAIGN-URBANA 

^^WUe^ie Mid AmoMca 



fr 







METROPOLITAN MARKET 



NiSt! 



GRADE 



SPRINGFIELD 

WICS 

DECATUR 




lOVER 230.000 TV FAMILIES! 
AVAILABILITIES: YOUNG TV 



RATING REPS 

[Continued from page 42) 

or period, always late with avails, 
don't know their medium, are the 
world's best cry babies before, dur- 
ing and after the buy is made. Like 
the proverbial bad apple, they can be 
counted on the fingers of one hand! 
. . . Donald W. Osten, med. sup., 
Gardner Adv., St. Louis. 

• Easy rate card: One area where 
reps might help the industry is to as- 
sist stations in formulating a good, 
simple-to-buy-from rate card. Sta- 
tions have developed various buying 
plans to fit special situations, and this 
has resulted in terribly complex rate 
cards which are hard to interpret 
. . . Arnold E. Johnson, v.p., Needham, 
Louis & Brorby, Chicago. 

• Frequent changes: Philadelphia 
agencies suffer because of frequent 
changes in rep personnel. Most reps 
new to the city are not well indoctri- 
nated before making their first call. 
They don't know accounts and ac- 
counts' markets, and waste valuable 
time in getting information they 
should have before the interview with 
buyers . . . Evelyn Walmsley, assoc. 
med. dir., Lewis Silman, Philadel- 
phia. 

• One weak point: The only weak 
point is a tendency to sell only the 
immediate unit and not the strength 
of the medium (particularly true in 
radio). Few media people can com- 
pare with those in broadcast in being 
genuinely interested in, not only the 
initial sale, but in merchandising 
promotion and advertiser results, as 
well as keeping the harried buyer 
fully versed in individual station de- 
velopments and data. . . Donald E. 
Leonard, dir. of med., Fuller & Smith 
& Ross, New York. 

• Personality: Too many sales- 
men work on personality, getting on 
a friendly, non-business basis with 
buyers. This friendliness is apt to be 
good for the agency and client even 
though it often means that the sta- 
tion's planned pitches are diminished 
. . . Radio/tv v.p., New York. 

• Soul-searching: I wish this kind 
of soul-searching would stop. It's 
wasted effort, because if we buyers 
spent the time to really figure out 
what we wanted we'd either deliver 
a major speech or open up a new 
rep firm! . . . Med. dir., Boston. 



• More training: Reps should in- 
doctrinate and educate their sales- 
men more keenly before they put 
them on the street to sell something 
they know little or nothing about. 
There is too much "I don't know" or 
plain baloney answers to direct ques- 
tions regarding station policies . . » 
Buyer, Detroit. 

• Bad losers: I'd love to meet a 
rep who wasn't bewildered, amazed 
and aghast that you should build a 
schedule without including his sta- 
tion — and whose face didn't mirror 
his reaction that the agency's client 
would be out of business in six 
months, their families starving and 
the client lost to the agency forever- 
more. Just who do they think thev're 
kidding? . . . V.p., New York. 

• Social relations: There are few 
media people who can honestly say 
that pleasant social luncheons and 
token gratuities are not appreciated, 
if not necessary, from time to time 
in this "very personal" business . . . 
James Scanlon, buyer, William Esty, 
New York. 

• Market know-how: We expect 
reps to tailor avails for specific prod- 
ucts, according to audience composi- 
tion and program appeals. They 
should know their programing, their 
markets and our clients' products . . • 
Joan Mandel, Edward H. Weiss & 
Co,. Chicago. 

• Market data: Agencies need 
more market data on hours for shops, 
offices, factories and schools (open- 
ing and closing) ; the hours people 
spend getting to work and how they 
get there (car, bus, train, walking) ; 
what days/nights shopping is avail- 
able in department stores, supermar- 
kets, drugstores, etc.; the percentage 
breakdown of the market for white 
collar, factor, farm and other work- 
ers; per capita income as compared 
with the national level. We need to 
know less about the billions of dol- 
lars in retail sales, auto sales, etc. 
Who reads all those zeros? . . . Janet 
Murphy, broadcast supervisor, L. C. 
Gumbinner agency, New York. 

• Promotion: I have yet to meet 
a rep who is able and willing to assist 
me with promotion on stations which 
I have purchased from him. I wind 
up doing all the promotion and work 
directly with stations in securing 
their cooperation . . . Elizabeth Vos- 
berg, branch manager, Paul Locke 
Adv., Philadelphia. ^ 



66 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



laietlig 




"There are always two kinds of people in the world— 
those who pioneer and those who plod." 



Henry Ford (1863-1947). American automotive giant whose 
production genius mode a tremendous contribution to the industrial 
and economic growth of the nation. 



Trail-blazing is standard 
procedure at WWJ. Today, 
with 39 great broadcasting 
years behind it, Detroit's 
pioneer station is up front 
as usual, with the kind of 
music, news, sports, and 
special feature programming 
adult listeners like best. 
For your fall and winter 
planning, ask your PGW 
Colonel for the complete 
1959-60 WWJ story. It 
makes good listening— and 
good buying for lasting 
impressions. 




W VvU RADIO 

Detroit's Basic Radio Station 



NBC Affiliate 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. • OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE DETROIT NEWS 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



67 



MIAMI 




2cmtfc9^-Ai 



50,000 WATTS • CBS • WGBS IS -NmAf*44- RADIO 



a STORER Stat 



ion 



National Sales Offices: Call KATZ. 
625 Madison Ave., N. Y. 22 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 



M' 



PRESTO 

POLISHES 

BASE 

TO SAVE YOUR TAKES! 



The slightest flaw in a blank disc can spoil your finest "take." presto— inventor of 
instantaneous lacquered discs— makes sure you cut into quality. Here's how: Each 
base is carefully selected for flatness, then polished to a jeweler's finish before 
presto's special-formula lacquer coat flows on. Then, after curing, the disc is crit- 
ically examined to make certain it is dust-free. This insistence on perfection pays 
dividends. Proof? More recording companies have used more presto discs for more 
years than any other in the world. Hear the difference PRESTO-perfect makes... today! 

Cut the best with the best— use PRESTO STYLI too. 

REST0 

' BOGEN-PRESTO, Paramus, New Jersey. A Division of The Siegler Corporation 




CBS TV RATE CARD 

[Continued from page 35) 

ble schedule of spot prices, accordiii! 
to time and season. 

SPONSOR, in checking agencies whi 
had studied the new CBS tv rate card 
found the reactions generally favor 
able. A number of high rankin 
media men have felt, for some time 
that a general reconstruction of t 
rate structures is in order. 

They applaud the new CBS T\ 
move as a progressive step in the di 
rection of pricing tv according t' 
audiences reached. Only possibl 
complaint comes from agencies han 
dling such giant advertisers as Gen 
eral Foods who, with programs 
low discount prime time periods, wil 
have to pay more under the new dis 
count setup. (A preliminary estimate 
shows G.F. tagged for an additiona 
half million dollars annually.) 

Station representatives, approachet 
by SPONSOR, were cautious as to th« 
implications of the new network rate 
card for spot. Blair-TV, for example, 
feels that its "two-section rate card' 
with special pre-empt features (see 
SPONSOR, 6 June 1959) provides even 
greater flexibility and price advan- 
tages than the CBS approach. 

Stations, also, including several 
CBS affiliates with whom sponsor 
talked, hesitated to predict that the 
new network structure would result 
in marked changes in their own rates. 

Balanced off aaainst this hesitancy, 
however, is the fact that the CBS TV 
move does for the first time give tv 
(on a nation-wide scale) a unique 
flexibility and sensitivity of prices to 
audiences. No other medium has 
ever had such a rate story to tell its! 
advertisers, and the impact of this ad- 
vantage may be sufficient to build 
enthusiasm for the new philosophy. 

If this happens, SPONSOR predicts 
the next step in relating time costs 
to audiences will be somewhat more 
direct than the CBS moves. 

Rather than using a complex and 
rather confusing discount structure 
to establish a rate-audience level, it 
seems probable that stations and per- 
haps even networks will take the bull 
boldly by the horns and set up a 
schedule of rates, based from the be- 
ginning on viewing audiences. 

In any case, the entire industr)' will 
be watching the results of the CBS 
TV plan with hawk-eyed intensity 
during the next 12 months. ^ 



68 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



■ ^ 


B 


1 ■ ■ 


^B 


rv " 1 




V 

ft 




L' 






ass^T"-- ^^^^^ <^^^H 







The Selling Sound From Signal Hill 



Less than a year ago, WDAF announced 
The New Sound From Signal Hill — a 
solid new radio sound dedicated to 
better listening for our audience and 
better results for our sponsors. 

Local businessmen listened. They liked 
what they heard, and they bought into 
the New Sound. If you could see our 
sales book, we think you would be as 
impressed with the quality of these local 
advertisers as we are. They are the 



business leaders who must know Kansas 
City radio. This is where they live, and 
buy, and sell. 

Your Christal man can document this 
story with names and facts whenever 
you say the word. 



KANSAS CITY, MO 




^tliffit 



ITlNALHiL. 



A SUBSIDIARY OF NATIONAL THEATRES AND TELEVISION. INC. 




Il^ I think 

Newark's nice too, 
Smidley. 

But if you'd check tlie figures, Smid, you'd 
have this Cascade right uj) there on the list. 
The ("ascade four-station network actually 
nails down more E.B.I, than Newark or Indi- 
anapolis for that matter. More (hug sales than 
Kochester. More gas station sales than San 
Francisco. And if you need more . . . just 
rememher Cascade is the only television serv- 
ing the entire market. 





T ap— ■ . ■— 1 gMhk ■ ji"% Ik.! 



KIMA-TV 



YAKIMA, WASH 



PASCO. RICMtAND, 
KENNEWICK, WASH, 



KdAJ'TV MOSES lAKE, WASH 



KEPR-TV 

|/| ClAl.Ty lEWISTON, IDA 

For Facts and Figures: 



Notional Representatives: Pacific Northwest: 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY Company MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



SUPP-HOSE 

[Continued from page 47) 

the health side of the picture, curren 
spots (all 60-seconds) stress resulti 
of a test by the American Testing 
Laboratories. The spots open witli 
15 seconds of footage from Pari; 
fashion openings, stressing the poini 
that Supp-hose was worn in this chic 
atmosphere — not only for reasons ol 
glamour but to make life easier ! 
models on their feet all day. 

To get the 15 seconds of foota-r 
for the opening of the spots, Ellid 
linger & EUiot shot 1,900 feet in tvv. 
Paris fashion salons under super\ i- 
sion of agency personnel. Use of the 
footage in the spots combines the| 
aspect of glamour with a documen- 
tary flavor. 

"This is intentional," says Gold- 
schmidt, "to highlight the credibility 
and importance of the selling mes- 
sage. Small budget spot advertisers," 
he says, "can give as much excite 
ment and immediacy to their adver 
tising as bigger advertisers using spe 
cials for new car introductions and 
the like." 

Daniel & Charles makes footage 
from the Paris shooting available to 
retailers for their own advertising, 
suggests ways of using it in their own 
tv advertising, and even recommends 
the use of tv for the most effective 
local tie-in advertising, according to 
Goldschmidt. 

Supp-hose national magazine cov- 
erage is now limited to Life and 
Reader's Digest. Ads strongly resem- 
ble the fashion look of the tv com- 
mercials, but Goldschmidt cautions 
against any slavish carry-over of 
print to tv, or vice versa. "For a 
small-budget advertiser in particu- 
lar," he says, "it's important to re- 
member that demonstration is the 
No. 1 reason for using television. 

Goldschmidt uses 60-second radio 
spots (lifted virtually intact from the 
tv sound track) in markets where tv 
costs make a 21-spot saturation un- 
feasible. Buying pattern is similar to 
tv — morning, afternoon plus late eve- 
ning to catch working women. 

Every three months Supp-hose con- 
ducts consumer research to test con- 
sumer satisfaction and the success of 
its dual copy approach. Currently, 
it is surveying 2,400 purchasers of 
the product on what appeals sold 
them and the degree of satisfaction 
with the product claims. ^ 



70 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




-2C 

CONSOLE CONVENIENCE 

10-SECOND SPOTS - 

PRACTICAL AND PROFITABLE WITH AN AMPEX 

Spot commercials pay off. And even 10-second spots become practical with an Ampex Videotape* 
Television Recorder. Here's how these Ampex exclusive features make it possible... 

• TAPE TIMER Locates the 10-second spot on a reel... measures in hours, minutes and seconds 
. . . lets you set up 2, 3, 5 or 7 second cue -in for programming the 10-second spot. 

• 2-SECOND START Recorder is in full, stable speed fast ... permits even a 2-second cue ivith 
a safety margin. 

• WAIST HIGH TAPE DECK Permits loading of next comw,ercial in seconds... reels lie secure- 
ly without locks. Table top provides extra work space. 

• AUTOMATIC BRAKE RELEASE Makes reels free wheeling . . . tape pulls easily for fast 
threading — without tape stretch or crease. 

Write, wire or phone today for an Ampex representative — or ask for the new, fully illustrated 
brochure describing the new Ampex VR-IOOOB. Whatever you want to know about the advan- 
tages and profits in TV tape, get the facts from Ampex. AMPEX HAS THE EXPERIENCE. 



934 CHARTER ST. • REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 



TM AMPEX CORP. 



VIDEOTAPE 



Ampex 



CORPORATION 



professional 
products division 



Offices and Representatives in Principal Cities Throughout the World 



PONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 






WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand of 
all Indiana TV stations! 



•^ 



One hundred and eleven national 
and regional spot advertisers 
know that the Terre Haute 
market is not covered 
effectively by outside TV 



WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 • CBS— ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 

Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 




DOMINATES 
CENTRAL NEW YORK 




WSYR-TV AtONi OELiViRS 44,287 
MOM HOMIS THAN ITS COMPETITOII 

WSYRTV ANP ITS SATELUTS, 

WSYE-TV, DELIVER 73,089 MORE 

HOMES THAN ITS COMPETITOR 

*AII figures NCS No. 3 weekly circulation 



fSf^Mik^^ii] 



C>l '*< r-ll %i"t /'•• HARRINGTON. RICHTCR ll PARSONS 



SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued from page 51) 

tie of downtown versus suburbia that 
can have happy results from the entire 
area as this big midwest market flexes 
its muscles. While metropolitan St. 
Louis has approximately 1.14% of 
the nation's population, it possesses 
1.3 of the spendable income. In 
addition, the zone of effective in- 
fluence is a surrounding market of 
91 counties, containing more than 
three and a half million persons. 
St. Louis is a "two-state" city with 
such a perfect mixture of most ele- 
ments of America that it is an ideal 
test market. Timebuyers should be 
aware that St. Louis is a one-rate 
market. The major broadcasters have 
resisted regional or local rates. Mul- 
tiple prices for similar service are at 
a minimum in comparison with most 
top markets. In making an analysis 
of the St. Louis market, timebuyers 
would do well to remember that some 
of the most successful national users 
of broadcast media are represented by 
St. Louis agencies. The "buys" of 
the media people at D'Arcy & Gardner 
should provide a valuable basis for 
comparison. They live in the market 
and are aware of a station's day-to- 
day performance. Where once traffic 
flowed westward, St. Louis is now a 
magnet for business from a vast mid- 
west empire. Yes, the "Dowager 
Queen" has stepped up her pace. 
She's right in the swing of things — 
an increasingly rich target for modern 
"marketers." 

Robert 0. Reynolds, pres.. Golden 

West Broadcasters. Los Angeles (KMPC, 
L.A.: KFSO, San Fran.: KVl, Seattle) 

Anyone, particularly anyone east 
of the Rockies, knows that Los An- 
geles is a "peculiar" place. It's the 
land of the kidney-shaped swimming 
pool, the derby-shaped restaurant, 



74% of L.A.'s 
working popu- 
lation uses car 
to work 



the weiner-shaped hot dog stand. It's 
the native haunt of the technicolor 
sports coat and the mink-upholstered 
sports car. Here, everything is said 




to be "fabulous," "gigantic" and as 
insubstantial as a movie prop. 

The truth about Los Angeles is far 
less colorful than some of the items i 
we have touched on above, but it is ' 
of infinitely greater value to the man 
who is looking to this area as a mar- 
get for goods and services. The one ' 
superlative that fits Los Angeles al- 
most to perfection is "gigantic." It 
is a market of great distances, where 
the average worker drives some 40 
miles to work and back, a transporta- i 
tion feat that takes this average 
person a full hour and 36 minutes. 

No city in the world has been as 
extensively suburbanized as Los An- , 
geles. This headlong flight toward the I 
horizons is likely to continue for 
some time. Next year, as in yeais 
past, it is expected that more than 
220,000 people will enter the area in 
search of permanent homes. The 
continuing scramble for living places 
supports the greatest home-construc- 
tion boom in the nation. 

At this point I might be expected 
to announce that radio is the only 
way to reach the Los Angeles market. 
It is not. But it does have definite 
advantages over its competitors. It 
offers a high degree of coverage at 
low cost. One station can reach as 
much as 40% of the market's homes 
in a day, over 80% in a week. 

A Los Angeles radio station does 
not find its audience splintered by 
competition from suburban stations. 
The station that delivers the biggest 
audience in Los Angeles can also 
boast leadership in Burbank, Long 
Beach or far away Pomona. 

Unlike newspapers, radio is not in- 
hibited by the fact that 74% of Los 
Angeles' working population travels 
to and from work in automobiles. 
More than 80%. of these cars (43% 
of trucks) have working radio sets. 

The strongest daily can reach little 
more than one out of every five met- 
ropolitan homes. In fact, the typical 
metropolitan householder reads a 
small town or suburban paper rather 
than any one of the four dailies pub- 
lished in downtown Los Angeles. 

Let me end this by saying that the 
people who live in Los Angeles are 
not appreciably "different" from the 
people anywhere else. The adver- 
tiser will not find it difficult to speak 
their language. He must only be sure 
that he speaks through a medium that 
can contend with great distances and 
almost continuous movement. ^ 



72 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




^■H.|ijji|ii]iirBgEI5^M 



BUT... You Don't Have To, To Get RESULTS 
In Kalamazoo - Grand Rapids! 



NSI SURVEY— KALAMAZOO-GRAND RAPIDS AREA 

(July, 1959) 
STATION TOTALS FOR AVERAGE WEEK 





HOMES DELIVERED 


PERCENT OF TOTAL | 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


Mon. thru Fri. 

9 a.m.-Noon 
Noon-3 p.m. 
3 p.m.-6 p.m. 
Sun. thru Sat. 
6 p.m.-9 p.m. 
9 p.m. -Midnight 


58,900 
58,900 
53,000 

107,600 
118,200 


24,100 
36,100 
32,400 

63,100 
54,500 


70.97, 
62.07, 
62.07, 

63.07, 
68.07, 


29.1% 
38.0% 
38.0% 

37.0% 
32.07o 



A glance at the record tells you why WKZO-T\'^ spreads 
the good word for your product /a5/cr and farther than any 
other medium in the Kalamazoo-Grand Raj:)ids area. 

WKZO-T\' delivers 116% more homes (see NSI Survey 
at left) than Station "B," Sunday through Saturday 
(9 p.m. -midnight). The 9-County ARB Survey (April 
17-May 14, 1959) covering 300,000 TV homes gives 
WKZO-TV an overwhelming lead in popularity — No. 1 
spot in 74.6% of all quarter hours surveyed ! 

Remember — if you want all the rest of outstalc Michigan 
worth having, add WWTV, Cadillac, to your WKZO-TV 
schedule. 

^Oldest age contended by a U.S. citizen is 123 years, 42 days for Mrs. 
Belle H. Kytnes who died April 15, 1934. 



^ 



P^-'^^-M 



WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAAAAZOO-BATTIE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAAAAZOO 
WWTV — CADIILAC, MICHIGAN 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 
WMBDW — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



"WKZO-TV 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 * 1000' TOWER 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 

For Greater Western Michigan 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Represenfafives 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



MENNEN 

(Continued from page 45) 

One time-tested teclinique which 
proved successful in thsse promotions 
involved station contests with Men- 
nen products as prizes. Here, sales 
force co-ordination with the stations 
was essential in order to insure de- 
livery of the prizes I usually gift sets I 
on time and in the right quantities. 

This was only one reason that Men- 
nen regarded a thorough briefing of 
its sales force as a prime requisite to 
success of the campaign. The entire 
campaign was laid out at two sales 



meetings — one in Chicago, the other 
in New York. Initial response was 
overwhelmingly enthusiastic for an 
unplanned — but, in Thompson's view, 
a highly significant reason: the sales 
meetings were held after the spot 
schedules had been in effect for two 
weeks. "Salesmen were aware of 
them, had already been ge'.ting re- 
sponse from buyers," says Thomp- 
son. "We didn't have to convince 
them it would work." 

Four weeks after the 13 July kick- 
off, these reports began coming in: 

• OMAHA. Charles Swinehart. sun- 



Northrupf King & Co.^s Dollar 
Buys More on WKOW 




"Roy Gumtow, WKOW 
Farm Director, does a 
particularly strong job on 
his farm visits. Our sales- 
men and our dealers wel- 
come his interest, and we 
appreciate the splendid 
cooperation and strong 
support that he and 
WKOW are giving our 
sales program." 

K. H. Erickson, Director 
Marketing- Advertising 
Northrup, King & Co. 



"Thank you, Hale Byers and Bob Rizer of BBDO for select- 
ing WKOW, 'First in selling in Southern Wisconsin.' " 

Ben Hovel 
General Manager 
WKOW— WKOW-TV 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 



TV-Q 




RADIO- 10 KW- 1070 



dry and cosmetic buyer for the Oni; 
ha McKesson & Robbins branch tol 
SPONSOR that overall sales for Mei 
nen products were up 24-to-319f 
July 1959 over the same period la; 
year. 

• NEW ORLEANS. Claude Bourgeoi: 
sales manager of I. L. Lyons, large 
wholesale drug house in the area, n 
ported to SPONSOR that in July an 
August Skin Bracer movemen 
doubled. Spray Deodorant triplec 
Stick Deodorant more than triple 
over the figures of the previou 
months. Retail drug outlets reporte 
similar increases in movement 
Mennen products. 

• LOS ANGELES. Leading dru 
chain reported selling out Skin Brae 
er "faster than we can re-order 
There were similar reactions froii 
other big chains. 

• DETROIT. Large Detroit dru| 
chain reported Mennen sales up 19% 
A drug wholesaler reported a 20^ 
rise. 

• ST. LOUIS. One of the larges 
wholesale drug houses reported de 
odorant sales up 50'^r ; Foam Spray 
157( ; Quinsana, 25%. 

• DENVER. Supermarket sales o 
Mennen products up 12-15%, accord 
ing to Mennen sales representative. 

• INDIANAPOLIS. 15% increase was 
measured. 

• MIAMI. Leading drug chain re 
ported lO-to-15%1 increases. 

• BOSTON. 10-15% increases were 
reported by four leading drug whole 
sale houses. 

To establish the effect of the cam 
paign on brand preference, a Tren 
dex survey was ordered for two prod 
ucts in Boston. Three hundred twelve 
men were interviewed by telephone 
First interview was conducted 25-26 
July, second interview 29-30 August] 

To the question, "What brand ot 
after-shave lotion did you purchase 
last?" Mennen ranked second with a 
17.6% share. Second time around it 
moved into first place with 25.7% 
(to 20.6% for the next brand*. 

On the second question, "What 
brand of deordorant did you purchase 
last?" Mennen rose from 17.3% 
(first place) to 24 %o (still in first). 

Following the first seven weeks of 
the campaign, Mennen's contracts 
call for an alternate week schedule. 
Exposure will total 14 weeks out of 
the 20-week period from 13 July to 
28 November. ^ 



74 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 




ire as shootin', things have happened in Charlotte, 
ire you see one more phase of the formula that 
changing audience patterns in America's 25th largest 
levision homes market. The best of NBC, ABC- plus 
GM, Warner, Paramount, others! WSOCTV program strength 
unmatched in the Carolinas. Make a better buy. Buy 
SOC-TV one of the great area stations of the nation. 




CHARLOTTE 9-NBC and ABC. Represented by H-R 



WSOC and >A/SOC-TV are associated with WSB and >VSB-TV, Atlanta; >WHIO and >VHIO-TV, Dayton 

'ONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 19.S9 75 




SAFE 



WAY 




"The 'Sound of Quality' on WRC Radio 
has been a most successful medium 
} of advertising for Safeway's quality products 
in the Washington market for 
over a decade." (signed) Burton R. Warner, 
Advertising Manager, Safeway Stores Inc. 

Washington, D.C. 
Further proof that there are greater sales in 
store in the nation's capital for advertisers who • 
rely on the "Sound of Quality" onTTTTJ /^ 
NBC Owned-980 in Washington, D. C.}/ V Xv W 
Sold by NBC Spot Sales 



What's happening in U. S. Governmeni 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



17 OCTOBER 1959 Timing is an important element of showmanship: The Harris House Com- 

cepyrioht 1959 mercc Legislative Oversight subcommittee quiz show hearings had it. 

SPONSOR In the absence of other important Washington activity, the big black headlines were gath- 

puBLicATioNs INC. ercd by Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the group, and the willing subcommittee 

members. 

What would come out of the hearings, other than the headlines, was highly debatable. 
Federal Trade and Federal Communications Commissions were urged to do something about !j 

fixed quizzers. "There oughta be a law" was kicked around among the lawmakers. 

Chances of any law's being enacted seemed slim on two counts. The first: 
nothing even slightly like a new law has developed from this group in the past. Not even 
their much-publicized code of ethics to cure whatever might be wrong with FCC practices. 
Second: it would be difficult, and perhaps impossible, to draft legislation to cure quiz show 
malpractices without running fearful risks of crossing the line over to active censorship. 

The same Rogers was much disturbed by lack of effort on the part of FCC and FTC 
to stop quiz show fixing, but in this he was joined bv most other members. FCC chairman 
John Doerfer said commission authority \i very unclear in this direction, and the 

FCC control over quizzers might lead to control over wrestling shows, and then into out- 
right censorship. 

FTC chairman Earl Kintner said his agency has authority only over misleading ad 
claims, not over misleading entertainment. 

Strangely, in view of the fact that all evidence appeared to exonerate the networks com- 
pletely, it appeared that the webs might be the chief victims of the exposures. There was 
solid evidence that the disclosures were strengthening those who favor more rigid 
control of networks. 

The FCC moved suddenly and unexpectedly to bar network spot representation 
of non-owned stations: A deadline date of 31 December 1961 was set for those 
stations now represented by CBS and NBC to select independent reps. ABC doesn't 
represent any stations. 

(CBS announced it would oppose the ruling.) 

This was the second specific upshot of the FCC's network studies and the resulting Bar- 
row Report. The first was the voluntary decision of NBC and CBS to give up "must buy," 
a practice the Report also hit and a practice in which ABC again did not engage. 

The FCC is currently engaged in moving in a third direction, with all of the arguments 
and counter-arguments in on a half-hour cut in web option time, strengthening affiliates' power 
to refuse network programing, and putting "straddle" programs entirely within option time. 

Tlie Commission found the potential for restraint of competition in the spot repre- 
sentation of non-owned stations by networks, although conceding that the webs hadn't 
done anything ofif -color to date. 

Philco had its "day in court" at oral arguments before the FCC on its contention 
that NBC's WRCV-radio-tv, Philadelphia, licenses should not have been renewed. 

It raised an interesting point: In view of the RCA-NBC-Justice consent decree, 
renewal would mean granting of the licenses merely to permit sale of the stations. 

SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 77 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



17 OCTOBER 1959 Each of the three network syndication arms has arrived in its own way at a cru- 

Copyright 1959 ^.j^j njomem j^ jjg development and growth as plans for 1960 are transformed into 

actuality. 

It will come as no surprise that the three biggest areas to get revamping or a green light 
for expansion are these: 1) program development, 2) production, and 3) sales. 

The past season has been one of contrasts for the network film arms, with CBS 
Films registering one of its less opulent seasons and CNP (NBC Films) scoring one of its best. 
At the same time, ABC Films has come under a brand new administration. 

Here's how each of the network arms are reacting to their present situation : 

• CBS Films, with Robert F. Lewine settling in as programs v.p., is aiming for eight 
new shows in 1960. It's an open secret CBS Films has encountered many disappointments 
and complications this past year, not the least of which was an epidemic of unsold pilots, both 
filmed and taped. 

• CNP, with the success of its first two network sales, will raise its sights to focus on six 
new shows for 1960. Additionally, its program department has been buttressed with Frank 
O'Connor, coordinator of new program development, and executive producer Tom McKnight. 

• ABC Fihns, under the leadership of Henry Plitt, has "a great abundance" of new shows 
ready for release, and has added seven new men to its sales staff in anticipation of its forth- 
coming sales drive. 

(For more details, see FILM WRAP-UP, page 58.) 



Local ratings variations give as many as 66 different syndicated shows the op- 
portunity to claim some kind of top ten status in an Arbitron survey of ten major 
cities from April-to*August this year. j 

The ARB rankings were made in Atlanta, Boston, Columbus, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, ' 
New Orleans, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Washington. 

Shows were included in the listing if they ranked anywhere in the top ten in at least one 
ratings report of the five months covered. 

Here's a grouping of shows according to how many ten markets in which they attained ' 
favored top ten ranking: 

NO. OF MARKETS SHOWS 

10 Sea Hunt, Highway Patrol j 

9 U. S. Marshall 

7 Rescue 8, MacKenzie's Raiders 

6 Mike Hammer, Flight 

5 U. S. Border Patrol, State Trooper, Bold Venture, Popeye, Whirly- 

birds, Silent Service, Superman, San Francisco Beat. 
4 Special Agent 7, Divorce Court, Sheriff of Cochise. 

3 Decoy, Jeff's Collie, Honeymooners, 26 Men, Walter Winchell File, 

Jim Bowie, Medic, Roy Rogers. 
2 New York Confidential, This is Alice, Amos & Andy, Cannonball, 

Casey Jones, Our Miss Brooks, How to Marry a Millionaire, Union 
Pacific, Colonel Flack, Soldiers of Fortune, Target. 
(For details on national spot shows and on shows listed in only one market, see FILM 
WRAP-UP, page 58.) 



78 



SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Ziv has introduced one of the first syndication programing patterns of signifi- 
cance in several seasons. 

The new pattern : Producing a full year's new product for a series which has had 
a run on network. 

This is happening to Tombstone Territory, which had had a successful career on ABC 
TV, and is now going syndication. 

Formerly, a syndicated show started either as an unknown or as reruns from the net- 
works, but Tombstone Territory, already proven on the network, will be first run rather 
than rerun in syndication. 

The show has already four regional deals, accounting for 38 markets. 

Don't assume that promotional spending can work miracles with syndicated 
shows in every case. 

One film distributor is still stinging from an experience it had with a show sponsored 
by an oil company in a major midwest city. 

Here's what happened: The syndicator spent $25,000 out of its own pocket to 
promote a new series, but despite this liberal hypo, ratings were ineffectual and the sponsor 
cancelled after six weeks. 

The advent of video-tape appears to have had no impact on the fortunes of 
color in local broadcasting. 

Just five stations and two networks have installed color-tape equipment: WNBQ-TV, Chi- 
cago; WHO-TV, Des Moines; WLW-TV, Cincinnati; WET Charlotte; and WRCV-TV, Phila- 
delphia are the only stations with color tv tape equipment, and ABC is the only network 
without it. 



COMMERCIALS 

Keep your eye on network activities expanding into the areas of industrial and 
business films production. 

As at various times in the past, the networks are now attempting again to make use of 
idle facilities and studios. 

Video-tape may make a crucial difference, since it's claimed that film copies of high 
quality can be made that are better than kinescopes on which tv studio work was previously 
recorded. 

Keep in mind also there's been a recent change of attitude by network ofiBcials: Now many 
admit they're in commercials and other production for profit as contrasted to the 
earlier motive of service to existing air clients. - 

Since any revenue the networks can get out of industrials business falls into the cate- 
gory of found money, it's feared by independent film producers that network prices on 
industrials will have a competetive edge. 

Here's the big question: If the networks go into industrials to amortize other investments, 
how will the independent producers, who depend on industrials and commercials for their 
subsistence, react? 

Two New York commercials producers that are subsidiaries of Hollywood com- 
panies made personnel additions last week. 

MGM-TV appointed Alex Leftwich to direct all east coast commercial and industrial 
production, and Elliot-Unger-Elliot (Columbia Pictures) put on Burton A. Neuburger as 

midwest sales representative. 

• 17 OCTOBER 1959 79 



11! 




17 OCTOBER 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for adme 



SPONSOR HEARS | 



NBC will probably solve its Philadelphia dilemma — the forced divestiture of itj 
Philadelphia stations — by a swap-plus-money deal involving a major midwest market 

The network has until 1961 to haul stakes out of Philadelphia. 



With programing included, P&G's expenditures in tv for 1959 could come verj 
close to the $100-million-mark. 

An off-hand estimate would put Lever's tv stakes in the neighborhood of $60 million an( 
Colgate somewhere around $50 million. 



Some reps are basing their agency pitches on what they term the realistics ol 
modem radio buying: the use of more than one station in a market. 

Their approach : Ours is admittedly far from being the No. 1 station in the market but i 
does deliver a type of audience which doesn't listen to the No. 1 station. Hence if you com 
bine our audience with the No. 1 station's audience you achieve the ideal coveragt 
for that market. 



NBC's Joe Culligan made it explicit that he's not interested in joining up with 
Henry J. Kaiser, who has plans of building a tv empire in South America. j 

Kaiser, incidentally, is the only American auto manufacturer who has the right in Argen^i 
tine to turn out his product from scratch. He's a station operator in Hawaii and owns a piece 
of the syndication rights to Maverick. 



A top CBS echeloner on tuning in the Jack Paar show recently was surprised to 
hear the star welcoming a CBS affiliate to its lineup. 

The next day he inquired from his people how long's this been going on and the reply 
was, from away back. 

At last count there were eight CBS affiliates carrying the Paar show. 



Note the mounting expensiveness of the commercials as the Detroit Big Three 
unveil their new models, especially when there's color. 

Ford this season will likely break the all-time record in commercial spending. 

The cost for the sell on that initial show on the NBC Tuesday night series is reputed to have 
gone well over $100,000. 



Reports of who and what the Harris Committee probe of quiz programs is 
gunning for are numerous and conflicting along Madison Avenue. 

A name most prominent among the whos is Revlon, whose operation tripled its sales 
gross to the $100-million-mark during the course of its $64,000 series. 

The most cited what: The enactment of law declaring as an unfair trades practice an 
advertising hoax serving to create a sales stimulation edge over competitors. 



80 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



"Now that we're 
changing reps . , . 



Let's 



hear what 

Young 

has to*^ sa^^ 




As you prepare to 

choose new reps, 

what questions 

particularly concern 

you? Aren't these 

the ones? Are we 

important on their list? 

How creative are 

their men? How 

aggressive? How good 

is their research? What are they doing for other 

stations? How fast are they growing? 

Before making your final decision, you owe 

yourself Young TV's answers to these questions. 

YOUNG TELEVISION CORPORATION 

An Adam Young Company 

NEW YORK CHICAGO ST. LOUIS LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO DETROIT ATLANTA 

i East S4lh St. Prudential Plait 317 No. Eleventh SI. 6331 Hollywood Blvd. Puss BIdg. (Rm. 1707) 1940 Book Bidg. 1182 W. Peaehlree 

New York 71, N.Y. Chicago 1, III. St. Louis, Mo. Los Angeles 7B, Calif. San Francisco 4, Calif. Detroit 76, Mich. Atlanta. Ga. 

Plaza 1-4S4B Michigan 7-6190 MAin I-S070 Hollywood 7-778$ YUkon 6-6769 WOodward 3-6919 TRinity 3-7SS4 



iPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



81 








YOUR 



AM 









1 

.1 1 



I inform, interpret, analyze, advise, question, compliment and 
complam. I am the heartbeat of your industry. 

As my issues tick by, I record the pulsations of your industry — 
its strengths and weaknesses, its triumphs and failures, its hopes and 
regrets. 

I live to serve. I live to serve your industry that is also mine. 

My sense of service means many things. More than just words- 
in-print to keep you posted, my sense of service also means projecting 
the significant facets of our kaleidoscopic industry in sharpest focus 
for all to see. 

It means fighting for industry advances, sometimes in the face 
of bitter opposition. 

It means providing you with fact-and-figure tools to help you 
do your job better. 

It means painting a positive picture of our industry, a picture 
so plausible that even the most carping critic cannot deny its validity. 

It means adding moral stature to our industry whether the issue 
be Code compliance, rates, or ratings. It means a personal code of 
conduct that permits me, with clean hands, to urge highest standards 
on our industry. 

I am the heartbeat of our industry. As you can see, I am also 
its conscience. 

How well I do my job only you are qualified to judge. 

I am proud to be your trade paper. I promise to serve you in 
every way at my disposal. 

I am SPONSOR. 



Hoiv tcell SPONSOR does its job is partially- 
revealed by agency-advertiser surveys of 
reading preferences. We''ll be happy to send 
you summaries of the two latest. 



Don't bury your head 



NEGRO 
RADIO 



An Ostrich with a buried head misses 
many things that are most obvious. If you 
haven't discovered Rounsaville Radio 's six 
Negro Markets you are overlooking an 
824 million dollar consumer group. That's 
what Negroes in the Rounsaville Radio 
area have ready to spend AFTER taxes! 
80% of their money is spent on consumer 
items alone. Incomes are up 192% since 
World War II! To make sure you're get- 
ting your share of nearly one billion dol- 
lars, use Rounsaville Radio ! All six 
Rounsaville Radio stations are Number- 
One Rated by BOTH Pulse and Hooper. 
Call Rounsaville Radio in Atlanta, John 
E. Pearson, or Dora-Clayton in the South- 
east today! 




Personal Letter 

An Advertiser's dream is a 
captive audience pre-condi- 
tioned to buy his product. 
The nearest thing to this is 
Rounsaville Radio — 1 00' ', 
programmed to the Negro 
audience. Negro performers tell your sales 
story to their Negro listeners, and believe me, 
they buy! A proper part of your budget must 
go to Rounsaville Radio or YOU miss this market! 
We are one of the oldest and largest broad- 
casters in Negro Radio. 

HAROLD F. WALKER 

V.P. 4 Nat'l Sales Mgr. 



FIRST U. S. NEGRO-PROGRAMMED CHAIN 
FIRST IN RATING IN SIX BIG MARKETS 

WCIN 1,000 Watts (5,000 Watts soon)-Cin- 

clnnati's only all Negro-Programmed Station! 

WLOU 5,000 Watts — Louisville's only all 

Negro-Programmed Station! 

WMBM 5,000 Watts— Miami-Miami Beach's 

only full time Negro-Programmed Station! 

WVOL 5,000 Watts — Nashville's only all 

Negro-Programmed Station! 

WYLD 1,000 Watts— New Orleans' only full 

time Negro-Programmed Station! 

WTMP 5,000 Watts— Tampa-St. Petersburg's 

only all Negro-Programmed Station! 

BUY ONE OR ALL WITH GROUP DISCOUNTS! 



ROUNSAVILLE 

RADIO STATIONS 

PEACHTREE AT MATHIESON. ATLANTA 5. GEORGIA 

ROBERT W. ROUNSAVILLE HAROLD F. WALKER 

Owner-President V.P. i Nail Sales Mgr. 

JOHN E. PEARSON CO. DORA-CLAYTON 

Nat'l Rep. Southeastern Rep. 

84 






Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 








Sig Mickelson, v. p. of CBS and general' 
manager of CBS News since 1954, has been 
named president of the CBS News Division. 
His entire career has been devoted to 
journalism — first on newspapers and later! 
in broadcasting. Mickelson joined CBS ini 
1943 as news editor of WCCO, Minneapolis,' 
then owned by the network. In December, ^ 
1949, he was transferred to N. Y. as CBS I 
director of public affairs. In July, 1951, he was named director 
of news and public affairs for CBS TV and. in 1954, became v.p.i 

i 

Mort Werner has joined Young & Rubi- 
cam as v.p. and director of the radio/tv de- 
partment, succeeding Pete Levathes who 
resigned last month. A veteran of 27 years 
in broadcasting, Werner comes from the 
Kaiser Industries where, since 1957, he 
was a v.p. and director of program and 
advertising activities. He also participated 
in the development and direction of 

Kaiser's tv and radio stations in Honolulu. Prior to that, Werner was 
v.p. in charge of national programs at NBC TV under Pat Weaver. 

Tom W. Judge has been appointed direc- 
tor of CBS TV Production Sales. He joined ' 
the network in 1951 as an account executive 
in CBS TV Spot Sales, later advancing to | 
midwestern sales manager and then east- 
ern sales manager. Judge left CBS in 1956 
to become v.p. of sales for Closed Circuit j 
Television System. He later joined West- 
inghouse Broadcasting Co. as national tv 
sales manager, and, in 1958, returned to CBS as an account execu- I 
tive for WCBS-TV, New York. Judge was graduated from Indiana U. 

Robert F. Laws, v.p. of Eisaman-Johns 

Advertising, Los Angeles, has been named 

a principal of the company whose name 

has recently been changed to Eisaman, 

Johns & Laws. He joined the firm in May, 

1958 after operating his own agency in 

Los Angeles. Prior to that, he was western 

sales manager of radio and tv for ABC. 

Before moving to Los Angeles in 1949, 

Laws had been western advertising manager for the Philco Corp. in 

San Francisco, and sales promotion manager for KGO, San Francisco. 

SPONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 





' I '' 




PHILADELPHIA 

WELCOMES . . . 



FOR ITS 4th ANNUAL CONVENTION! NOV. 1-4 WARWICK HOTEL 



The Broadcasters' Promotion Association has planned 
an unusually fine get-together for 1959! Our conven- 
tion "call letters" are C-O-M-E! 

There'll be more sound and practical promotional 
ideas unveiled than you can shake a rate card at. We 
also want to hear what new marvels of merchandising 



you have in motion on behalf of your channel or 
frequency! If you're interested in the broadcast adver- 
tising, promotion or publicity field, the convention is a 
musf for you! This year, there's an extra feature to the 
affair: a few days of fabulous Indian Summer in 
Philadelphia! 



through Wednesday 

, kor 1 — 4 



W 



Telephoi 




BE SURE TO CLIP THIS COUPON 



Mr. William Plerson 
Broadcasters' Promotion Ass'n. 
190 North State Street 
Chicago 1, Illinois 

Dear Bill: 

Yes, incieed! I plan to attend the 4th Annual BPA Convention in Philadelphia. 

My check in the amount of $ is enclosed. I'll follow-through on my 

hotel reservation. 

NAME 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 



-STATE- 



BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION, INC. 



Sfale-Lake Building 
Chicago 1 , III 



190 North State Street 
ANdover 3-0800 



a 



I'ONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 1959 



95 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



"Formula thinJcing" and agency red tape is preventing many advertisers from 
taJcing full advantage of the spot tv medium, according to Bob McAndrews, sta- 
tion manager of KBIG, Los Angeles. Here's a blunt, forthright statement on 
certain agency business practices which should prove an eye-opener to many ad 
managers, as well as agency principals. The McAndrews letter is No. 4 in the 
new SPONSOR series, '^The Seller's Viewpoint." Send us your contribution! 




Does your agency wear these strait jackets? 



" ive years ago national spot accounted for 5% of our 
business. Today the figure is 20%, and climbing steadily 
in both dollar volume and share of total gross. That 
should be enough to prove that I love agencies placing 
national spot; and that the following response to sponsor's 
invitation applies only to an agency minority, who perhaps 
can profit by re-examining certain buying practices. 

These few agencies pay lip-service to the beauty of spot's 
flexibility. They have sizable timebuying departments, 
ostensibly to take full advantage of this attribute of the 
medium. Over coffee or cocktails they contrast the loose- 
ness and freedom of spot with the necessarily stiffer poli- 
cies of network. Then they turn right around and confine 
themselves in strait jackets more inflexible (but certainly 
less essential) than the nets in their most rigid days. 

Strait jacket #1: Agency gives timebuyers a norm based 
on national averages, allowing no area of personal judg- 
ment to take advantage of local conditions. Sample: a 
food account asked for Monday-through-Friday, driving 
times only. We suggested weekends instead, offering avail- 
abilities with superior in-home and out-of-home audiences, 
lists of top local food buyers using weekend radio exclu- 
sively, proof that all members of the family are reachable 
Saturdays and Sundays. As a clincher, we surprised this 
eastern agency with the news that Los Angeles Area super- 
markets traditionally are open on Sundays; we gave names 
of major chains where Sunday is the third or fourth big- 
gest volume day of the week. The agency acknowledged the 
logic, but refused to change its pattern because "we can't 
afford the additional overhead of changing the plan for 
just one market." 

Can't afford a few man-hours for more efficient selling 
in the nation's #2 market? I wonder if that agency 



would have volunteered the same explanation to the client. 

Strait jacket #2: Agency establishes cost-per-1,000 cut- 
off point based on ratings in individual markets. It recog- 
nizes that high-power stations have ratings in several 
major markets, but timebuyers are allowed to use only 
surveys in the station's home town. Our station has losti 
national orders to stations with a better cost-per-1,000 in 
Los Angeles. It has won many more orders from less con- 
fined agencies who include our audiences in San Diego 
and San Bernardino-Riverside, producing an area cost-per- 
1,000 which is unbeatable. The strait- jacketed agencies ad- 
mit that their product is distributed in all parts of south- 
ern California; but they can't be bothered to change their 
paper principle that only Los Angeles counts. | 

Strait jacket #3: Agency regards its own Los Angeles 
branch office with condescension, ignoring (or, more usual- 
ly, never requesting!) its recommendations. Station sales- 
man is told not to bother submitting list of accounts for 
which L. A. branch buys his station. (This attitude seems, 
especially prevalent among buyers who boast that they 
personally have never been west of the Mississippi.) \ 

A buying delegation from an eastern agency set up shop| 
in a Los Angeles hotel for a week of monitoring local sta- 
tions and listening to presentations. At the end of the 
week they made their buys. A mile away was the well- 
staffed branch office of that same agency, which goes; 
through the mill of monitoring, buying, renewing and can-i 
celing Los Angeles stations 52 weeks a year. No one at the 
branch office was invited to sit in at the hotel ... no one. 
there even got a courtesy phone call! 

But don't get me wrong . . . these strait jackets donT 
apply to your agency, I know! ^ 



86 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER 195C 



TICKET 




a summons, a label, notice of violation. Case in point: 
everyday timebuyers violate their client's confidence. They 
use old, outdated surveys, projected Metro reports, ill-ad- 
vised magazine research departments to establish a television 
station's circulation. WSAU-TV believes that for a true 
evaluation, buyers must depend on recent , AREA research 
conducted by a company whose business is research. 
WSAU-TV's close-a-hand representatives has all the infor- 
mation on such a report for Wisconsin -- give him a hearingi 



WISCONSIN* VV iOjlVLJ " X V 



. WAUSAU, 
WISCONSIN 



Represented by THE MEEKER CO., INC. and HARRY HYETT (Mpls.) 



PONSOR • 17 OCTOBER 1959 



87 



't 1 




SPONSOR 



A sound and forthright statement 

Those recent Congressional hearings on tv quiz shows 
produced little that the industry can be proud of or happy 
about. 

Even though the offending programs are now off the air, 
the quiz situation was a messy one, reflecting discredit on 
the entire tv medium. 

One thing, however, did emerge from the Washington ses- 
sions: a fine and forthright statement by Walter D. Scott, 
exec. v.p. of NBC. 

Said Scott, "The National Broadcasting Co. regards rigging 
of quiz shows as 'a breach of public faith and a blight on a 
program type that otherwise can be both entertaining and 
instructive. No such practice can be justified." 

We believe Scott's words deserve emphasis Ijecause a num- 
ber of people in both tv and advertising have been confused 
about the "morality" of quiz show fixing. "If we have 
phoney wrestling matches, why not phoney quiz shows?" 
they say. 

The answer is that any program which tv presents as 
straight, honest and above board, must be kept scrupulously 
that way. To rig it or tamper with it is, as Scott says, "a 
breach of public faith." 

The Seller's Viewpoint 

Four issues ago, sponsor started a new, experimental fea- 
ture, "The Seller's Viewpoint" (see page 86). 

Within a month it has proved one of our most successful 
and valuable departments. 

When we began it we wondered whether sellers of air 
media time and facilities would be willing to open up — to 
talk with no holds barred about common industry problems. 

We needn't have had any such fears. As you have seen, 
"The Seller's Viewpoint" letters contain frank, constructive 
suggestions, important to every agency and advertiser. We 
urge you to follow this feature carefully. And if you are a 
seller in air media, please send us your viewpoint. 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR: More first-hand 
knowledge on the part of agencies and adver- 
tisers of local markets and local radio and tv 
facilities. Only a grass-roots approach can 
discover the true potentials of the air media. 



88 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Aloneness: Jim Murray, account 
exec at WCAE, Pittsburgh, made a 
radio pitch to a Pittsburgh introduc- 
tory and social service organization 
(similar to Welcome Wagon), got 
this reply from its manager: "Please, 
Mr. Murray, not now! The steel 
strike has made business so bad, 
we're even lonesome ourselves!" 

Conflict: Or, which tradepaper got 

the straight story? 
HELENE CURTIS DROPS BEST 
SHOP, SCREENS AGENCIES 
— Headline, Advertising Age, 14 

Sept. 
BEST RESIGNS CURTIS 
— Headline, Broadcasting, 28 Sept. 

Rabbif talk: "I very much doubt 
we'll get any better tv reception," 
said one bunny to another, "with 
a 'people - eared' antenna." — Frank 
Hughes. 

Classical: As birth announcements 
go, how's this for a classic from Vic 
Piano, of PGW Radio? Carrying 
illustrations of pianos, the card says: 
"The Pianos, Vic and Louise, have 
added another little Baby Grand." 

Hail and farewell! When CBS 
Films recently moved to 477 Madi- 
son Ave., Vice President Sam Cook 
Digges suddenly found himself across 
the street from WCBS TV (488 Madi- 
son) where he had been general 
manager. For the occasion, the old 
gang at WCBS TV constructed a 25- 
foot sign, held it out of their office 
windows on the sixth floor, phoned 
Digges to look out of his window 
What he saw spelled out in letters twc 
feet high was, "Sam Cook Digges, Gc 
Home." Then the gagsters flipped thf 
sign; the other side read, "We Bu\ 
Only Feature Film." 

Ups and down: The first installatior 
of closed-circuit tv for self-service 
elevators has been made in a N.Y 
apartment by Elba Mgmt. Corp. It en 
ables the lobby attendant to observe 
the interior of the car at all times 

Educational: From a WNEW-TV' 
N.Y.C., program listing — 7:30. Lii\ 
Like A Champion: Judo expert < lit 
Freeland will demonstrate how (^ 
a small youngster can perform sc > 
ingly impossible feats, with basn, 
knowledge of judo holds. Down niti 
switchblades! 



SPONSOR 



17 OCTOBER VJr 




/' 




in Pittsburgh 

.aEe TAE and See 

best >A/ay to deliver the goods 
in the gro\A/ing Pittsburgh market! 




ywTAE 

^ -. e/c mmsm J|^ /« htjsbuiigh 



BASIC ABC IN PITTSBURGH 



RESPNTEO 



^ ( 





Putting your monej 
on the ivinner 
makes you a ivinnei 

is 61-1 

in KANSAS CITY! 



CONGRATULATIONS! — to all you alert time buyers usin 
KMBC-TV and KMBC-KFRM Radio this fall and winter! 



Look at this line-up: "Maverick" pulling out fa^ 
and farther ahead of any competition . . . "Wyatt E 
in a brand-new setting and series . . . "Cheyenne" 
with Clint Walker . . . Pat Boone . . . Dick Clark w 
new show on a peak evening . . . "77 Sunset Strip" 



With the ABC-TV network already sporting 5 of the 10 
top programs in prime-time evening viewing . . . and 
headed for even greater dominance as fast-starting, 
sure-fire bets enter the field — the wise money rides on 
Channel 9 in the great, prosperous Kansas City area. 

PLUS GREAT NEW ABC-TV SHOWS 

. . . new hours and hours of pulling power — every night of 
the week — "The Alaskans" . . . "Bourbon Street Beat" . . . 
"Adventures in Paradise" . . . Cliff Arquette's "Hobby 
Lobby" . . . "Hawaiian Eye" . . . "The Untouchables" . . . 
and more . . . more . . . more! 

PLUS FINE STATION-PRODUCED PROGRAMS 

Channel 9's own locally matchless news-weather-and-sports 
coverage . . . "Impact" and "Shock" Theaters ! New daytime 
magnetism, too! — with desirable one-minute Avails if you 

^^^ ^^^^' Channel 9's new Ampex Videotape Recorders 

PLUS TALL TOWER-MAXIMUM POWER PLUS "VIDEOTAPE HEADQUARTERS" 

Channel 9's high tower, top power that reaches 34,142 more MOST ADVANCED VIDEOTAPE— lifelike as life i 
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/h 



Kansas CiW ^^ Swing «fol»(MRQ-T\/' Q 




Kansas City's Most Popular and Most Powerful TV Station 
and in Radio the Swing Is to 



DON DAVIS, President 
JOHN SCHILLING, Executive 
GEORGE HIGGINS, Vice Pres 
ED DENNIS, Vice President 
MORI GREINER, Television AA 
DICK SMITH, Radio Manager 



f^ 



r^^UP- 



Petters G 
KMBC V Kansas City - KFRM ^ the State of Kansas ^ .^Z^^^ 



24 OCTOBER 19 59 1> 
40( a copy«S8 a year 



SPON 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




ADVERTISERS USE 



i 



r choice accommodations . . . 










$-f* 



k'ir^ 



stay with the 
Storz Stations 

(each preferred in its market) 



KANSAS CITV 5TAV Wl 










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iSSl 






NEW TRENDS 
IN TV 
SPOT BUYS 

NBC Spot Sales survey 
sheds new light on why 
and how agency time- 
buyers select their spots 

Page 27 



Pop music poll 
heading for a 
controversy 

Page 32 



i 






Where there's 
a Storz Station . 
there's audience 



The 

STORZ 

Stations 

today's Radio 
tor today's selling 

Todd Storz. Preside 
Home Office: Omahi 

WDGY, WHB, KOMA, WQAM 

represented by John Blair & Co. 
WTIX represented by Adatn Young Inc. 



How to ready 
retailers for a 
big air campaign 

Page 34 



SPONSOR'S 8th 
annual farm 
radio/tv section 

Page 37 




THE 



QUALITY 



TOUCH 





WFAA 



radio & television • dallas 

Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORTH market 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



There are no short cuts to 

quality, as evidenced by the beautiful 

prints produced by the 

age old process of stone lithography. 

Neither are there short cuts 

in the building of a quality image 

so precious in the operation 

of today's better radio and television 

stations. 



Represented by 



Edward Pelry 4 Co.. Inc. 



N 



The Original Station Representative 





W%^<K 



Aladdin made things happen in Arabia . . . and 





WPEN 

RADIO 
MAKES 
THINGS 
HAPPEN 
IN 
PHILADELPHIA 

WPEN is the only radio station in Philadel- 
phia with a fighting editorial policy. We 
believe in making sense rather than noise. 
And the mail response to our editorial 
campaigns is convincing proof that the 
public looks to WPEN for leadership. In 
Public Service — and in Sales — WPEN 
Makes Things Happen in Philadelphia. 



WF>EISI 



Represented nationally by GILL-PERNA 

New York. Chicago. Los Angeles. San Francisco. Boston. Detroit 

CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS 
WPEN, riuladrlpliia . . . WSAI, Cinrinriali . . . WALT, Tampa 



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it 
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dience Ratings have increased 
more than 15%. Call KATZ 
for information. 

WBIR-TV 



CHANNEL 



CBS 



10 



KNOXVILLE-TENN. 



© Vol. 13, No. 43 



24- OCTOBER 1959 



SPO Nl SOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Tv spot buyers tell why 

27 NBC Spot Sales checks panel group of agency buyers on spot preferences 
in terms of length, copy content, frequency, costs and consumer recall 

So I went on the air myself 

30 Showmanship, change of pace, shrewd scheduling builds $1 million busi- 
ness for Miami clothier who "stars" in his own $50,000 tv campaign 

Look who likes what music? 

32 Seattle station and IBM poll listeners on five music types, find rock 
'n' roll second teen-age favorite and million-sellers over-all champs 

How to pre-seli radio/tv 

34 Part two, in a continuing sponsor series, recounts recent examples of the 
showmanship involved in promoting a program to one's own salespeople 



FARM RADIO AND TV, 1959 

37 sponsor's 8th annual review of farm broadcast media covers trends in 
programing and gives current examples of advertisers using it. Also 
included are three pages of data on farm audiences and the farm market 

38 The medium: a revolution in programing? 
40 The market: biggest study now underway 
4-2 Case history: a client uses network radio 
43 Basics: audience and market facts 



FEATURES 

9 Commercial Commer.taiy 

58 Film-Scope 

12 49th and Madison 

66 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

4 Newsmakei of the Week 

66 Picture Wrap-Up 

16 Reps at Work 

78 Seller's Viewpoint 



62 Sponsor Asks 

60 Sponsor Hears 

2 1 Sponsor-Scope 

80 Sponsor Speaks 

64 Spot Buys 

80 Ten-Second Spots 

76 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

57 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & oth 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid 

©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
I. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. Birmingham 
-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunsel 
Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11. 
ler Western Hemisphere Countries $9 I 
copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weeklt 
at Baltimore, Md. 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



NO MORE ROOM 
AT THE TOP! 



There's room for just one station at the top in any tele- 
vision market — and in Central Iowa that station is 
WHO-TV! 

For example, in the NSI Report for 27 Iowa counties 
(Julv, 1959) WHO-TV delivers more homes in more 
quarter hours than any other station. ARB (see below) 
gives WHO-TV the No. 1 position in the metropolitan 
area, too. 

Local programming is a true measure of WHO-TV's 
determination to stay on top. Selections from our large 
library of film packages*, featured each weekday along 
with regular news reports on Family Theatre (Noon- 
2 p.m.). The Early Show (4:30 p.m.-6:05 p.m.) and 
The Late Show (10:30 p.m. -Sign-Off), deliver more 
homes in 190% more quarter hours than Stations 'B' 
and 'C combined! 

WHO-TV's goal of continuing leadership is being 
met with the best in progamming, personnel and public 
service. Ask your PGW Colonel for spots at the top in 
Central Iowa television on WHO-TV! 




*WARKER BROTHERS "Feature' and "Vanguard-' -k MGM Groups 
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"Big 50- • SCREEN GEMS "Sueet 65" • HOLLYWOOD TELE- 
VISIOS SERVICE "Constellation" ic M and A ALEXANDER "Im- 
perial Prestige" -if ABC's "Galaxy 20" and others. 



• 


ARB SURVEY 




METROPOLITAN DES MOINES AREA 




(March 16-April 12, 1959) 


FIRST PLACE QUARTER HOURS 




Number Reported 


Percentage of Total 






1-Week 


4-Weel( 


1-Week 


4-Week 


WHO-TV 




233 


227 


50.0% 


48.7% 


Station K 




186 


197 


40.0% 


42.3% 


Slolion W 




27 


42 


6.0% 


9.0% 


Ties 




20 





4.0% 






WHO-TV is part of 

Central Broadcasting Company, 

which also owns and operates 

WHO Radio, Des Moines 

WOC-TV, Davenport 



WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 

uriiO-Tir 

channel 13 • Des Moines 

NBC Affiliate 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Hatter, Sales Manager 



© 



1^ 



;:^ Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc, 
National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



Between Atlanta 
and the Qulf . ♦ ♦ 
the only primary 

NBC 

outlet is ^ * * 

WALB-TV 

CH. 10— ALBANY, CA. 







• New 1,000 foot tower, 316,- 
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WALB-TV 




ALBANY, GA. 
CHANNEL 10 

Raymond E. Carow, General Manager 

Represented nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 

In the South by Jabes S. Ayers Co. 

One Rate Card 



H 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



These are the times that try broadcasters^ souls. Open 
season for pot-shots by everyone has been declared again. 
Bright spot for air media is the fact that between last week 
and 20 ISovember, ISational Association of Broadcasters 
will have held eight two-day conferences across the V. S. 

The newsmaker: Harold E. Fellows. 60-year-old. spark- 
plugging president and chairman of NAB who was once described 
in a magazine profile as "broadcasting's Mr. Ambassador," will be 
playing a sort of Paul Revere role during the next month as he barn- 
storms from conference to conference alerting broadcasters to the 
perils of this provocative period. 

Among Fellows' immediate concerns is the tv quiz show probe by 
the House Legislative Oversight 
Committee. "I will not try to ex- 
plain or justify this unfortunate 
situation," says Fellows. "Fm rec- 
ommending to the NAB Tv Review 
Control Board that serious consid- 
eration be given all the facts 
emerging from these hearings. 

"But our industry's own self- 
regulatory arm is prepared to set 
up whatever additional safeguards 
in the Tv Code are necessary to 
prevent rigging of tv programs. 
This industry proved, in four 
decades of service, it can clean its own house when necessary." 

Fellows is a firm believer in broadcasters doing their own house- 
cleaning. "Broadcasting," he says, "has only one boss — the public. 
The free American system of broadcasting is the best ever devised." 
It also is his conviction that the individual broadcaster is the best 
judge of what the public wants, and that this is reflected in the NAB 
Code. It is small wonder he is "disturbed" by the quiz show probe. 
It is just one of many threats from many directions against the 
freedom of broadcast. Although these threats now appear to be 
leveled mainly at networks, if any outside substance injects itself 
there, it can eventually spread through to the last small station. 

Indeed, one of the highlights of last week's opening conference 
in Washington, D. C, was a scary "1948" version of what could 
happen if broadcasting fell under total government control, given by 
William Carlisle, NAB manager of station relations. Sample: "We 
now bring you live from the Bird Sanctuary a program made possi- 
ble (and in fact insisted upon) by the U. S. Interior Dept. . . ." 

NAB, which has increased its membership about 61% since 
Fellows took over in 1951, along with Fellows himself, are out to see 
this doesn't happen — and no more quiz scandals either. ^ 




Harold E. Fellows 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 




Oklahoma Cifn «»"* ^*- 

. POPULAR MUSIC »Ear 

.LOCAL, NATIONAL AND REGIONAL NEWS COVERAGE 

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THROUGHOUT EACH DAY 

. MATURE, RESPECTED AIR SALESMEN 

. MORE LOCAL ACCOUNTS THAN ANY OTHER STATION 
IN THE MARKET 

.SALES RESULTS! 



See your EAST/man for 
documentation of 
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*ADULT TYPE PROGRAMMING 





robert e. eastman & co.. 



inc. 



representing major radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

527 Madison Avenue 
New York 22, N.Y. 
PLaza 9-7760 



CHICAGO: 


SAN FRANCISCO: 


DALLAS: 


ST. LOUIS: 


LOS ANGELES: 


DETROIT: 


333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Financial 6-7640 


Russ BIdg. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

YUI<on 2-9760 


211 North Ervay BIdg. 
Dallas, Texas 
Riverside 7-2417 


Syndicate Trust BIdg. 
915 Olive St. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
CEntral 1-6055 


Taft Building 
1680 N. Vine St. 
Hollywood, Cal. 
Hollywood 4-7276 


Book Building 
Detroit, Mich, 
woodward 5-5457 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 




:^ 



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SPONSOR 

THE WtCKiy MAOazINC TV/B«OIO ADVERTISERS USE 

Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 
VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 
Manaeing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Senior Editors 

Jane P'inkerton 
W. F. Mibch 

Midwest Editor CChicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 

Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 
Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 

Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Charles Eckert; 
Gilda Gomez 




In two weeks 
your station (WFDF) 
averaged over 20 
entries per commer- 
cial. Other Michigan 
stations averaged 
five. Proof that your 
listeners act. 



99 



The quote is from Hartley C. Baxter of 
Simonds, Payson Company, Inc., Port- 
land, Maine. He refers to a special 
contest offer placed on Michigan sta- 
tions for Red Rose Iced Tea, 

A commanding lead in the race for 
results Is our stock-in-trade here at 
WFDF. But there's more to the story. 
Here's the clincher from Mr. Baxter; 

"But most important of ail, a whole- 
saler in your area took on the Red Rose 
line. His sales have been steadily In- 
creasing since the initial order. Proof 
again that your listeners, both trade 
and consumers, buy!" 

The Katz Agency can give you a full 
run-down on the Red Rose success 
story ... and tell you how and why 
WFDF is the Flint area "Results 
Tested" Station. Call now! 



WFDF 



5 KW at 910 on the dial for Flint &. 
ail of Northeast Michigan. 

Represented nationally by the KATZ 
Agency. 

Flint Affiliate of ("^B 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959' 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western nevada) 



BEELINE «Ao.o 




Siiperhighu-ay serves Fresno's 
people, agriculture and industry 



Fresno county leads the nation in gross farm income 
with over $284 million. Yet agriculture is only one 
phase of Fresno's growing economy — an economy 
which yields a total net effective buying income 
of $597 million.* 

Fresno is the center of an active and growing in- 
dustrial and service area. This is typical of all the 
cities on the Beeline. Get your 
message to people of all types 
with Beeline radio. 

Purchased as a group, Beeline 
stations give you more radio 
homes than any combination of 
competitors ... at by far the low- 
est cost per thousand. 
(Nielsen and SR&D) 



*Sales Management's 1959 
Survey of Buying Power 




I KOH b >CNO 

KFBK O Sacramento 

KBEE O MODESTO 
KMJ OHESNO, 

KERN O BAKEDSFIEIO 






im^ClodbdU/^ l^ftoOidaKstiM^ OtnvLfjaA^ 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



PONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



There was this 
bootlegger 
in Tulsa . . . 




HIS SUN shone brightly. He enjoyed brisk 
demand for his wares. Distribution and 
brand acceptance were excellent. His 
share of market was exhilarating; reorders rolled 
in with impressive regularity. 

Then disaster struck. Lawmakers legalized 
liquor. He became the victim of technological 
unemployment. 

In the thirties? No. In the summer of 1959, 
when Oklahoma prohibition— on the books 
since statehood was achieved in 1907— was 
finally repealed. 

Earth-shattering? Hardly— but interesting 
to Comment' s audience. 

* * * 

KOTV, the Corinthian station in Tulsa, 
offers the new Comment as a showcase for con- 
troversy. Comment is a place for almost anything 
that stimulates thinking and discussion. Repeal 
. . . integration . . . labor reform . . . the opinions 
of a former leader of the Oklahoma Communist 



Party ... if it's informative, intriguing or mean- 
ingful for people in the Tulsa market, it belongs 
on Comment. 

Comment follows the new 10:00 p.m. Eye- 
witness News, which brings the advances of 
electronic journalism to the Tulsa market. To 
present this newscast-Comment strip, five nights 
a week, KOTV has pre-empted high-rated net- 
work and syndicated shows. 

Corinthian beheves— and our research bears 
us out— that there is a deeper public interest in 
local, national and world affairs than many even 
in television itself have realized. We believe that 
a local station must shoulder an important part 
of the medium's responsibility to meet that need. 

We suspect, incidentally, that strong news 
and public affairs departments have something 
to do with our leadership in most of our markets. 
We also suspect that viewer confidence in our 
stations may have something to do with the 
believability of our clients' commercials. 

Responsibility in Broadcasting 



m 



^ 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 






KOTV 

Tulsa (Petry) 



KHOU-TV 

Houston (c^s-i\Spot Sales) 



KXTV 

Sacramento (H-R) 



>VANE-TV 

Fort Wayne (Petry) 



^VISH-TV 

Indianapolis (Boiling) 



>VANE-AM 

Fort Wayne (Petry) 



>VISH-AM 

Indianapolis (Petry) 



by John E. McMillin 



I 



h 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 




Commercial 
commentary 



That quiz show mess 

One thing, at least, you've got to admit about 
those Congressional hearings into the tv quiz 
shows: they threw a lot of great Big Brains into 
a traumatic state of complete moral bewilderment. 

Now that Rep. Harris & Co. have given us a 
respite (until 2 November) in their Galahadian 
probe, I think it is sort of fun and sort of appro- 
priate to try to untangle some of the gushy non- 
sense that has been written and spoken about the late great Fix Mess. 

To begin with, of course, the whole idea of the quiz show investi- 
gations contained a pip of a poser, a $64,000 question that staggered 
some of the foremost doubledomes of show biz. and Mad. Ave. 

The question (and no coaching from the audience, please) was 
this: can a thing be immoral if it is not illegal? 

That's exactly the same kind of sneaky brain-twister you'd give to 
a freshman class in Ethics at Wellesley or Radcliffe. And some of 
the boys, apparently meeting it for the first time in their grownup 
lives, showed exactly the same kind of flustered, girlish confusion. 

"No crime was committed," a tv program producer told me plain- 
tively, "so what is everybody hollering about?' 

"They got paid, din' they?" said another Broadway Socrates. 
"And besides, what about them wrestling matches."' 

Lady Chatterley's Doerfer 

Them poor wrestling matches! 

Throughout all the tortured testimony, the memory of those hoked 
up wrastling exhibitions croaked in the background like a rachitic 
Greek chorus, reminding us of our all too parallel transgressions. 

"It's entertainment, Abe. and you gotta give people a show." 

But the moral confusion engendered by the Barry-Enright-Do«o — 
Twenty-One disclosures did not stop with such comparatively simple- 
minded pronouncements. 

It slopped over into all sorts of strange pastures, and spewed forth 
from all sorts of odd mouths. For instance: 

A well-known New York radio tv columnist became so overwrought 
by the hearings that he concluded everyone was at fault — the net- 
works, the producers, the contestants, even the public — and wrote a 
piece of passionately purple prose to prove his gloomy conviction 
that the "times is out of joint." 

A leading radio/tv tradepaper screamed editorially that the "real 
tv quiz scandal" was the hearings themselves, and maintained that 
the "real purpose" of the investigation was to spread the name of 
Chairman Oren Harris in newspapers throughout the country. 

Along Madison Avenue admen muttered cloak-and-dagger hints 
that the whole thing was a Government plot to get certain big name 



"SUNNY" is the 

Xl ADULT 
7 / WESTERN 
J I STATION* 




The Western Coast of Florida, 
that is! If you're shootin' for 
adults in this territory, better 
hire the top gun . . . WSUN! 
"Sunny" is No. 1 in adult lis- 
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throughout the entire 24 hour 
broadcast day! And Pardner, 
WSUN delivers more homes, 
at the lowest cost per horrte 
of any station in the heart of 
Florida!** 



*Pulse, 6-'59 

**NCS2 




TAMPA -ST. PETERSBURG 



Natl. Rep: VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 
S.E. Rep: JAMES S. AYERS 



10 



Commercial commentary {continued) 



advertisers, while tv men howled that it was a print media conspiracy 
against the sanctity of video. 

Ministers thundered from pulpits that tv had broken faith with 
the public by destroying the "egghead image" which had replaced the 
cowboy image and the gangster image in the minds of impressionable 
youth. 

The head of the N. Y. Grand Jury sneered that the Harris Commit- 
tee was trying to indict "individuals" whereas the Grand Jury had 
been interested in "principles." Hot-eyed aficionados in Park Avenue 
bars and Third Avenue saloons argued bitterly that it was "unethical'' 
to hold hearings since the "damn shows are off the air an)^vay." 

And to top it all off Chairman Doerfer of the FCC, baited bv the 
House Committee to admit a responsibility greater than the law, 
made the fatal and incomprehensible mistake of trying to introduce 
"Lady Chatterley's Lover" into a discussion of free speech. 

Ladies and gentlemen, it was a mess, a mixed-up, snafued, mental 
and moral mess. And we haven't yet seen the last of it. 



A preface to tv morals 

But perhaps, between now and the time when Charles Van Doren 
and the $64,000 Challenge must face their Capitol Hill punishment, 
we can manage to unscramble some of the essentials. 

In the first place, let's admit honestly that the quiz show scandals 
have taught all of us a much-needed, and sobering lesson. 

Up to now, I don't think we have quite fully realized the unique 
status which tv has achieved with the public, or the unique responsi- 
bilities which the industry's position imposes on us. 

Despite all the proud boasts we've made about tv's power and 
glamour, we haven't seen clearly until now that tv has become the 
nations No. 1 Public Utility, and is so regarded by many people. 

The outcry about the quiz shows is in itself proof of the fact that 
the public demands more of tv. To assume that the industry can be 
operated on the ethical standards of a carnival peep show is as 
absurd as thinking that Americans would stand for a Telephone 
Company, operated like a Las Vegas honky tonk. 

A second point, too, has been hammered home to us. Every one 
of us who has ever bought programs for the air — and this includes 
agencies, advertisers, stations and networks — knows only too well 
that show business has its undesirable elements. 

Most of us have been tempted, and most of us with any experience 
have occasionally succumbed to the temptation of doing business 
with the Pal Joeys and Running Sammies of the entertainment world. 

Certainly now we have dramatic evidence of what this kind of 
compromising can lead to. And we damn well better cut bait. 

Finally, the quiz show investigations have thrown a glaring light 
on our own ethical immaturity. Let's face it. Most of us have been 
trying to decide questions of right and wrong on the basis of ex- 
pediency or efficiency — what makes a dollar, or attracts an audience 
or keeps us out of jail is right and good. Anything else is immoral. 

What cheap high-school sophistry for grown up men ! ^ 



4 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



•Y.' 



^hiL 



■0^ P^ 



. said the immortal Jolson. And **you ain't seen nothin" like the re- 
wnse you'll get when you program this great local spectacular — 



rHE JAZZ SINGER 



starring 



AL JOLSON 




\ 




This Is The Original History-Maker 
. . . This Is Today's Money-Maker! 

Already bought by WMAL-TV 
Washington, D. C; WOR-TV New 
York; KHJ-TV Los Angeles; WN AC- 
TV Boston; CKLW-TV Detroit; 
WMAR Baltimore. 



The Time: NOVEMBER 1958 
The Place: SYMPHONY THEATRE, N. Y. 
The Response: HELD-OVER ACCLAIM 
The Critic: BOSLEY CROWTHER 

"The other day, the Symphony Theatre at 2537 
Broadway tempted fate by bringing in a revival of 
the historic film "The Jazz Singer", generally ac- 
cepted as the film that introduced the "talkies". 
Attendance has been so favorable that it was held 
over for a second week. THE MANAGEMENT 
HAS BEEN PARTICULARLY HAPPY TO 
NOTE THE LARGE NUMBER OF YOUNGER 
PEOPLE SEEING IT." 



u.a.j. 



For full details, write, wire or phone: 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCiATED.mc. 



POWER 



• your most 
potent selling wedge! 




-and in the Detroit Area 

you get eitiier or botli 

at tiie Lowest Rates of 

any otiter l\/laJor Station, 




>• 



GENERAL OFFICES 

♦ ^» GUARDIAN BLDG. • DETROIT 26, MICH 



ROBERT E. EASTMAN & CO. J. E. CAMPEAU YOUNG TELEVISION CORP. 

Noll Radio Rep Prescdenl Natl TV Rep 




12 



49th ar 
IVIadisoi 



Impressive job 

It was indeed very kind and generous 
of you to give our new television/ra- 
dio alignment ( "NL&B's New 3-Way 
Radio/Tv Setup") such prominent 
coverage in your 3 October issue, and 
I am personally most appreciative. 

The story very accurately reported 
our new concepts and plans, and I 
assure you that many people have 
favorably commented to us about 
"the story in SPONSOR." 

Maurice Needham 

pres. 

Needham, Louis arid Brorby, Inc. 

Chicago 

Off the track! 

I was amazed at your article in 
SPONSOR, 3 October, containing ref- 
erence to "National's rock and roll- 
ers." First of all, at least two of the 
four singers you mentioned are most 
certainly NOT rock and rollers — Jean- 
nie Thomas, and Tommy Mara. Sec- 
ondly, Jeannie Thomas is NOT a 
"struggling youngster." She is a 
youngster, though — all of 22, but she 
has an excellent income via radio and 
Tv commercials, and night club ap- 
pearances. I have been her personal 
manager since last January, and am 
happy to report she has been making 
great progress toward stardom. 

As Tommy Mara's manager up un- 
til October 1st, I might have appreci- 
ated your left-handed compliment if 
it were true — "Mara, with a vast hypo 
on the part of his manager-press 
agent, even came up with a record 
that made enough noise to give some 
people the impression it was a luke- 
warm hit. It wasn't." Well, now, Joe, 
what is a hit? Mara's waxing of 
"Where the Blue of the Night" was 
truly a big hit on the disk jockeys' 
turntables. It was one of those records 
d.j.'s enjoy programing. There was 
no hypo; if there had been, perhaps 
the platter might have sold like a hit. 
The record was played like a hit, and 
in the minds of the public and trade, 
(Please turn to page 14) 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



I..1 III ' m mmmmmmmtmmiHKm 







FO/^ MOR£ COAfSi/Af£/^ 

than any other A/or//r ^^ro//. 



'I^^OA,, 




^/f^A 



^O/, 



THIS FACT FACES YOU ! 



PROOF: 

Within its Grade A telecasting area, WSJS-Television reaches 
a consumer population of 1,393,420 with total spendable income 
of $1,827,286,000. In North Carolina's biggest Metropolitan 
market located in the rich industrial Piedmont, the WSJS- 
Television market represents a more powerful buying force 
than that offered by any other North Carolina station. 



SPONSOR 



television 
Winston-Salem / Greensboro 

24 OCTOBER 1959 




CHANNEL 12 

Headley-Reed, Reps. 



13 



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570kc 
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FIRST 
ON 
YOUR 
DIAL 



wmca 

THE VOICE OF NEW YORK 

Call us collect at MUrray Hill 8- 1500 
Or contact AM Radio Sales. 



49TH & MADISON 

{Continued from page 12) 

Mara's disk was a hit. It certainly 
provided exposure that brought Mara 
offers he never had before. So, why 
piddle around as to whether or not it 
was a hit? 

I also wonder if you investigated 
the thinking of the National Shoe 
people? I know that in the case of 
Jeannie Thomas and Tommy Mara 
they knew they were not buying rock 
and roll artists. Miss Thomas was 
"Miss Virginia" in the 1956-57 "Miss 
Universe" contest, and she sounds as 
lovely as she looks. National Shoes 
receives a plus in her they never an- 
ticipated. When the tv spot began on 
the Alan Freed show, Jeannie was in- 
vited to appear at the opening of a 
new National Shoe store in Long Is- 
land. This was so successful that she 
did in-person dates at National Shoe 
stores in Trenton, Baltimore and Hill- 
side, N. J. These appearances tied in 
with either night club, radio, or tv 
dates, and all concerned benefited 
through the tieup. 

While I am not a spokesman for 
National Shoe, it is my feeling they 
wanted talented, clean-cut young peo- 
ple to "sell" their shoes, and they did 
not set out to engage rock and roll 
singers. I think where you went off 
the track was in your understanding 
that they bought rock and rollers. 
Sidney Ascher 
public relations 
N. Y. C. 

Goofed! 

In your interesting round-up of 
this season's automotive broadcasts 
(26 September, page 32) you have 
purloined the Steve Allen Plymouth 
show from N. W. Ayer and given it to 
another agency. Since we're very 
proud of this full-hour entry into a 
new time spot, we'd like to have it 
back! 

N. W. Ayer has been Plymouth's 
agency since 1943. Except for their 
former participation in the Lawrence 
Welk show, Ayer has handled all their 
radio and television. The Steve Allen 
Plymouth Show is the biggest effort 
yet. 

The debut was September 28, not 
October 12 as listed. 

Howard Davis 

Dir. of info. 

N. W . Ayer & Son Inc. 

Philadelphia 



HERE'S 

the place to look fo 

BUSINESS 



TALLAHASSEE 
THOMASVI LLE 




the bright spot in your 
sales picture . . . WCTV 
can make it brighter! 

With the great CBS programs, 
plus top ABC -TV shows, 
WCTV provides standout 
service to a most responsive 
market. In the entire U.S., 
Tallahassee stands fifth in re- 
tail sales per household.* 

For many leading brands, 
the Tallahassee - Thomasville 
Market deserves and gets 
strong spot schedules. A siz- 
able market - over 225,000 
families — 52 counties — effec- 
tively covered by WCTV. Get 
the complete picture from 
Blair Television Associates. 

'''Annual Survey of Buying Power, 
1959. 

WCTV 



TALLAHASSEE 



.KiL^- 



w 




THOMASVILl 

a John H. Phij.9 
Broadcasting Statu 



BLAIR TELEVISION A6800IATI> 

National Representatives 



14 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 195S 





L- LiSTii^eHiiLli... PiOPLi iHY iiilS ! 



You can't feel ideas. 

They live in the tiny curhcues of a man's brain. 
And occasionally, in a woman's brain. (These are 
called "notions.") 

Without ideas, our world would clunk to a halt. 
A fjood idea can make a good product even better. 
j It can take a hard, precise, metal-made thing like a 



sewing machine, for instance and make it different 
in a woman's mind. 

Make it be a dance in a rustling ballgown, maybe, 
or a soft little baby's shirtwaist. Make it be some- 
thing a woman has to have. 

People don't buy things just to eat, or wear or ride 
in anymore, Charlie. People buy ideas. 



YOUNG & RUBICAM, Advertising 

ewYork • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco • Los Angeles • Hollywood • Montreal* Toronto • London • Mexico City • Frankfurt • San Juan • Caracas • Geneva 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



15 



YOU 
KCANT 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 

KCEN-TV 




A.M. or P.M. 

more people in Central 
Texas watch us day and 
night over an area 73% 
greater than the sta- 
tion nearby... 




BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 



■A 



16 



m 



at work 




Mike Wurster, Weed Television Corporation, New York, feels that 
1960 will usher in an era of increased flexibility in television opera- 
tions. "Flexibility at the station level will be exemplified by an in- 
creased use of tv tape as a selling force and as a programing tool. 
This will tend to create 'floating option' time patterns, will encourage 
the stations to suit the specific 
market needs of the advertisers by 
investigating 'diagonal' rate struc- 
tures and offering improved pack- 
age plans. Also look for station 
trade character tie-ins with nation- 
al accounts. The representative, 
too, will expand his horizons and 
provide wider advisory services to 
stations, agencies and advertisers. 
Representatives are similarly work- 
ing out new business techniques 
aimed at curtailing burdensome 
paper work." Mike notes that agencies can encourage flexibility 
simply by placing less dependence on those tools which tend to re- 
strict buying. "I would like to see more of what I refer to as the 
'educated hunch' technique of buying. Experience, knowledge and 
creative effort are the foundation and impressive sales the result." 

Bob Mandeville, H-R Television, Inc., New York, is curious to 
know how many timebuyers and salesmen get to view the tv commer- 
cials they buy and sell prior to air time. "Unfortunately, not very 
many of us do. This state of affairs inhibits efficiency. Wherever 
possible, it would be helpful to have a meeting of representatives 

and buyers, whose campaign aims 
could be outlined, and where the 
reps would have an opportunity to 
view the finished story board or 
commercial before submitting 
availabilities. Much has been said 
about the increased effectiveness of 
those commercials set in the prop- 
er program climate. Certainly an 
adjunct to that kind of thinking is 
a positive approach toward re- 
leasing information to the rep who 
deals directly in providing that 
climate." Bob feels that when buyers and reps know the content of 
the film, they will be able to deal most intelligently with the particu-^ 
lar aims of the client. "Qualitative knowledge of the commercial | 
other than just brand name would create enthusiasm leading to thej 
best possible buy. The advertiser's dollar would be spent most] 
effectively, and this would assure his continued use of television."! 




SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 19.59 





ITC's New Series adds^ 
The Measurement 

Of Success 

that helps you get 

Low Cost-Per-Thousand 

Sales! 



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[ACKi DOUGLAS 




Creator of: 
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Now for the first time on television . . . the dazzhng world of 
success becomes a reality for television viewers. 30 whirlwind 
days in the life of a successful American captured in a half-hour 
of unusual entertainment each week. The ideal warm, friendly, 
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and their famous friends, who include Debbie Reynolds, Bing 
Crosby, Nina Foch, Groucho Marx, Anna Maria Alberghetti, 
Hugh O'Brian, Tina Louise, Ed Wynn, Hedda Hopper, Danny 
Thomas, Ronnie Burns, Sammy Davis, Jr., and many more — 
as they and you enjoy "Sweet Success." 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 

488 MADISON AVENUE • NEW YORK 22 • N. Y. • PLAZA 5-2100 

ITC OF CANADA, LTD. 

100 UNIVERSITY AVENUE • TORONTO I • ONTARIO • EMPIRE 2-1166 





VOOK FO/f 



.. -^'TH THe , ,^aS THE OCEAN. 

^Hip THAT ^'^ 



Blair Stations 

...for example, Old Spice 





To keep this "ship that sails the ocean" in front-running position, 
Shulton relies heavily on the selling power of Spot Radio — with 
saturation schedules in America's major markets. 

In many of these markets, Blair Stations carry a heavy share 
of the advertising attack. The simple fact is: BLAIR STATIONS 
SELL. Through applied audience-research, they have intensified 
the elements that give radio its real selling power: 

I Local interest programming, 2 Local selling personalities, 
which serves listeners who endow commercial mes- 
throughout the station's own sages with believability that 
area in a personal way no converts ratings into cash- 
distant source can equal. register results. 

Over 40 stations in major radio markets are represented by John 
Blair & Company — by far the most important group of markets 
and stations served by one representative firm. So when you're 
thinking about radio, as most advertisers are, talk with Blair. 



^s! Blair Stations Sell 

and these are the BLAIR STATIONS: 




A^*<:^ 



and Company 



National Representative of Major Radio Stations 



NewYork WABC 

Chicago WLS 

Los Angeles KFWB 

Philadelphia WFIL 

Detroit WXYZ 

Boston WHDH 

San Francisco KGO 

Pittsburgh WWSW 

St. Louis KXOK 

Washington WWDC 

Cleveland WHK 

Baltimore WFBR 

Dallas-Ft. Worth KLIF- 

KFJZ 

Minneapolis-St. Paul WDGY 

Houston KILT 

Seattle-Tacoma KING 

Providence WPRO 

Cincinnati WCPO 

Miami WQAM 

Kansas City WHB 

New Orleans WDSU 

Portland, Ore KGW 

Denver KTLN 



Norfolk-Portsmouth- 
Newport News 

Louisville 

Indianapolis 

Columbus 

San Antonio 



.WGH 

.WAKY 

.WIBC 

.WBNS 

.KTSA 

Tampa-St. Petersburg WFLA ! 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy.WTRY 

Memphis WMC 

Phoenix KOY 

Omaha WOW 

Jacksonville WMBR 

Oklahoma City KOMAl 

Syracuse WNDR| 

Nashville WSM ' 

Knoxville WHOX 

Wheeling-Steubenville WWVA 

Tulsa KRMGi 

Fresno KFRE: 

Wichita KFH 

Shreveport KEEL \ 

Orlando WDBO 

Binghamton WNBF 

Roanoke WSLS 

Bismarck KFYR 



20 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



14 OCTOBER 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INa 



Spot radio can chalk up a crackling success story in the Mennen^s campaign 
of last summer: it worked so well that the advertiser is doing it all over next summer. 

In telling about the campaign, which spent $550,000 via Warwick & Legler, this week. 
Bill Mennen, Jr., noted that contrary to what had been expected his field sales staflF main- 
tained an excitement over the values of radio to the very end of the campaign. 

His conjecture for this: The salesmen were able to hear the announcements in 
their cars as they covered their territories. 

The winners of the Mennen promotion contest tied in with the summer campaign: Ist, 
WHDH, Boston; 2nd, WEU, New Haven, 3rd, WMBR, Jacksonville. Special prize 
for stations in smaller markets: winner, KGBT, Harlingen, Tex. 



Something that tv stations haven't experienced before: So many national agencies 
inquiring in October what their chances are of getting the time they require for 
schedules starting in January. 

The queries have been directed primarily to stations in the top 10 markets. 



The relationship of media to the general strategy of a client's marketing cam- 
paign this week took a wide and significant turn at McCann-Erickson. 

So that the Media Department and the Media Planning Unit can be given maximum 
direction and guidance as part of the client's marketing complex they have been placed in 
a newly formed division, to be known as the Media Division. 

The new division will be composed of five senior mediamen, with no accounts as- 
signed them, and two marketing men, with the new division itself headed up by Crawford 
Patton, formerly of Warner Bros. Bill Dekker continues as head of the media depart- 
ment, while John J. Flanagan and Edwin Wilson will manage the planning unit. 

Patton will report to Daniel Kinley. Other divisions in the McCa-E homeoffice: the 
Creative Division, the Account Planning Division and the Account Service Division. 



Marketers believe that the fashion-type cosmetic and toiletries field is in for 
a lot of turmoil within the next few years. 

The cause: the shifting habits of dress and behavior among mounting millions of 



I ;•!' 



Effect on the two industries: an air of uncertainty in their long-range planning. 



Don't be surprised If P&G adds another division in its corporate setup which 
would function as an autonomous servicing division for the four present divisions. 

Under the present setup the toiletries, food and paper products divisions obtain 
their various services Hke media, programs, copy, ad production, market research and 
promotion from the case soap division. 

The fifth division would become the font for all these services. Most likely head of 
the new division: Edwin E. Snow, ad manager, recently made a v.p. 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



A promotional device that seems to be catching fire among radio statioi' 
across the country: bringing the talent in social contact with the various walks of ageni 
people at luncheons held in the studio or in restaurants. 

Some stations are making accountmen the focus of this talent conu*aderie o 
the theory that the medium could have no better man at court — the client. 



If you're looking for evidence as to what's happened to daytime viewing sint 
ABC TV became a force in daytime programing, observe this difference in the over-a 
average homes sets-in-use: September 1958: 2,370,000; September 1959: 2,446,000. 
As for average homes reached by sample ranking, also according to Nielsen: 
RANK 1958 1959 

1 3,741,000 4,824,000 

5 3,437,000 4,584,000 

10 3,219,000 3,783,000 

20 2,567,000 3,026,000 

40 1,697,000 2,047,000 

Note: ABC TV ushered in its Operation Daybreak in October 1959. i 



National spot radio, some of the rep leaders contend, has reached the poio 
where it must face up to the task of overcoming this hurdle: the big advertiser 
conception of the medium as something to be used mainly to bolster up a major mark( 
here and there. 

These reps recognize the complexity of this problem and the feeling of frustration it haj 
created among agency people who are sympathetic to spot radio and are aware o 
its positive values as a national medium. 

The solution, say such reps, entails a gigantic step in which the entire industry mus 
participate: a campaign dramatizing spot radio's status as a national medium. 

They estimate that this project will cost at least $2 million. 



NBC plans to move into the wired radio field in October 1960 with what will prob 
ably be known as a medical network. 

The service: music and informational programing to doctors' and dentists' office; 
from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. five days a week. The transmission will allow for multiplexing 
so that at five intervals daily the professional man can tune himself in to the airing of medi 
cal papers, etc. 

Subscriber prospects: 25,000 doctors and dentists in 16 markets at a weekly 
rental of $10 a month for the receiving equipment (that's where RCA comes in) . 

Advertising prospects: 10 ethical drug firms who will act as institutional spon 
sors of the service at a cost each of $6,500 a week. (Annual potential income for th 
medical network from this source: $3,380,000.) 



Department of close co-incidence: The ratio of billings contributed by the top \v 
tv network advertisers in 1958 was only 1% below what the top 10 accounted foij 
in network radio 10 years previously. \ 

The gross billings for all radio networks in 1948 was $198,995,742 and the 10 biggest 
customers absorbed 38% of it. In 1958 the first 10 advertisers represented 39% of all 
tv network billings, namely, $566,590,401. 

The only difference: the networks' stakes in them are three times as big. 

22 SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1955 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The three tv networks combined, with weekend non-prime-time and shows like 
Today and Jack Paar included, will average 27 sponsored hours a week more this 
month than they did in October 1958. 

The tally for everything is 151 hours as compared to 124 hours for last October. 
It's an all-time October high for ABC TV and NBC TV, while CBS TV is ahead of 
last year's October total but not quite up to the 1957 level. 

The breakdown of sponsored hours by network for the two Octobers: 





PRIME NIGHTTIME 


MON.-FRI. DAYTIME** 


NETWORK 


1959 


1958 


1959 1958 


ABC TV 


22 


171/2 


15 4 


CBS TV 


26 


241/2 


21 24 


NBC TV 


24 


21 


16 17 


Total 


72 


63 


52 45 



*Does not include the Jack Paar show; ** does not include Today. 



CBS TV's decision to wipe its schedule of substantial prize quizzes was not 
without its ironic touches, such as : 

1) Colgate's consequent announcement that it was replacing the Big Payoff with The 
Millionaire drew newsprint wisecracks to the effect that there was the biggest giveaway 
of all. 

2) CBS withdrew 24 hours later an offer to make December Bride available for but 
$10,000, time and talent, per quarter-hour. What happened meanwhile: December 
Bride was rushed into the breech left by the shelving of Top Dollar. (The average 
cost on CBS of a quarter-hour, time and talent, is $25,000.) 



Sales developers in tv are sharpening up a new tactic in a drive to increase 
daytime business. 

The main objective of this tactic is top management in the major agencies. 

They'll start off their pitch with the premise that with few exceptions agencies have 
confined themselves to the world of nighttime tv and have been delinquent in learn- 
ing about the uses and values of daytime tv. 

The recommendation they'll urge: Do like BBDO and set up a daytime specialist, 
whose function it will be to funnel information about and opportunities in tv to 
account and media people in the agency. 



Though it's much too early to tell how the nighttime tv network programing 
will shake down in popularity terms, agency showmen observed certain trends 
from the ratings already in hand. 

Here's the way, in a broad sense, they saw the outlook shaping up: 

WESTERNS: The newcomers as a whole have shown little signs of strength and 
even some of the holdovers are beginning to crumble under competition. How- 
ever, cost-per-thousand-wise the familiar contingent is expected to hold up nicely. 

SITUATION COMEDIES: The old timers look as though it won't be hard for them 
to hold their own, but as for the newcomers the prospects, with perhaps one or two 
exceptions, aren't too bright. 

CRIME-SUSPENSE; At the moment it's going to be a tough buildup for all but 
one, or perhaps two, of the new entrees, and one of the past season's sturdy pieces may 
lose enough audience from t}'pe-competition to make survival uneasy. 

ADVENTURE SHOWS: There isn't much promise among the whole incoming genre. 

VARIETY, STANDUP COMEDY: They, generally, look the hottest of all. 

24 OCTOBER 1959 23 



[■', 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Agencymen who've been on the road these past few months visiting tv stations 
report there appears to be a pronounced trend toward experimental live program- 
ing directed at teenagers in the very early a.m. 

This before-school-departure time has been so far pretty much of a monopoly for the 
Dave Garroway show. 

Among the recent pioneers at carving out this youngster audience for themselves on the 
pre-school schedule is KHOO-TV, Houston, (Corinthian). Included in the station's maga- 
zine format is variety talent from area high schools and topical discussions of teen- 
age issues. 

You can get a pretty good clue as to how the leading tv advertisers in the package goods 
field will stack up this year in network and spot time expenditures from these compara. 
tive six-months totals: 

ADVERTISER JAN.-JUNE 1958 JAN.-JUNE 1959 

P&G $41,215,181 $49,520,767 

Lever Bros. 18,490,563 25,274,111 

Colgate Palmolive 17,481,821 20,152,527 

General Foods 16,461,849 18,614,860 

American Home 12,077,818 17,777,121 

R. J. Reynolds 9,049,551 9,724,156 

P. Lorillard 7,614,609 9,222,893 

Bristol-Myers 9,913,029 9,167,236 

General Mills 5,447,851 8,533,499 

Liggett & Myers 6,570,153 7,963,472 

American Tobacco 6,792,624 7,959,682 

Warner Lambert 4,750,030 6,788,251 

Standard Brands 4,509,483 6,124,544 

Corn Products 2,619,536 4,707,983 

S. C. Johnson 3,517,263 4,152,944 

John Kluge's Metropolitan Broadcasting has expanded its ownership to four radio and 
two tv stations with the acquisition this week of WIP, Philadelphia and WTVH, Peoria, the 
latter representing a cash payment of $600,000. 

The WIP deal: Swap of 150,000 shares of Metropolitan stock and assumption of $2 
million in WIP liabilities. 

If spot tv weren't as prosperous as it is, it would have good cause to mourn 
the defection of Anahist (Bates) from its ranks into network tv spot carriers. 

The cold remedy is down for 93 minute participations on ABC TV and 23 like units on 
NBC TV at a collective cost of not far from $3 million. The average price per partici- 
pation being paid by Anahist is $25,000 on ABC and $30,000 on NBC. 

ABC TV can't begin to resolve how it's going to meet the discount structure 
changes triggered by CBS TV until it faces up to another problem: the pressure 
from affiliates in certain key markets for rate increases. 

It's obvious that no matter how the network revises its discount structure it doesn't give 
the stations more money, but the network must ease one pressure before it can dig 
into the discount problem. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 64; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 66; Washington Week, page 57; sponsor 
Hears, page 60; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 76; and Film-Scope, page 58. 

24 SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



i 



IT COMMUNICATES! 

A red cape may stimulate action in Madrid or Seville or Mexico City. But, if you have 
merchandise to move in Western Michigan, put your pesos on WOOD-TV. It really com- 
municates! Want to hear more? Just shout "iOle!" The Katz man will come charging in. 




WfOOD 



AM 
TV 



WOODIand Center, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 

WOOD-TV— NBC for Western and 
Central Michigan: Grand Rapids, 
Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon 
and Lansing. WOOD-Radio — NBC. 



I ' 





I 



It's Channel 3 First By All Surveys 



In Memphis they say "There's more 
to see on Channel 3." That's 
because more people enjoy WREC- 
TV's combination of superior local 
programming and the great shows 
of the CBS Television network. It's 
the right combination for your 
advertising message. See your Katz 
man soon. 



Here are the latest Memphis Surveys showing 
leads in competitively-rated quarter hours, 
sign-on to sign-off, Sunday thru Saturday: 



A.R.B. 

Apr. 17-May 14, 1959 
(Metro Area) 



AVREC-TV 
Sta. B 
Sta. C 



250 

80 
68 



Pulse Nielsen 

May 1959 June 8-Ang. 9, 1959 
(Metro Area) (Station Area) 

271 



309 

79 

7 



57 
69 



WREC-TV 

Channel 3 Memphis 



Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 




26 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 19' 



SPONSOR 




WHO INFLUENCES COMMERCIAL LENGTH? 



Agency timebuyers surveyed by NBC Spot Sales report creative departments in ad agencies 
have a more direct influence on the length of commercials than do the clients themselves.* 



REATIVE 
TAFF 



Total 
respondents 

No.i Percent- 



Radio and tv billing 

Over $5 million Under $5 million 

No.i Percent- No.i Percent- 



MICH mFLUEISCE 


168 


68 


75 


81 


93 


60 


LITTLE IISFLJJEJSCE 


61 


25 


16 


17 


45 


29 


:SO INFLUENCE 


18 


7 


2 


2 


16 


11 


LIENTS 


MVCH IISFLVEISCE 


92 


38 


45 


50 


47 


31 


LITTLE INFLUENCE 


136 


56 


42 


46 


94 


61 


ISO IISFLUEISCE 


16 


6 


4 


4 


12 


8 



ource: NBC Spot Sales October, 1959, survey of 249 panelists In 171 different agencies comprising its Timebuying Opinion Panel. 
Hal number of panelists responding to the question, spercent of the total respondents answering each question. 




rV SPOT BUYERS TELL WHY 



^ Country-wide survey shows agencies giving more 
ttention to best use of I.D.'s, 20's, minute tv spots 

^ 249 buyers in NBC Spot Sales poll list reasons and 
trategy behind choice of different spot commercial types 



^s tv screens flash an ever greater 
umber of commercials before acquis- 
ive consumers, agencies and radio/ 
t' media people who serve them are 
iiore vividly aware of the need for 
uying precision. Urgent question 
I hand: Can a short commercial 
fo a better selling job as an I.D. 
lan 60 seconds, or is long copy — 



requiring the minute — a must? 

NBC Spot Sales, reporting on its 
fifth questionnaire survey of media 
people in large and small advertising 
agencies all over the country, has 
pinpointed some of the new buying 
trends and several patterns involving 
length, cost and impact of tv com- 
mercial annoiinrements. 



A major conclusion, synthesized 
from comments of 249 panelists in 
171 agencies, is that the creative de- 
partment — copywriters, copy group 
heads and supervisors, artists and art 
directors — influence the length of 
proposed commercials far more than 
staffers in the agency media depart- 
ment or within the client company. 
Almost seven in 10 buyers (68%) 
noted the considerable influence 
exerted by creative, whereas only 
38% said there was much client in- 
fluence in selecting a short 10 or a 
long 60. There appears, however, to 
be more client influence when larger 
agencies are involved. 

Despite the dominance of creative 
people in the selection of lengths — 



PONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



27 



10-, 20-, 30- or 60-second commer- 
cials — the buying group is "always 
or frequently" consulted. So report 
seven in 10 of the buyers. And the 
remaining three buyers say they are 
"sometimes" consulted on length. 

The length of commercial most 
used, both by larger ( over $5 million 
billing) and smaller (under $5 mil- 
lion) agencies, is the full minute, 
followed in order of usage by 20-, 10- 
and 30-second announcements. A 
saturation campaign however, relies 



most heavily on 10-second I.D.'s, fol- 
lowed — at a considerable distance — 
by 20's and 60's. At one time or 
another, the survey indicated, eight 
in 10 timebuyers have recommended 
I.D. campaigns. The remaining two 
in the 10 said they would do so under 
special circumstances. 

Some of the advantages of the I.D. 
are outlined by Ralph S. Freeman, 
radio/tv director of Ross Roy, De- 
troit. 

"We have used I.D.'s many times. 



in almost every case to augm( 
other media schedules. The I 
takes advantage of a low-cost sal- 
ration package to register bral 
name, package (or logo) and ma\!- 
one selling point to a mass audien . 
In some cases, it's the only way ; 
a low-budget advertiser to reach !• 
mass audience at all." 

But Sam Vitt, media supervisor 
Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfie. 
New York, points out that "fromii 
media viewpoint, it is probable • 




Questionnaire was answered by 
249 media execs o^ 171 agencies. 
Sam Vitt, med. sup., Doherty Clif- 
ford, Steers & Shenfeld, N.Y.C.. 
says length is copy department 
problem. Alice Ross, buyer, 
Heineman, Kleinfeld, Shaw & 
Joseph, N.Y.C., agrees, adding 
that creativity is most important 
in shorter copy lO's and 20's. 




HOW COMMERCIAL LENGTH AFFECTS RECALL 







60-SECOND VS. 
20-SECOND 


20-SECOND VS. 
10SEC0ND 


High priced, hard goods 


item 






Much greater recall 




71** 


SI** 


Slightly greater 




23 


41 


No greater 




6 


8 


Lowr priced, high turnover item 


Much greater 




20 


28 


Slightly greater 




49 


49 


No greater 




31 


23 



*Answers indicate for each of twa types of products whether agency buyers believe the one-minute commercial aids greater "recall at time of shopping 
than a 20-second announcement, and whether 20-second has a recall advanta :e over the 10-seeond length. 
**Fi?iircs give the peicentage of total respondents answering the question. 



28 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 19^ 



mid find unanimous agreement as 

the virtues of the I.D. Yet it is so 

-ief, and this brevity is the problem 

-not a media one so much as a copy 

Se. The use and relative effective- 

■^ss of the several spot tv commer- 

al lengths must, in the ultimate, be 

■solved in the copywriter's realm." 

)me details of preferred time lengths 

)pear in the adjacent chart. 

Most of the panelists (eight in 10) , 

reporting on their use of 30-second 

inouncements, said they have not 

iad reason to recommend a half- 

inute buy largely because this 

ngth is not available in many mar- 

?ts. Production of the announce- 

ent, therefore, is expensive in terms 

f the number of stations which al- 

w for it. The two in 10 who have 

ied 30 seconds, however, selected the 

me segment for any of these possible 

■asons: if 30-second slots became 

lailable in prime time; if the copy 

!quired the extra 10 seconds over 

le 20 which they prefer; if more 

ations listed 30's on their rate card: 

a tie-in with local dealers could be 

it up following network shows; if 

ne cost were more reasonable. 

I Dick Pickett, senior media buyer 

|t Foote, Cone & Belding, New York, 

;ays the problem is "that 30's are 

ot generally available, and better 

ositions are usually taken by 20's 

nd lO's or both." Edward C. Jones, 

adio/tv director of Barlow Agency 

1 Syracuse, thinks 30's are especial- 

]/ adaptable to dairy products which 

on't require long demonstration. 

A minute spot often becomes badly 

aced because of lack of things to 

ay," he adds. 

: The major advantages of a 30-sec- 
nd commercial, the buyers contend: 
xclusivity in the station break, adja- 
ency to high-rated network pro- 
rams, availability in prime time and 
;0% greater length than a 20-second 
Announcement. 

i As to costing, panelists responded 
p a question about the 30-second 
ost compared with the combined 
rice of a 10 and a 20. In the $5 mil- 
ion-plus agencies, lO'/c of the time- 
•uyers think the 30 is a good buy at 
lore than the combined rate of a 10 



BUYERS RELATE MERITS OF 
DIFFERING TIME LENGTHS 

PREFERRED LENGTH OF COMMERCIALS 

8-, 10-sec. I.D. 20-sec. 30-sec. 60-sec. 



MOST CAMPAIGNS 


19* 


37* 


3* 


66* 


SOME CAMPAIGNS 


55 


47 


15 


29 


FEW CAMPAIGNS 


19 


10 


17 


5 


NO CAMPAIGNS 


7 


6 


65 


— 



PREFERRED TIME LENGTHS FOR SATURATION 

10-sec. 20-sec. 30-sec. 60-sec. 



OVER $S 

MILLION BILLING 41* 



33* 



25* 



UNDER $5 

MILLION BILLING 47 



27 



23 



USE OF TWO PRODUCTS IN ONE COMMERCIAL 





20-sec. 

No.** Percent* 


30- 

No.*'' 


sec. 

Percent* 


60 

No.** 


-sec. 

Percent* 


YES 


5 2 


8 


3 


68 


29 


NO 


232 98 


224 


97 


163 


71 



•Percent of total respondents to this portion of the question. 
•The number of panelists responding to the question. 



and a 20. And 46% of the buyers 
think it's a good buy at the same rate 
of a combined 10 and 20. 

Most of the panelists like a combi- 
nation of commercial lengths for a 
campaign, a major reason being the 
resulting discounts and lower prices. 
About eight in 10 panelists buy in 
combinations of minutes and I.D.'s. 

Herb Halpeni, radio/tv director of 
Winius-Brandon Co., St. Louis, says 
"We have found that for some house- 
hold products a combination of 30's 
and lO's is very effective during an 
introduction; 60's give the selling 
points while I.D.'s serve as effective 
reminders. However, the I.D. must 
have an attention-getting device that 
refers back to the 60." 



Timebuyers like to combine lengths 
of commercials in a campaign, but 
they look with skepticism on the com- 
mercial which plugs two products 
(see chart. aboveK Almost all of 
them (98%) dislike advertising two 
products within a 20-second commer- 
cial, and 97% don't like doing it even 
in a 30. But three in 10 ( 29% I think 
two products can be advertised effec- 
tivelv within a one-minute frame. 

The NBC Spot Sales survey also 
attempted to measure some reaction 
to consumer recall at the time of 
shopping (see chart, page 28). The 
question, as posed, involved two dis- 
tinctlv different types of products — a 
high priced, hard goods item and a 
i Please turn to page 74 I 



PONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



29 



so I WENT ON THE AIR MYSELF 




^ Miami clothier builds 
»1 million business as his 



own tv "star" endorsei 



^ Techniques: show- 
manly devices, conviction 
and fast schedule switches 



J^ersonal endorsement of a producl 
is a proven sales technique. It car 
prove a disaster, though, when the 
advertiser undertakes the role of en- 
dorser. Many ships have foundered 
on that particular shoal. 

With the proper degree of show 
manship and an ultra-convincing 
pitch, however, you can carry it off. 
You may even achieve the enviable 
position of the Miami clothier in the 
accompanying pictures, who step? 
from between the reels of a late 
movie about four times a week as 
virtually its star. 

Austin Burke spends over $.50,000 
a year to sell clothes via tv — for him. 
a logical extension of what he'd been 
doing for years. When he arrived in 
Miami in 194.5 "with $300 and asth- 
ma," he started saving for a clothingj 
store, in spite of the fact that there's 
a men's clothier around almost everyj 
corner in Miami. i 

By 1947, he had raised enoughi 
capital to open a small loft store on; 
the second floor of the building he| 
now owns. In 1948. he moved his 
shop downstairs. "But what I needed 
to expand," he says, "was advertising 
that wasn't cut out of the same cloth 
as every other clothing store." ^ 

By chance. WTVJ began opera- 
tions in Miami in 1949, and Burke 
decided to "star" in its late movies. 
'Our first impression of Burke was 



REITERATION WORKS, says Burke, H you 
use it to emphasize your own enthusiasm, con- 
viction. Fast change of pace is another technique 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



Ihat he could never carry it off," says 
1 veteran at the station. "He is soft- 
poken, quiet, diffident. But when the 
ed lights went on in front of him for 
he first time, a Jekyll-Hyde reaction 
ransformed him into a hard-sell 
lemon." 

Oddly, Burke won an audience — 
md a loyal one — for his highly 
■harged minutes. Here are some of 
he techniques that did it: 

• Reiteration. There's a comic 
juality, Burke discovered, to the 
epetition of points. It emphasizes 
lis own enthusiasm, which in turn 
idds to the conviction of the sell. 

• Trademarks. Burke found an ef- 
ective opener was appearing in as 
nany as four jackets over a suit. He 
itrips the jackets off, machine-gun 
ashion, selling as he goes. Trade- 
narks like this quickly built an audi- 
ence for Burke's commercials, in fact, 
,nade them conversation pieces. 

I • Supporting cast. Burke works 
"lis own dog, an impassive boxer 
(lamed Mike, into the act. He pur- 
posely contrasts his own enthusiasm 
.vith Mike's lack of interest in the 
rapid-paced goings-on. 

• Production simplicity. Burke 
lelivers his entire pitch in front of a 
rear projection of his store. A single 
;amera follows his actions, panning 
[0 Mike, or following Burke to a 
Nothing rack. 

' • Print carry-over. Burke spends 
about $9,000 a year in print, princi- 
pally for price listing during special 
sales. To make every dollar of his 
print advertising count, he displays a 
blowup of the ad prominently during 
iiis commercials (see photo above), 
then demonstrates the suits referred 
to, livening up the deadpan listing 
with his multiple- jacket antics, Mike, 
'anything at hand. 

• Copy points. Burke's selling is 
anchored to some basic copy points. 
One key point is a meeting of "Mr. 
Average" copy with "man of distinc- 
tion" appeal. Here's a sample (from 
>tand-by copy the station keeps on 
hand) : "Men from all over the state 
of Florida, men who grow with Flor- 
,ida, men who make the news, travel 
out of their way to patronize this fab- 

;ulous store. Whether they want to 




CONTRASTS HELP make spots entertaining. Here, Burke lets single camera pan up and 
down to contrast his enthusiasm with boxer's bored look, to get levity into price-listing pitch 



spend $40 or $125, they know Austin 
Burke tailors many of his own clothes 
. . . they buy direct and save 20 to 
40% . . . size 24 short to 54 long— 
11,000 garments for Mr. Average." 
Price is an important appeal. 

At first, Austin's unorthodox work 
habits didn't set too well with the 
station's staff, WTVJ directors recall. 
They didn't like having their talent 
arrive two minutes before air time. 
Then, after they'd talked him into 
rehearsal sessions, he disappeared 
one night — and was discovered snooz- 
ing in the far corner of the studio 
only seconds before he was due on. 

In memory of those days, the sta- 
tion still keeps Burke copy on the 
teleprompter for use by a stand-by 
staff announcer. But the emergency 
rarely occurs. Often Burke's off-the- 
cuff copy runs over his minute, and 
he fully expects to be cut off. Viewers 
are no longer surprised when it hap- 
pens. Somehow it seems to fit with 
the whole zany affair. 

Though Burke's work habits are 
more regular these days, he still likes 
the element of surprise. Only now it 
takes the form of schedule switches. 
The station's change-of-schedule file 
for Burke is about three inches thick. 
He enjoys changing pace, making 
quick schedule switches at the last 
minute whenever a spot opens up in 
a slot he likes. These switches, he 
finds, bring him new audiences for 
his customary stand in the late movie. 

Burke's normal scheduling of spots 



is based on psychological jjrinciples: 

Late evening, he says, is an ideal 
time for selling men's clothes in Mi- 
ami. "Because of the climate a man 
buys few suits in Florida, " he points 
out. "This makes purchase important. 
The late evening hours are quiet. 
There is plenty of time for discussion 
between man and wife over the suit 
I'm showing them."' 

In addition to his four minute 
stints per week in the late movie 
I which he frequently increases to six 
or eight), Burke does one minute 
spot per week around 6 p.m. on 
Wednesday. "About the time the man 
of the house is walking in the door in 
his present battered business suit." 

Burke puts about 85% of his S60,- 
000 yearly ad budget in tv — with the 
remainder going to newspapers for 
special events. He claims his store 
chalks up more sales than any com- 
petitor in the South Florida area. 
It's not at all convenient for Miami- 
ans to get to: they have to cross a 
causeway from the mainland and in 
many instances pay a toll. But for 
the last ten years. Burke has filled 
his store with customers from all over 
the South Florida market and has 
had to increase its size 11 times. 

Few men have prospered as rapidly 
as Austin Burke, the man who came 
to Miami 15 years ago. "with S'^OO 
and asthma." This year he will sell 
almost a million dollars worth of 
men's clothing. That, and the Flori- 
da sun. have cured his sniffles. ^ 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



31 



LOOK WHO LIKES WHAT MUSIC 



^ Seattle station and IBM Corp. poll 9,250 radio lis- 
teners on preference among five basic music categories 

^ Extreme rock 'n' roll ranks second in teen-age popu- 
larity, while million-sellers get big 75% over-all nod 



HERE'S THE VOTE 

12-16 years old LIKE 


BY AGES 

DON'T KNOW 


1 
DISLIKE 


1. CAT 


n 


83% 


11% 


6% 


2. CAT 


I 


74 


11 


16 


3. CAT 


V 


58 


22 


20 


4. CAT 


III 


37 


32 


32 


5. CAT 


IV 


16 


26 


58 


17-21 years old 1 


1. CAT 


V 


74% 


15% 


12% 


2. CAT 


II 


67 


16 


16 


3. CAT 


III 


64 


22 


14 


4. CAT 


I 


45 


15 


41 


5. CAT 


IV 


27 


30 


44 


22-40 years old I 


1. CAT 


V 


81% 


13% 


7% 


2. CAT 


III 


77 


16 


7 


3. CAT 


II 


53 


22 


26 


4. CAT 


IV 


35 


32 


33 


5. CAT 


I 


19 


15 


66 


40 and older 1 


1. CAT 


V 


75% 


16% 


10% 


2. CAT 


III 


63 


21 


16 


3. CAT 


II 


48 


25 


26 


4. CAT 


IV 


22 


31 


47 


5. CAT 


I 


19 


17 


63 


1 



I his week, results are in on wlj: 
is probably the most comprehensijt 
study of popular music tastes eV 
attempted. From 9,250 measural 
responses, radio station KING i 
Seattle and IBM Corporation (whi; 
jointly conducted the test) turned , 
attitudes about popular music A 
tined to cause considerable conti 
versy among stations and advertise 

Over two hours of broadcast tii 
were devoted to the survey, conduct 
in seven-minute segments five tiirj 
a day, seven days a week, for t\ 
weeks. While respondents were tab 
lated by age, sex and time of d 
they listened, only the first catego 
— age — appeared to have any si 
nificant bearing on musical tastes. 

Here's how the survey was co 
ducted: 100,000 questionnaire car 
were mailed to a random sample 
households in Seattle and 15 counti 
of Western Washington. One w© 
prior to the mailing (which was doi 
in two staggered dumps) a publiciti 
advertising drive created awarene 
of the mailing piece to insure ma? 
mum response. 

Every respondent could listen 
any one of a series of seven-minu 
survey broadcasts aired each day 
7:45 a.m., 9:45 a.m., 12:45 p.n 
4:45 p.m., or 7:45 p.m. Each of the 
70 survey broadcasts presented po 
tions of 10 record selections. Tl 
respondent's survey card allowed hi 
to rate each selection in five degre 
between "strong disliking" aij 
"strong liking." (After rating tlj 
tunes, the respondent mailed a pes 
age-paid card back to KING ar 
participated no further in any surve 
broadcasts.) 

The respondent did not know thi 
but the 10 tunes in each survey broai 
cast were divided into five categorii 
of music. It was these five categorii 
(shown on the opposite page) th. 
KING wanted to know more about 

Here, in a nutshell, is what tl 
survey turned up: 

• Preference by sex. Though thei 
were over twice as many women r 



32 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 195 



oondents as men (6.402 to 2,848), 
^rtually no difference in musical 
stes showed up. For example, 
ategory V music ( rated the most 
jpular) showed an almost identical 
'sponse: 77% female liking, 70% 
lale; 9'/, female disliking. 12% 
ale. Extreme rock 'n' roll showed 
' 31% female liking, 32% male; 
H% female disliking, 54/f male, 
ther categories showed similar close 
)rrelations. No time-of-day pattern 
ias evident either. 

I • Preference by age. This is where 
•le biggest like-dislike patterns oc- 
brred. While the survey called for 
Ve degrees of preference (strongly 
islike, like, dont know, like, strong- 

Uke), SPONSOR has consolidated 
le first and last two categories into 
■ke and dislike for purposes of sim- 
licity. Category V (million-sellers) 
Ued highest with all age groups, 
iccept 12-16 year-olds. Even with 
*is group extreme rock 'n' roll ranked 
'^cond to current hits of more sub- 
lued character I Category II). With 

II groups combined, million-sellers 
nd easily-recognizable standards 
rew the most favorable response, 
'urrent hits other than extreme rock 
V roll were a strong third. These 
iree categories showed verv little 
nfavorable reaction. 

• In the important 22-40 female 
roup, 63% disliked Category I (ex- 
eme rock'n'roll) music, 21% liked, 
^hile 16% didn't know. 
I • Highest single degree of prefer- 
nce was a strong liking for Category 
I music among 12-16 female re- 
^ondents at 7:45 p.m. The figure 
•as 62%. 

Methodology of the survey involved 
umerous safeguards: 
I • Basis of selection. Music for 
'le survey was compiled from four 
lurces: music popularity charts in 
illboard. Cash Box and Variety, as 
lell as a sales survey of 37 retail 
lores which KING itself conducts 
leekly in its coverage area. 
I • Method of compilation. Bill- 
iard, Cash Box and Variety listed 
mes were weighted 40 points for 
rst place, 39 points for second, 38 
loints for third and so on, with 
1 {Please turn to page 74) 





HERE ARE MUSIC CATEGORIES 



I. ROCK 'N' ROLL (Category I) had 
greatest acceptance in 12-16 age group: 
74% liked, 16% disliked. In 17-21 age 
group opinion was divided: 45% liked, 
41%. disliked. Over-all, 54% in all age 
groups showed dislike. {Only extreme 
rock 'n roll, here typified by Crash Crad- 
dock, was included) 

II. CURRENT HITS Other than Cate- 
gory I music {such as Johnny Mathis' 
"Small World") ranked third most popu- 
lar by over-all 58%, was most popular in 
12-16 age group {see chart opposite 
page). Less extreme rock 'ri roll hits 
were included. Selection was from "Top 
40" lists, dealer surveys 

III. FAMILIAR STANDARDS {Al- 
bum Music Type I) with easy-to-follow, 
easily-recognized melody lines {like Four 
Lads' "Breezin Along with the Breeze") 
polled the highest with 22-40 year olds: 
17% voted liking for this category, which 
also included McGuire Sisters' "Moon- 
glow", Boone's "Tenderly" 

IV. OFF-BEAT ARRANGEMENTS 

(Album Music Type 2) of familiar and 
unfamiliar tunes failed to make strong 
shotving with any age group. For all 
groups combined, 30% said they neither 
liked nor disliked category {here typified 
by Lumber t-Hendricks-Ross trio, newest 
off-beat sensation) 

V. GOLD RECORDSimillion - sellers 
excluding rock 'n roll) rated most popu- 
lar with all age groups. Over-all, 75% 
liked Category V, 65% Cat. Ill, 58% 
Cat. II, 32% Cat. I, 25% Cat. IV. Half 
were million-sellers prior to '53: others 
post '53. Example: "True Love" by Doris 
Day. {pictured here) 






PONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



33 



PART TWO OF A SERIES 



HOW TO PRE-SELL RADIO/TV 



^ Is your salesman or retailer as excited about that air 
media campaign as you are? Well, he'd better be 

^ Here are examples of what other advertisers do to 
make sure their radio /tv buys click on all fronts 



■ ^roblem: A manufacturer of shoe 
polishes has invested $1 million in a 
fall campaign consisting of spot tv 
saturation, network radio and a series 
of magazine ads. How can he enthuse 
retailers about his investment? 

Knomark, Inc., makers of Esquire 
Shoe Polishes, and its agency, Mogul 
Williams & Saylor, are solving it with 



an ingenious contest for retailers that 
is bound to make them conscious of 
the magnitude of the campaign. '"In 
order to stimulate and excite the 
trade — every retailer, wholesaler and 
their employees who handle Esquire. ' 
said Richard Lockman, senior vice 
president and supervisor on the ac- 
count at MW&S, "we began a contest 



this month that we believe to be th 
first of its kind for a consumer prod 
uct." Two-color, double-spread acl 
have been inserted in every top trad' 
journal covering hsquire's channels o 
distribution, askmg readers to "Cues' 
how many people will see the Fall V 
Esquire tv spots" that are part <> 
the "Powerhouse Ad Program lH 
Esquire, and win a free round tiij 
for two to Europe aboard the faiiu 
lous S.S. United States plus 99 othe 
prizes." 

The trade ads carry these clues t( 
help contestants: "27,012,213 peopl< 
will see the three full-color, fuU-jJage 
Esquire ads in Life . . . 9,420,18^ 
people will hear Esquire commercial; 






AL FRESCO SELL: This summer and fall, Crosley Broadcasting's farm outside Cincinnati was scene of many client sales meetings to pre-sell buyonWLV 



1 iliii 

l<liii>:iiii|i 







BANQUET SELL: That the way to a salesman's heart 
may be through his stomach is demonstrated at 
this dinner meeting and closed-circuit telecast to 
iromote the Kroger Co.'s buy of Ruth Lyon's "50-50 
Club" on WLW-TV. Meetings were in four cities 




xdTopVWiw Stamps Join 






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ii£Sfs YOUR PRIZE sne 

^1,000.00 

IN CASN 

GROCERS ONLY: Mammoth-size boat ticket 
serves as promotion for Best Foods Div. of 
Corn Products Co. sponsorship of "Riverboat" 
on NBC TV, and as contest blank for grocers 
and employees; winner gets 20-day trip along 
Mississippi on Delta Queen plus $1000 cash 




THE PRIZE: Aboard the famed Delta Queen, on which 
retailer winners of Best Foods "Riverboat " Sweep- 
stakes will cruise, are Captain Paul Underwood (in 
white), William R. Demery (I) and William Gill, Cin- 
cinnati managers for Best Foods, Corn Products 




over the giant Mutual Network radio 
campaign on 300 stations . . . week 
after week . . ." Then it asks them 
to guess the number of people who 
will see the tv spots, adds such clues 
as: three-month campaign began in 
September; potential audience is 75% 
of all tv homes in America; 47 key 
markets coast to coast are being used 
and total number of weekly viewers 
should be about double the audience 
of America's most popular tv show. 
Even if the dealer's working hours in 
the store prevent him from catching 
any of Esquire's tv announcements, 
this pre-sell contest emphasizes the 
I magnitude of the campaign that is 
I working to help him build sales. 

In today's complex and competitive 
' marketing picture some such internal 
I promotion of evei'y ad campaign has 
become a "must." Between the manu- 
facturer and the ultimate consumer is 
a chain of middlemen (starting with 
the manufacturer's own salesmen) 
whose efforts can spell the difference 



between mediocrity or smash success 
for the advertising drive. No adver- 
tiser can afford to leave these key 
people in the dark about his tv show 
or his radio flight, and the more he 
dramatizes it to them, the better his 
product will fare in shelf position and 
at the cash register. 

Take the case of a manufacturer of 
a non-packaged product such as auto 
safety glass. Since his item is hardly 
in the supermarket category, one 
might, at frrst glance, suppose his 
problems minimal. But the fact is, 
that the average local distributor of 
glass handles several brands. Prob- 
lem: to become his "pet product." 

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co-, is 
sponsoring the new Bourbon Street 
Beat series on ABC TV with one eye 
on stimulating consumer demand and 
another on improving dealer/distrib- 
utor relationships by giving them a 
mass audience tv show to tie in with 
locally. Bourbon Street Beat has only 
begun its run, and already in 112 of 



the 140 markets where it is shown, 
Libbey - Owens - Ford dealers have 
bought into the show. 

How was this accomplished? In 
July. Fuller i5i Smith & Ross j)roduced 
for its client a national closed-circuit 
telecast; it was in effect a sales meet- 
ing and pep rally for all the L-O-F 
glass dealers across the country. 1 hey 
were apprised of the Bourbon Street 
Beat buy. told what it would do for 
them, informed how they could tie in. 
This was only the beginning. 

Shortly thereafter, glass dealers re- 
ceived promotion kits on the show 
with detailed information on how 
they could make it work for them. 
They also received stacks of specially - 
recorded record albums of Bourbon 
Street Beat music to give away to 
their customers. 

So successful and thorough was the 
pre-sell. that when the show made its 
debut, L-O-F distributors from coast 
to coast held "opening night" parties. 

Closed-circuit telecasts and broad- 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



35 



casts are being used more and more 
for internal promotion to kick off ad 
campaigns. But "open-circuit" sales 
meetings! This season has seen them 
start. 

To kick off retail presentation of 
the new Chevrolets and Corvair, the 
Chevrolet Division of GM, through 
its agency, Campbell-Ewald, bought 
more than 80 CBS TV stations in 
major markets, assembled dealers and 
sales staffs at 7 a.m. on 2 October to 
witness a half-hour film program 
which featured, along with Chevy ex- 
ecutives, such other personalities as 
Chevy tv star Pat Boone and race 
drivers Mauri Rose, Joie Chitwood, 
Betty Skelton. Last year, the open 
circuit idea was a Chevy experiment 
in California, was so successful that 
this year it went national. It caters 
to a traditional car dealer custom of 
holding breakfast meetings on show- 
ing dates. 

A recent Sunday evening in New 
York saw a most unusual open-circuit 
sales meeting — unusual in that it pro- 
duced instantaneous sales. For less 



PROMOTIONAL GEMS: Keepsake Diamond Rings 
pulled out all the stops in pre-selling to jewel- 
ers its buy of Dick Clark's "American Band- 
stand" on ABC TV. Here are just a few of them 




than $10,000, Ideal Toy Corp. aired 
its meeting over New York's WOR- 
TV, attracted an ARB-estimated 350,- 
000 viewers. "But more important 
than total audience," said Mel Helit- 
zer. Ideal Toy's ad director, "was the 
high percentage of toy retailers and 
wholesalers in the New York metro- 
politan area that we reached." Four- 
teen prizes were awarded during the 
program (cameras, radios, tv sets, an 
automobile and a trip to Hawaii) ; 
12 of the 14 winners phoned in 
"which indicated," according to Helit- 
zer, "that 86% of the retailers in the 
metro area were watching." 

"The positive results were immedi- 
ate," said Abe Kent, vice president of 
merchandising for Ideal. "Hundreds 
of thousands of dollars worth of 
orders for the toys presented on the 
program were received within 48 
hours from the trade." 

Grey Advertising, the agency that 
produced the "open-circuit" sales 
meeting, reports that several other 
clients (Macy's and Greyhound) have 
expressed interest in trying this kind 



K«©I>S5*«» -^CW^M 



Merchandigest 







A Real "BEST- SELLER" Record. 



featuring Dick Clark 




FREE 



KAOio SPOTS 



of an "electronic" trade meeting soon. 

Even though a push may be pri- 
marily televison or radio, the print- 
ing press can be a power in internal 
pre-sell. Highpoint of this year's ad 
campaign for Keepsake Diamond 
Rings is its buy on ABC TV of Dick 
Clark's American Bandstand. Keep- 
sake has thus acquired a tv star who 
wields considerable influence on the 
age group most likely to buy Keep- 
sake diamonds, and it is not per- 
mitting its retail jewelers to forget 
it. The barrage of printed promotion 
began with a postcard to retail 
jewelers; one side, a photo of Dick 
Clark bearing the holograph, "To my 
Keepsake jeweler," and on the re- 
verse, a note calling attention to the 
tv buy. Then came a whole issue 
of Merchantdigest, Keepsake's house 
organ, devoted to Dick Clark. After 
that, a promotion kit that included 
radio and tv tie-in ideas, newspaper 
tie-ins, easel window cards and a little 
Dick Clark stand-up to fit into indi- 
vidual ring boxes. If just a part of 
this kit finds its way into jewelery 
windows, it will be hard to see the 
stores for Dick Clark. 

Bardahl, the Seattle-based manu- 
facturer of oil additive that has roared 
up the sales chart through tv cam- 
paigns, is adept at pre-sell. To serv- 
ice stations, it sends printed brochures 
listing tv schedules. The Bardahl 
salesmen were provided with similar 
lists plus mimeo sheets carrying later 
changes. 

Maremont Mufflers, another auto- 
motive advertiser, kicked off its tv 
campaign with a 30-minute color 
movie showing to its wholesalers and 
dealers. It contained samples of dem- 
onstration commercials along with 
pitches by Jack Paar and Dave Garro- 
way. 

This film was shown to the Mare- 
mont sales force in Chicago about a 
year ago. At the same time, the com- 
pany launched more internal promo- 
tion : an announcement letter to 
dealers and wholesalers signed by 
Garroway; a "spinner" curb sign for 
service stations. 

All this is the pre-sell that makes 
an air campaign click. Next week's 
installment will uncover more ideas 
from other advertisers. ^ 



36 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



SPONSOR 

special 
report 





RADIO AND TV 

1116 ITIBdIUmi There's a revolution going on in programing 
but many stations feel a feiv large clients ivho insist on old style 
formats are holding things back page 38 

I n6 mdrkSt. The biggest (LS. farm market survey is noiv in 
the works — the 1959 Agricultural Census. There'll be facts 
galore but many questions won't be answered page 40 

1/3S6 niStOryi Hess & Clark takes an unusual tack for a 
farm advertiser. It buys network radio but keeps its waste 
circulation to a minimum page 42 

Audience and market basics: Three pages packed 

solid with facts on the listening and vieiving habits of the farmer 
plus key market figures. - 



8th annual farm section 



page 43 

Projert Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 



The medium 



HERE'S EVIDENCE FARMERS LIKE URBAN MUSIC 

Homes reached per average quarter hour by WIBC, Indianapolis 



Time period 


Total 46 
Co. area 


IVIarion 
County 


IMuncie and 
Terre Haute 


Small Towns 
2500-50,000 


Rural— 2500 
and Under 


6-6:30 A.M. 
12:30-1 P.M. 


27,400 


6,300 


900 


10,800 


12,600 


6:30-10 A.M. 


33,800 


10,600 


1,100 


12,J00 


12,900 


10 A.M.-12 N. 


33,100 


9,800 


900 


11,800 


12,600 


1-2 P.M. 


33,800 


10,200 


1,100 


12,200 


12,600 


2-6 P.M. 


40.100 


12,300 


i:ooo 


14.700 


13,700 


7-9 P.M. 


31.700 


9,800 


800 


11.500 


12,300 


9 P.M.-12 Mid. 


26,000 


8,200 


800 


11,100 


10,200 



To find whether urban music beamed to its listening area was popular among rural and farm listeners, WIBC broke 
doivn Pulse area study into four sections shown above. Note rural audience is bigger than Marion (home) county's, 
particularly during farm listening periods (first line across). Figures cover Monday-through-Friday, March-April 1959 



Revolution coming in farm radio? 



^ It's going through a programing metamorphosis. 
Popular music, tight production may be staple fare 

^ But stations feel a few large clients who insist on 
old-style programs are holding back new air formats 



■ arm radio is, by its nature, an in- 
and-out medium, yet clients use it on 
a 52-week basis. 

Farm radio is ideal for farm prod- 
ucts, yet consumer products also 
take advantage of it. 

Farm radio is generally conserva- 
tive in its programing yet advertisers 
have been showing an interest in 
popular music for the farmer. 

The fact is you can't generalize 



about farm radio and how it's being 
used these days. The medium is 
going through a metamorphosis the 
end of which is not yet in sight. Some 
of the changes involve difficulties for 
stations who have been blown about 
by the new winds whistling across the 
farm landscape. The mechanization 
of farming and the consequent growth 
of the farm businessman, the chang- 
ing tastes of the farm audiences 



under the impact of mass commur 
cations, the replacement of farm lar 
by suburbia have all put pressure 
stations to adapt their farm pr 
graming to whatever the situatic' 
in their area calls for. Some st| 
tions have shown a sharp ability i 
meet the challenge head-on; othej 
have given up the ghost on farm pd 
graming, especially those who ha, 
tentatively dipped their feet in tlj 
medium in the hope of making a fe 
extra bucks without any solid plai 
ning or investment. 

The advertiser is just as keen o 
the medium as ever, though not a 
have looked with favor on the change 
taking place. 

As a matter of fact, says John I 
Dow, whose Dow Co. in Omaha hf 



38 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 195 



roster of eight farm clients, ■"inany 

iiion managers and program direc- 

is strongly feel that the insistence 

a few farm large advertisers and 

:.n(ies upon the old-style "talk" 

iiLirani is holding hack the develop- 

( lit of a new farm radio format. 

hev say — correctly — that as long 

5 the advertiser insists on old-style 

rograming, the station is powerless 

I modernize its farm format. 

Some radio people feel that new 
evelopments and techniques in farm 
roadcasting will come, not from 
)day's established farm stations, but 
cm other outlets — stations with a 
[rong signal, faced by intense com- 
lelition in the local metropolitan 
liusic-and-news field, who will turn 
ij farm programing as an additional 
Durce or revenue." 
Dow cited the case of an experi- 



ment now being tried by a midwest 
station. 

"A pioneer in its market with the 
music-and-news format," Dow ex- 
plained, "this station as been en- 
couraged by an excellent showing on 
area surveys to hire a farm director 
and attempt to develop a format for 
farm broadcasting which is consistent 
with the station's basic operation." 

He described the format as fol- 
lows: The period between 6 and 6:30 
a.m. has been divided into five- min- 
ute segments. Each segment includes 
two minutes of farm news, two min- 
utes of music and a one-minute com- 
merical. "It will be interesting to 
see, ' Dow said, "whether the station 
is able to sell this new format to farm 
advertisers." 

It will also be interesting to see 
whether "outsiders ' will take the ball 



away from established farm outlets. 
Meanwhile, there is evidence that the 
veteran farm stations are not standing 
still. 

One of the most revolutionary for- 
mats is one put into effect last fall 
by WKY, Oklahoma City. Manage- 
ment took its 6-7 a.m. segment and 
wove one-minute farm periods into a 
musical format. The type of material 
used remains the same as ever. What's 
different is that it's short and clear 
cut. For example, there's a minute 
for cattle prices, a minute for grain 
prices and a minute for swine prices. 
They're not mixed. Even the inter- 
views are a minute long. About 18 
farm minutes are used in all and the 
farmer-listener knows in advance 
when the subject of particular interest 
to him will be aired. 

{Please turn to page 49) 



THESE ARE SO 

Allied Chemical & Dye 
Allis-Chalmers 
American Cyan am id 
American Salt 


ME ACTIVE FARM 

Gland-O-Lac 
Gold Medal flour 
Granite City Steel 
Gulf 


RADIO/TV CLIENTS 

Murphy Feeds 
Myzon 


Nutrena Mills 


Bird & Son 


Hess & Clark 

Homelite chain saws 

Honeggers 

Hy-Line Poultry Farms 


Olin Mathieson 
Oliver Corp. 


Certo 

Chemagro Corp. 
Crow's Hybrid Corn 
Cudahy Packing 


Pfizer 

Progressive Farmer 


International Harvester 
hit' I Minerals & Chemicals 


Ralston Purina 


Davison Chemical 

Deere & Co. 

DCon 

DeKalb Agricultural Assn. 


J. I. Case 


Spencer Chemical 
Stauffer Chemical 
Sur Gel 
Swift & Co. 


Kendall Milk 
Key Dehydrators 
Keystone Mills 
Keystone Steel and Wire 


Esso 

Economic Laboratories 


Union Carbide 
L. S. Rubber 
U. S. Steel 


Fleischmann's yeast 
Ford trucks 
Funk Bros, seed 


Massey-Ferguson 

Merck 

McCuUoch Corp. 

Minneapolis-Moline 

Monsanto 

Moorman Manufacturing 


Virginia-Carolina Chemical 


Garst &• Thomas corn 
Geigy Agricultural 


Walnut Grove Products 
W illys Jeep 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



39 



The market 




FARM advertisers usually know their market well, though they find broadcast audience data sparse. Above, Everett Moore, right, ad manager o 
Frosty Morn meats, visits farmer Rob Wynn, left, with company plane. Accompanying them is John McDonald, farm director of WSM, Nashvillt 

NOW IN THE WORKS: BIGGEST 



^ The 1959 Census of Agriculture started this month. 
Preliminary data expected during 1960's first quarter 

^ While facts galore will come out of census, research 
is still needed on the buying psychology of the farmer 



I he biggest U. S. market study 
dealing with farming is now under- 
way. 

It is the 1959 Census of Agricul- 
ture, taken every five years and the 
basic source of farm data for the na- 
tion's marketers. After pre-testing 
last year, operations started early 
this month and by this time field 
work has been kicked off in 16 states. 
While the Census Bureau will release 
some preliminary reports during the 
first quarter of 1960, the windup of 
final reports on counties and states 
will not come until about the middle 
of 1961. And there's more to come. 
On top of this mass of information 
will be the farm data contained in 



the 1960 Censuses of Population and 
Housmg. 

Obviously, for the next couple of 
\ ears, market researchers will be pret- 
ty busy scanning the figures for signs 
of significant changes as well as for 
bread-and-butter tabulations. While 
Census Bureau sample studies have 
scanned the farm market annually, 
and even monthly, there are many 
subjects which are imperfectly mea- 
sured or not measured at all. 

Six basic kinds of information will 
be collected in this year's agricultural 
census: (1) The number of farms 
and other places on which agricul- 
tural operations are conducted. (2) 
The amount of land and the ways in 



which that land is used to provide 
food and fiber for the nation's con- 
stantly growing population. (3) The 
acres of all the crops and the number 
of livestock raised in this country. 

(4) The quantities produced and the 
sales of many different farm products. 

(5) The kind of machinery and 
equipment used on farms. (6) The 
number of people working on farmsj 
hours worked and rates of pay. 

Marketers have a good idea of the 
general direction in which farming is 
going. They know the farm popula- 
tion is declining and that fewer farm 
workers are turning out more food 
and fiber than ever. They know the 
size of the average farm is increasing-! 
They know the average farmer's in-i 
vestment in real estate, machinery 
and his ownership of household 
equipment has gone up. They know 
that the per capita purchasing powerj 
of the farm population, even with its 
growing sources of outside income,, 
has not made any strides during the 
past decade. Yet, they also know thati 



40 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 






i-assmm' '^'-isjwTTw 



ffMm.i.^mmi maB&mN ^mis. 



FARM GROSS INCOME STEADY BUT NET IS DOWN 



[In 


billions 

Full year 


of dollars) 
1 


1958 

II 


ill 


IV 


1959 

1 II 


Cash receipts from farm marketings 


$33.6 


$33.7 


$33.3 


$33.6 


$33.7 


$33.7 


$33.0 


ISon-money income & gov^t payments 


4.7 


4.6 


4.7 


4.8 


4.8 


4.5 


4.3 


Realized gross farm income 


38.3 


38.3 


38.0 


38.4 


38.5 


38.2 


37.3 


Farm production expenses 


25.2 


24.9 


25.2 


25.2 


25.3 


25.7 


25.8 


Farmers^ realized net income 


13.1 


13.4 


12.8 


13.2 


13.2 


12.5 


11.5 


!\et change in farm inventories 


1.1 


1.1 


1.1 


1.0 


.9 


.7 


.6 


Farmers' total net income 


14.2 


14.6 


13.9 


14.2 


14.1 


13.2 


12.1 












^^^^ 


^^^^ 


^"""^ 



U.S. Dept. (if Aki icultuie. seasnmilly adjusted income at annual rat ^ l>y (juarlers. 




U. S. FARM MARKET SURVEY 



the farmer's standard of living has 
.gone up. that he is buying more dif- 
Ificult products at the store and eating 
iless off his own farm than ever. 

This apparent contradiction be- 
tween the dollar level of what the 
farmer receives for the products he 
raises and what he is able to acquire 
for his farm operations and his own 
consumption is partly explained by 
the rising farm debt. Outstanding 
mortgages have about doubled since 
the end of the war, now stand at more 
that $10 billion. It is also explained 
by two periods of exceptionally good 
business, one during the late 40's and 
one during the Korean War. 

The farmer enjoyed a relatively 
good year in 1958 — a recession year 
for urbanites, oddly enough. How- 
ever, during the first nine months of 
19.59 his net income was down about 
12 /( , according to preliminary esti- 
mates. While farm gross remains at 
the 1958 level, increased production 
expenses and decreased government 
payments cut into profits. 

It is clear to most farm observers 



that the average farmer won't ap- 
proach his opposite number in the 
cities in terms of cash income until 
the marginal producers call it quits. 
In the meantime, the centralizing 



tend 



encies commg out 



of bigger 



farms and such developments as con- 
tract farming and absentee ownership 
are resulting in a shift of focus for 
marketers. The question is begin- 
ning to be asked: To what extent is 
the farm operator making buying de- 
cisions, as opposed to, for example, 
his absentee landlord? The fact is that 
marketers know very little about the 
farmer's buying habits and motives 
behind them. This and more data on 
farm broadcast audiences remain two 
research frontiers which marketers 
must tackle before they can really 
say they know the basic facts about 
farm advertising. 

With a few exceptions, the basic 
rating data on when farmers listen, 
what stations they listen to. and how 
many listen during specific periods is 
just not available. Researching a 
farm home is more expensive than re- 



searching an urban home and, more- 
over, the more numerous urban audi- 
ences are what nearly all stations are 
primarily interested in, anyway. How- 
ever, until the audience facts are 
gathered, farm radio and tv will labor 
under a handicap. 

That the farm market is worth 
cultivating by broadcasters is a fact 
beyond dispute. Aside from the con- 
sumer potential represented by about 
20 million persons, there is the huge 
investment annually made bv farmers 
to operate their farms. Including 
cash wages, this hits a level well over 
the $20 billion mark. 

In its promotion presentation this 
year, the National Association of 
Television & Radio Farm Directors 
pointed out that ( 1 1 farmers are the 
oil industry's biggest customer. 1 2^ 
farmers use 60' r as much steel as the 
auto industry in a good year, (3) 
farmers buy more rubber than the 
Big Three put on their cars. 

Despite the decline in the number 
of farmers, the industrial side of 
farming is growing. ^ 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



41 



Case history 

No waste audience for this client 



^ Hess & Clark takes unusual tack in buying network 
radio to reach farmers. It does better than you think 

^ Red Foley program has a 50% farm audience and 
the rest are targets for drive pushing egg consumption 



W, 



aste circulation is a concern of 
every advertiser. But very often it is 
wasted only because the advertiser 
doesn't know what to do with it. 

Hess & Clark, makers of feed 
medication and animal health prod- 
ucts, provides a case of one advertiser 
who knows how to turn what others 
might consider Avaste into a useful 
promotional effort. 

The company sponsors the Red 
Foley Show on NBC Radio every Sat- 
urday. Now. as everyone knows, the 
farm advertiser who uses network 
advertising is a rare bird (though 
Hess & Clark is not unique since its 
show is adjacent to the National Farm 
& Home Hour, which has been an 
Allis-Chalmers \ehJcL> fjr some 



time). As everyone also knows, the 
reason why network farm clients are 
rare is that a national advertising 
medium like network radio is likely 
to gather a pretty wide variety of 
listeners. 

Let it be said at the outset that the 
Red Foley Shoiv is not just any net- 
work radio show. Foley is popular 
among rural folk and a high percent- 
age of farmers are attracted to the 
show in the first place. Hess & Clark 
estimates that about half the audience 
are farmers — which is not bad. 

Second, being adjacent to the long- 
running National Farm & Home 
Hour does no harm because, in ad- 
dition to being popular with farmers, 
it attracts agricultural extension peo- 



COUNTRY music star Red Foley, an Important merchandisable benefit oi Hess & Clark's NBC 
radio buy, signs autographs for admirers at fair, where he promotes poultry drug to farmers 




pie and farm business executives. 

Third, Foley provides a plus in 
being a merchandisable personality 
who is nationally known. And that's 
something you don't usually get on a 
local station. 

Fourth, network radio is an un- 
beatable buy these days. You can 
swim in waste circulation and still 
have low cost-per-1,000 prospects. 

All these reasons in themselves are 
enough to justify the buy. But the 
list isn't finished. Hess & Clark uses 
the show to advertise nf-180, a drug 
used in the prevention and treatment 
of disease among poultry and swine, 
and to improve egg production among 
chickens. The product is mixed into 
feed by feed manufacturers, which 
are Hess & Clark's immediate cus- 
tomers, so anyone who wants to make 
hay with waste circulation arguments 
can certainly do so here — except that 
advertisers of "ingredient" products 
are in respectable numbers and no- 
body has ever called U.S. Steel or 
Du Pont stupid for their advertising. 

In addition to selling nf-180 on the 
Red Foley Show, Hess & Clark has a 
promotion which it calls "the golden 
goodness of eggs" and, take it from 
the industry, this is no off-the-cuff, 
throwaway promotion. So far as the 
show itself is concerned, the promo- 
tion does three things. It plugs the 
high nutritional value of eggs to the 
public, thereby raising national health 
standards. This only vaguely affects 
Hess & Clark's profits but it's nice to 
be able to mix service and selling. 
The egg commercials also do their bit 
in boosting the economy of the poul- 
try industry and, finally, they create 
a favorable image for Hess & Clark s 
nf-180 within the poultry trade. 

So much for the whys and where- 
fores of this apparently odd network 
buy which, by this time, shouldn't 
look odd at all. What Hess & Clark 
does outside of network radio with 
"the golden goodness of eggs" pro- 
motion makes a story in itself — and 
here it is. 

It all started last July at the Amer- 
ican Poultry Congress and Exposi- 
{Please turn to page 54) 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



FARM AUDIENCE BASICS 



illlllllliilllllllllllllliillilllllllllllllllilllilllllllllliillillllllllliillllllllllll^^ 

FARM AND RURAL HOMES MORE SELECTIVE THAN URBAN IN RADIO TUNING 

Number of stations tuned weekly per average home by county size 

RADIO 





Total U.S. 


Over 100,000 25-100,000 
homes homes 


10-25,000 
homes 


Less than 10,000 
homes 


Daytime 


2.5 stns. 


2.1 stns. 2.2 stns. 


2.4 stns. 


2.6 stns. 


IS ig lit time 


1.4 


1.1 1.2 


1.2 


1.5 


TELEVISION 


Daytime 


2.4 


2.6 2.4 


2.5 


2.4 


Nighttime 


2.7 


3.5 3.1 


2.9 


2.6 






Source: A. C. Nielsen, radio figures from N'CS No. 2, spring lOjC; tv figures Hum NCS N,>. 3. s})ring lUJS. 
Ililllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllim 

Ji:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiilliiiiliiiiiiiiiliiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

INHOME LISTENING IN FARM, RURAL HOMES SLIGHTLY LESS THAN URBAN 

Average daily hours tuning per home by county size and by seasons 

RADIO 

Total U.S. "A" counties "B" counties "C" counties "D" counties 



Jan..Feb. 1959 


1.89 hrs. 


1.97 hrs. 1.90 hrs. 


1.80 hrs. 


1.76 hrs. 


May- J line 1959 


1.91 


2.17 1.88 


1.72 


1.60 


TELEVISION 


Jan. -Feb. 1959 


5.89 


5.88 5.86 


6.00 


5.83 


May- June 1959 


4.35 


4.49 4.43 


4.46 


3.70 






Source: A. C. Nielsen, radio figuies from N'RT, tv figures from NTI. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 

|llilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII»^ 

I INDIANA FARM RADIO USTENING UP, TV VIEWING DOWN 

Average daily listening per Indiana farmer Average weekly hours tv viewing 



1955 



1958 



increase 



46 min. 



57 min. 



23% 



Source: From annual studies by Indiana Farm Bureau 
Cooperative Assn. 



1955 



1958 



change 



Men 


15.5 hrs. 


13.9 hrs. 


—10.3 


W omen 


17.8 


17.0 


4.5 


Children 


19.5 


16.3 


—16.4 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^^^^^ 

ore basics on pages 46, 4S 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



43 



Now you can have 
reliable audience data on 




all TV viewirr 












[^f^ 
-*/> 



{m^m 







m^^ 



41^' 



m 





m 





Ixpanded N STATIONlN^ gives you tlie facts you need 

t» invest broadcast dollars wisely 



IN 146 MARKET AREAS 



(231 cities) 



imeet the demand for truly comprehensive tv audience measurements at local levels in all parts of the country, the number 
iMielsen Station Index market areas has been substantially increased . , . from 32 in '58 to 146 by '60. Every ai-ea in the U.S. 
jh two or more tv transmitters will be reported ... 97 percent of all tv viewing. Similar information is available for radio in 
|major areas which account for the great majority of U. S. radio listening. 

Never before has so much reliable information 

about local audiences been available from one source : 



Number of homes reached ... by station 

NSI tells you (for each of the 146 Metro or Central Areas) the 
number of tv homes — and the percent reached by each station 
during any specific time period. In addition, you a^e given the 
total inimber of homes reached by each station, regardless of 
where the homes are located ... in other words, the total reach 
in terms of families delivered. 



Supplements national tv and 
radio ratings 

NSI is completely compatible with Nielsen Radio & Television 
Indexes (NRI & NTI) which measure and report national net- 
work audiences. NSI supplies parallel information for each indi- 
vidual station in the network. Knowledge of this kind quickly 
locates areas of strength and of weakness in national coverage 
. . . and provides basic information for interpretation or cor- 
rective measures. 



Composition of audience 
for each 15-minute period 

NSI tells you, for each station for each quarter-hour from 6 a.m. 
to midnight, seven days a week, the number of viewers per 
home and their distribution by men, women, teenagers and 
children ... to show you whether your messages are reaching 
your best customers. 



Reports based on 4 or 8 vreek average 

NSI measures radio and tv time period audiences over a broad 
time span (4 or 8 weeks) so as to report the average condition . . . 
this avoids misleading results caused by changes in program- 
ming, special promotions and other untypical influences. 

Each market is reported season to season — from 2 to 12 times 
a year depending upon the size and importance of the area. 
Right now NSI issues over 720 different seasonal market reports 
a year - by next spring 800 ! 



NSI and "U.S. Census Metro -Areas 
are identical 

NSI Metro Market Areas are those determined by the U.S. 
Census and used by most marketing research organizations. For 
smaller market areas, NSI has created "Central Areas" based on 
local tv conditions. Information reported by NSI dovetails 
neatly with company and agency marketing plans and analyses. 



Backed by 20 years 

of tested audience measurement 

The wide acceptance of Nielsen radio and television ratings and 
measurements . . . both national and local ... is founded on 
sound research methodology. Basic data are sound . . . free of 
personal bias, lapse of memory, ego-saving reporting and similar 
human foibles. Data processing is scientific. Special electronic 
equipment, much of it developed by Nielsen, reduces millions 
of pieces of information to usable and reliable measurements 
and ratings. 

The men responsible for the development and operation of 
NSI include experienced radio and television executives with 
years of service in major advertising agencies, networks, stations 
and corporations. They have used Nielsen services them.selves 
and know what time-buyers, marketing directors, advertisers 
and others want and expect from a measurement service. 



But this is only part of the NSI story- 
There is a lot more to NSI than reported here. If you 
will let us know when it would be convenient we will 
tell you the whole story and show you how NSI is used 
to make television and radio dollars work harder. 

T7''T3 Tjl "XT* to all responsible for buying 

•^ Xl<X-J A-J df selling radio and tv lime. 

Handy 160-page book of basic facts about the 146 NSI market 

areas. Individual maps show each Metro or Central Area and 

surrounding counties. Data include: Number of homes in Metro 

Area, tv homes, radio homes, major stations, etc. 

Please give your name, company, position and busi- 
ness address when requesting this valuable book. 




Nielsen Station Index 

a service of A. C. Nielsen Company 

2lOl Howard Street, Chicago 45, Illinois • HOIIycourt 5-4400 



i 



A 



en Slolion inde 



CALL . . . WIRE . . . OR WRITE TODAY 
FOR ALL THE FACTS 

CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS 
360 N Michigan Ave . FRanklin 2-3810 

NEW YORK 22. NEW YORK 
Sys Lexcngton Ave.. MUrray Hill 8-1020 

MENLO PARK. CALIFORNIA 
70 Willow Road, DAvenport 5-0021 

NRI (Nielsen Rodio Index) 



Farm audience basics (Continued) 

SOiVIE FACTS & FIGURES ABOUT THE FARM FAMILY & RADU 



piiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

■ GENERAL LISTENING TOTALS ■ 



g Families listening in a iieek: 



95.5%, 



Families listening 4 or more days: 83«3%i 



llllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllilil 
TOTAL HOURS WEEKLY LISTENING 



m 


12-STATE AVERAGE 


26 HOURS 40 MINUTES 


1 


I\ortheast Average 


22 hours 25 minutes 


1 


Far West Average 


26 hours 54 minutes 


1 


Southern Average 


24 hours 


~ 


Midwest Average 


29 hours 13 minutes 



:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiio^ aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy^ 



miiiiiiiiiii 



LOCATIONS OF WEEKDAY FARM RADIO LISTENING 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH 



Areas 



Kitchen 



Living room Bedroom 



Dining room 



Den, 
playroom 



Barn 



Automobile 



12-State 


51.7% 


19.8% 


17.4% 


4.9% 


2.1% 


5.8% 


21.7% 


TSortheast 


55.5 


19.4 


11.0 


7.7 


.6 


4.5 


18.7 


Far West 


49.7 . 


21.7 


18.6 


3.8 


2.1 


5.1 


23.6 


South 


43.3 


22.5 


19.3 


3.8 


2.1 


2.6 


20.6 


Midwest 


61.7 


15.1 


15.9 


6.4 


2.5 


10.1 


21.9 



.rillllllilllllllllllllilililllliilllllllllillliillllllllilllliillliillllillliillliillllillillllllilll!^ 

fllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllilllllillllllilllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllP^ 

■ PERCENT FARM FAMILIES LISTENING BY DAY-PARTS 





Morning 


Afternoon 


Evening 


ALL DAY 


Weekday 


63.37o 


43.7% 


33.9% 


80.8% 


Week-end day 


58.5 


42.7 


36.0 


78.2 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

RADIO SET OWNERSHIP BY FARM FAMILIES 



AVERAGE NUMBER 
OF SETS OWNED 



% OWNING 2 
OR MORE SETS 



% OWNING 3 
OR MORE SETS 



% OWNING 4 
OR MORE SETS 



2.6 



79.3 



45.6 



21.5 



iiiiiiuiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii liiiiiiiiiii II iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

ALL DATA ABOVE comes from Radio Advertising Bureau, is based on Pulse survey of farm families in 12 states during July, November and Decembf 
1957. Chart on location of listening shows percent of farm families which listen during weekdays in various spots. Chart on listening by day-par 
shows percent which listen during time indicated. States included: N. Y., Colo., Calif., Wash., Fla., Miss., N. C, Tex., III., la., Kans., Wis. 



46 



SPONSOR • 



24 OCTOBER 19J 





of the total 

automotive gross sales 

are made in the 

KEYSTONE COVERAGE AREA! 



• Eighteen and one half BILLIONS of DOLLARS in 
automobiles and accessories are purchased in areas cov- 
ered by Keystone stations. 

We'll be happy to send you our just completed 
KEYSTONE AUTOMOTIVE STUDY and our latest 
STATION LIST. Write to our nearest office: 



CHICAGO NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

111 W.Washington St. 527 Madison Ave. 3142 Wilshire Blvd. 57 Post St. 

STate 2-8900 ELdorado 5-3720 DUnkirk 3-2910 SUtter 1-7440 

DETROIT Penobscot Building 



• TAKE YOUR CHOICE. A handful of stations or the network ... a minute or a full hour-it's 
up to you. your needs. 

• MORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR. No ptemium cost for individualized programming. Network 
coverage for less than some "spot" costs. 

• ONE ORDER DOES THE JOB. All bookkeeping and details are done by Keystone, yet the best 
lime and place are chosen lor you 




SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



47 



FARM MARKET BASICS 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 

I FARMER'S 'LEVEL OF LIVING' VARIES BY AGE AND EDUCATION 



BY EDUCATION 



% farm homes with 



Total 



Less than 
9 grades 



9-12 



Over 12 



ELECTRICITY 


94% 


92% 


98% 


100% 


TELEPHOISE 


52 


40 


66 


75 


AUTO 


74 


66 


86 


96 


MECHAJSICAL 
REFRIGERATION 


90 


88 


97 


98 


HOME FREEZER 


39 


31 


50 


57 


POWER WASHER 


84 


81 


90 


91 


TV 


53 


46 


63 


76 


RUNNING WATER 


64 


52 


81 


90 


FLUSH TOILET 


50 


38 


67 


84 





BY AGE OF FARMER 




Under 25 


25-44 


44-64 


65 & over 


96% 


96% 


95% 


89% 


44 


52 


51 


47 


65 


85 


75 


58 


93 


93 


90 


85 


33 


44 


40 


26 


72 


89 


85 


73 


42 


61 


53 


40 


55 


67 


64 


57 


40 


51 


51 


45 



= Source: U. S. Bept. of Agriculture, 1956. Percent ownership by farm operator families of home facilities and appliances. 

illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 



iiiii 



pllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilll^ 

I HOW FARM AISD NON-FARM FAMILIES 

I DIVIDE THEIR SPENDING 

= Category 

I FOOD, BEVERAGES 

I HOUSING 

I CLOTHING 

I TRANSPORTATION 

I MEDICAL CARE 

I RECREATION 



iliiiiiil 



II 

ONE FARM WORKER FEEDS 23 OTHER 
AMERICANS 



Farm 

% 


Non-Farm 

% 


31 


31 


21 


28 


17 


12 


14 


14 


9 


5 


6 


6 



= Year 



OTHER 



Persons supported 
per farm worker 


Total farm 

employment 

(millions) 


Total U.S. 
population 
(millions) 


4.12 


2.4 


9.6 


4.18 


5.7 


23.3 


5.57 


10.1 


50.3 


7.07 


13.6 


92.4 


9.75 


12.5 


123.1 


10.69 


11.0 


132.1 


15.49 


9.3 


151.7 


19.76 


8.2 


165.3 


23.55 


7.6 


170.5 



Source; Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»^ 



1820 
1850 
1880 
1910 
1930 
1940 
1950 
1955 
1957 

Source: U. S. Dept. of Agriculture 

III 



1958 



lilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllP^ 

THE FARM IS BECOMING CONTINUALLY MORE MECHANIZED I 



Year 


Tractors 


Trucks 


Autos 


Grain 
combines 


Corn 
pickers 


Milking 
machines 


Pickup 
balers 


Forage 
Harvesters 


1910 


1 





50 


1 




12 




.... 


1920 


246 


139 


2,146 


4 


10 


55 






1930 


920 


900 


4,135 


61 


50 


100 






1940 


1,545 


1,047 


4,144 


190 


110 


175 






1950 


3,394 


2,207 


4,199 


714 


456 


636 


196 


81 


1955 


4,345 


2,701 


4,258 


980 


688 


712 


448 


202 



4.685 



3,000 



4,260 



1,040 



745 



725 



590 



255 I 

g Source: U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. Motor vehicles and specified macliines on farms. All figures are In thousands. Tractors exclude steam and garden types. g 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^^ 



48 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959! 



[the medium 

{Continued from page 39) 

Minutes for advertisers are sold 
in groups of three or six with specific 
positions available. While the sta- 
tion was a little concerned about ad- 
vertiser reaction, Morris Kellner, 
head of Katz Agency radio sales, 
reports its concern turned out to be 
unwarranted. The regular advertisers 
remained and the station even picked 
ii|) a little extra business. 

Tile music worked into the morning 
hour is described as popular with a 
"country" flavor. It is not country 
music in the often-understood sense 
of that term, however. It could better 
be described as "tunes of yesteryear," 
which would cover popular hits of 
the last decade or two. The impor- 
tant thing is that the music is palat- 
able to both urban and rural tastes — 
a solution not hard to come by these 
days with the farmer developing a 
pronounced urbanized attitude toward 
his entertainment. 

One of the most significant bits of 
evidence on the changing nature of 
the farmer's musical tastes was 
turned up by WIBC. Indianapolis. 
The station had been doing area 
Pulse studies for a number of years. 
Since these studies generally give area 
totals, stations cannot always tell how 
specific areas compare in audience 
size. Because the station had added 
a farm director and for other reasons, 
WIBC management this year had its 
area study broken down. 

The breakdown was originally in- 
tended for internal use. its purpose 
to see whether the urban music 
beamed to the station's 46-county 
area was popular in small towns, and 
among rural and farm people. Re- 
cause of the results, WIBC gleefully 
released the figures. 

These showed indisputable proof 
that rural families liked what they 
heard on WIBC. During the tradi- 
tional farm periods I 6-6:30 a.m. and 
12:30-1 p.m.) the rural audience was 
about twice that in the station's home 
county. But even in the six other 
time blocks covering the station's 
broadcast day, there were more rural 
homes tuning into WIBC than in the 
home county. 

The study evoked this comment 
from Welles Barnett of the John 
Blair Co.: "Now, I can say with 
absolute assurance that people on 
farms go for the same music as peo- 
ple in the cities." 




Ifs 

the 

Truth! 



THESE MIDDLE GEORGIA FARMERS 
HAVE MDIVEY ID SPE^D IVOW! 

1958 Farm ineotne . . . $200,000,000 

AND THEY'RE SPEIVDmG IT! 



1958 RETAIL SALES g^ UP SVl^O 
FIRST HALF, 1959, SALES UP 11% 



GET YDLH SHARE DP THIS 

MULTI-MILLIDM DDLLAR FARM 

MARKET 

BUY THE STATION CITED 
FOR SERVICE TO AGRICULTURE! 



"SEE YOl/R AVERY 
KIVODEL MAIS TODAY" 

5D,D0D WATTS 

EDS 

MAEDIV, GEORGIA 




10,000 mOHTTlME 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 19.59 



49 



Distingu ished 
Service Award 




to 
''Bob'' Bailey 

Richland County Farm Agent 

The distinguished service award 
of the National Association of 
County Agents was given to Mr. 
Robert W. "Bob" Bailey for the 
outstanding job he has done in 
helping Richland County farmers 
operate their farms on a profit 
making basis. 

Congratulations to Mr. Bailey 
on a richly deserved honor. We 
are proud that he has been giv- 
ing WIS listeners advice and in- 
formation for 14 years. 

If you want to sell the farm 
audience, get the full story on 
Bob Bailey and other top farm 
specialists exclusive on WIS. 
Call your PCW Colonel. 



COLUMBIA, S.C. 

NBC • 560 KC • 5000 WATTS 



C. Richard Shafto, Exec. Vice President 
W. Frank Harden, Managing Director 



An intriguing part of this study 
were the answers to a question put 
to a sub-sample of 130 farm homes 
regarding their program likes and 
dislikes. While 27% of the families 
said they preferred weathercasts and 
25% said they liked market reports, 
only 2.3% preferred "farm pro- 
grams." Exactly what was meant by 
this it is hard to say but it is clear 
that weather and market reports were 
not included. It is likely that WIBC's 
farm audience was talking about 
farm interviews and "talk" shows. 

The answers fit in nicely with the 
more progressive theories about the 
kind of programing that farmers will 
go for. Briefly, the "progressives" 
call for less talk and more service, 
tighter production, sharp and punchy 
farm segment and pop music. The 
WIBC study found 48% of its re- 
spondents preferring the pop variety, 
but here again the term is subject to 
interpretation. There is a school of 
thought that feels farm audiences 
will accept the so-called "Top 40" 
format principally because, as one 
broadcaster put it, "after all, young 
farm families are not far away from 
their teens." 

There are many reservations about 
a best-seller music format, however. 
One adman sees the "Top 40" tide 
receding. He is Charles "Chuck" 
Forbes, farm specialist in Gardner 
Advertising's tv/radio production de- 
partment. Forbes said: 

"We're confident that within the 
coming months advertisers will see a 
change from the "Top 40" rock-and- 
roll routine toward a streamlined 
version of block programing as we 
knew it in the 40's. There will be 
music and news but also variety and 
a change in pace which will permit 
farm radio to come back into its own 
in proper balance within the frame- 
work of good station programing. 
This trend is already noticeable in 
the South and there's every reason 
to believe it will soon become a fac- 
tor with stations throughout the coun- 
try." 

Another negative comment about 
"Top 40" comes from J. Harry 
Varner, advertising manager of the 
Armour Agricultural Chemical Co. 
He says: 

"I should think that the "Top 40" 
radio formula could have the same 
impact on farm teen-agers as it does 
on teen-agers in the city. However, 
I am highly doubtful that it is an 



effective means of reaching the 
farmer himself by a manufacturer oi 
farin production items, such as feed 
and fertilizer." 

All the foregoing comments about 
farm programing should not be in- 
terpreted to mean that conventional 
programing is not doing a job or thai 
it won't be able to do a job in the 
future. Nothing can be farther from 
the truth. Most farm programing is 
(by definition) conventional anc 
many farm programs together witPj 
the farm directors who run them arf 
doing effective work for farm adver, 
tisers. And they are continuing tc 
attract top audiences. 

One station which comes under th( 
heading of conventional farm pro 
graming outlets is WHO, Des Moines! 
The station had sponsored the well 
known Whan studies on Iowa's t\ 
and radio audience for years but thii 
year had Pulse undertake a 93-count) 
area study. A separate farm honi( 
breakout covering farm listenin{ 
times showed the station commonly 
garnered ratings of 10 to 15. 

Still, change 15 in the wind and no 
body can be immune from its effects 
particularly the advertiser. For som( 
years now, the trend has been awai 
from sponsoring programs to buyinj 
announcements. During the last yea 
this trend continued. 

One of the benefits of flexible buy 
ing via announcements is illustratec 
by the new buying pattern of Ameri 
can Salt Corp. of Kansas City, manu 
facturers of livestock salt and minera 
mixtures. American Salt's radi( 
schedule, via the Dow Co., formerl; 
consisted of fixed time spots on fou 
radio stations in four different state 
on a 52-weeks-per-year basis. B; 
changing to weekly packages on ai 
in-and-out schedule (about one weel 
out of every month), American Sa^ 
was able to increase its coverage ti 
22 stations without increasing it 
dollar expenditures. 

Flexibility has always been thi 
big plus of farm radio, whether thi 
advertiser bought programs or an 
nouncements. In addition to spo 
radio's general flexibility, there's thi 
fact that farm markets differ S( 
greatly and seasonal patterns are S( 
pronounced. 

Listen to these questions put b^' 
Sander Allen, Inc., agency for Velsicoi 
Chemical Corp., which makes Heptai 
chlor, an ingredient used in branded 
agricultural insecticides: "How del 



50 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1955 




! I 



OF MILK 

andKoney 

WBAY ch. 2 

GREEN BAY 



«^«^ ^^^■''■ 



* s* *V .-ss "^^ %*g 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



51 



THAT HELLUVA SALESMAN 

noYD 

SELLS 
m STEEL 




Audience 
identification 

of this 

trademark 

jumped 

41.8% 

after exposure 
on 

Kel-O-Land's 
TV Hookup! 

(as reported in Television Magazine) 

THE FERTILE TEST MARKET 
OF MAJOR INDUSTRIES 



KELOLAND HOOKUP CBS ABC NBC 



KElOtv 



KDLO » 



SIOUX FALLS; and boosters 



Aberdeen-HuronWatertown 



PierreValentineChamberlaJn 



General Offices: Sioux Foils, S.D. 

JOE FLOYD, Prasideni 

Evans Nord, Gen. Mgr. 

Larry Bentson, Vice-Pres. 

REPRESENTED BY H-R 

In Minneapolis by Wayne Evons & Assoc. 



you plan an advertising program if 
you have a seasonal product put don't 
know when the season will occur? 
How do you advertise a dozen dif- 
ferent product uses in 20 different 
areas that range in size from several 
states to one county? How do you 
reach an audience that's hard at work 
during the best selling season? How 
do you handle special programs that 
go from sales department to conclu- 
sion in two or three weeks? For 
Velsicol Chemical Corp., the answer 
to all these questions is radio." 

Further explanation comes from 
Velsicol's ad manager, L. E. Carls, 
who says, "We advertise Heptachlor 
to back up customers who use it in 
brand name insecticides and to help 
local dealers. Naturally, we want to 
advertise it strongly in areas that 
have a heavy insect infestation. Be- 
cause we don't always know where 
and when an outbreak will occur, we 
often rely on radio's fast action." 

Carls says it's not unusual for the 
agency to phone a script to several 
stations in one afternoon so that a 
campaign can be started the following 
morning. During the course of a 
year, Velsicol uses as many as 1,000 
spots in selected farm areas. 

Heptachlor is best used during or 
just prior to planting. This is a 
farmer's busy time and he is, con- 
sequently, hard to reach. "Radio, 
though," says the agency, "follows 
the farmer wherever he goes." 

Though Velsicol has no set sched- 
ules, it has a "loyal working ar- 
rangement" with about 50 stations 
throughout the country, using the 
same stations whenever it comes back 
into an area that has been covered 
in previous years. 

John J. Mojonniers of Sander Allen 
points out that Velsicol's farni ad- 
vertising consists of many regional 
programs. A typical example is its 
Midwest Soil Insect Program for 
Heptachlor. The 1960 program uses 
13 radio stations and two tv stations 
to cover all of Iowa and parts of 
Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. 

One minute live announcements 
are used and the farm director gets 
background information on the prod- 
uct to assure favorable mentions. 
"Almost all of these spots are run 
near news and weather broadcasts or 
farm price reports or other pro- 
graming that is of special interest to 
farmers." explains Mojonniers. "Oc- 
casionallv we are able to time the an- 



nouncements to precede or follow a 
program sponsored by one of the 
companies that sells trade name 
Heptachlor formulations and this 
makes a very effective tie-in." 

One of the reasons farm broad- 
casting's flexibility is so important 
is that farm magazines don't have it. 
Armour's Varner says, "We use farm 
radio in areas where we need inten- 
sive coverage to complement the 
broad coverage given us by farm 
magazines; and in situations where 
great geographic flexibility is de- 
sired." 

Northrup, King, seed firm, uses, 
in a manner of speaking, the flexi- 
bility of farm radio to strengthen its 
own farm radio schedule. K. H. 
Erickson, marketing-advertising di- 
rector, reports, "We are using farm 
broadcasting as a year round um- 
brella of product coverage in areas 
where adequate stations, programing 
and personnel cover our sales areas. In 
others, we are doing supplementary 
spot programs during peak sales 
periods of special products." 

Flexibility implies, among other 
things, a variety of choices. Adver- 
tisers are divided on the subject of 
whether there are enough good farm 
programs around but the quarrel 
centers basically around the inter- 
pretation of the word "good." 

The dispute also suggests that 
farm broadcasting could attract more 
money with more or improved pro- 
graming. Here's what Edwin H. 
Ginn, manager of agricultural adver- 
tising for Hercules Powder Co., has 
to say: 

"In our experience, farm programs 
of value vary greatly from area to 
area. In some locations we have our 
choice of several good radio or tv 
programs. In other locations we have 
no choice at all. Generally speaking, 
there are too few bona fide farm pro- 
grams. There is no doubt we would 
budget more money for radio or tv if 
satisfactory programs were avail- 
able." 

Adman Dow, six of whose eight 
farm clients use farm radio and 40% 
of whose billings goes into farm 
radio, finds the availability situation 
no problem. He says, "This agency 
experiences no difficulty in obtaining 
excellent spot availabilities, even on 
a weekly package basis. It seems to 
be almost always possible to buy 
good spots between 6 and 8 a.m." 



52 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



"Wow! How about 
the dramatic 

growth of audience 
on KEWB?!" 



"It's no surprise to 
me. I was one of the 
smart ones who 
bought KEWB first. 
Creative, business- 
like management; 
exciting program- 
ming and hard- 
hitting promotion 
like KEWB's always 
builds fast audience 
acceptance." 




,_^AN/V^ 



Does Hooper tell Pulse? Look for yourself at 
their July-August reports. . .and see that both 
services agree on the smashing, significant and 
colorful increase in the KEWB "Big Bay Radio" 
audience. 

So buy KEWB first ... and be big in the Bay Area. 




KEWB 



Bermuda Building • 2150 Franklin • Oakland 12, California • EX 7-2891 • TE 60910 
ROBERT M. PURCELL, president MILTON H. KLEIN, general manager 

THE KflTZ AGENCY, INC., national sales representatives 
A Service of Crowell-Collicr 



KEWB 

Channel 91 

San Frnncinco 

Oakland 



K F V» B 

Channel .9.? 
Los A ngelca 



KOBKKT .\I, ITKCKI.I, 

President 

and 

General Manager 



SPON.SOR 



24 OCTOBER 19.59 



53 



inisters time lo 

TOPEKR RKR & 
Central Kansas 
Gathers Bumper 
Wheat Harvest 

3rdYearof Excellent Crops 
Bwsts Bank Deposits to 
y^\ New Record^Heights 

TOPEKA^Special) -- 
, , Prosperity extends through- 
^ ^^°^P„Vontral Kansas and 
out all Central iva -g, 

the Topeka area as 1959^ 
^...mrlr-r ecord wheat crof J^ 
Willi 



TOPEKA 



t< 

I< 

u 



0^ 

d 

latii 
/. 

• g< 
to 



Has 1 TV Station 

WIBW-TV 



:\e. 
yer 

50- 



Is It! 






All Day- Every Day 

Survey- Proved 

^A/lB^v-TV 

Tops Competition 

. . . serving a total of 
38 Kansas Counties 

As A Bonus 

Wl BW-TV 

Is The ONLY 

TV Station Available 

to 100,000 

WHEAT-RICH 

TV HOMES 

in Central Kansas 

WIBW-TV 

CBS • NBC • ABC 
Channel 13 

TOPEKA, KANSAS 

(Division Stauffer-Copper Publications) 
Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



There will always be the problem 
of popular periods sold out. The 
classic steps in farm radio time- 
buying in such situations are fol- 
lowed by Hercules. Ginn explains, 
"Where a good farm director exists 
we attempt to sponsor a segment of 
his farm show, or to buy partici- 
pating spots within the format of 
the show. In cases where there is no 
farm director, we will try first for a 
farm news program or a weather pro- 
gram scheduled to reach a sizable 
farm audience. As a last resort, we 
will buy spots adjoining news or 
weather." 

On the other hand, Armour buys 
the traditional early morning and 
noon periods but finds that weather 
and news shows are just as effective 
as farm news programs when they 
fall in farm listening periods. 

There has been some talk about a 
"retrenchment" of farm radio pro- 
graming. This became news when 
Maynard Speece of WCCO. Minne- 
apolis, president of the National As- 
sociation of Television & Radio Farm 
Directors, wrote a letter to the FCC 
on 2 March expressing concern 
about "what appears to be a trend 
to discontinue farm broadcasting." 
Speece named names. Of the four 
stations cited, three denied, when 
queried by SPONSOR, any implications 
of farm radio cutbacks and one noted 
that it had not carried any farm pro- 
graming for six years. 

Admen questioned by SPONSOR 
were not aware of any farm radio 
retrenchment. One said that, on the 
basis of a comparison between 1954 
and 1959, there was "some" retrench- 
ment but "I don't believe it is as 
great as it may seem, due to the trend 
away from programs and toward 
spots." 

Erickson of Northrup, King re- 
plied: "I do not feel there has been 
any retrenchment by farm stations 
but rather a "shaking out" of some of 
those programs and stations that 
were not as basically and funda- 
mentally keyed to the farm market 
as others." 

If Erickson is correct, the shakeout 
should leave the medium stronger, 
what with these weak sisters no 
longer tarnishing its image. Farm 
radio can thus build on a more solid 
base. With farm tv's future still 
before it, the farm broadcast busi- 
ness has a promising future in the 
60's. ^ 



HESS & CLARK 

[Continued from page 42) 

tion in St. Louis. During the three- 
day conclave 50,000 hard-cooked eggs 
(the term is apparently preferred to 
"hard-boiled") were distributed to 
the accompaniment of varied fanfare. 

About 5,000 poultrymen and hatch- 
ery owners from all over the U.S. 
visited St. Louis for the poutry con- 
gress and watched this promotion 
in progress. The promotion, handled 
by Hess & Clark's agency, Klau-Van 
Pietersom-Dunlap, along with client 
representatives got involved in all 
sorts of community activities. Promi- 
nent local personalities on hand for 
the shindig were presented with gift 
baskets of eggs by four members of 
Foley's square dancing team from his 
tv program. The promotion got pub- 
licity breaks in newspapers and also 
some air time. One of the highlights 
of the tv coverage was a five-minute 
description of it on NBC TV's Today. 
In addition to the gift presentations, 
eggs were distributed in the lobbies 
of hotels, in and around Kiel Audi- 
torium, in restaurants and in other 
public places. 

Red Foley himself, along with other 
members of his organization, was on 
hand signing autographs and the like. 
Billboards were posted featuring a 
picture of the entertainer and the egg 
promotion slogan. 

An appreciative comment on the 
promotion came from Don Turnbull, 
executive secretary of American Poul- 
try Hatchery Federation: "There has 
never been another project which 
could match 'the golden goodness of 
eggs' at any industry convention in 
the U.S." 

As the result of the smashing suc- 
■ cess in St. Louis, the client was asked 
to bring the promotion to the Indi- 
ana State Fair held in Indianapolis 
early in September. Hess & Clark was 
only too happy to oblige. In addi- 
tion to the same hoopla and Foley's 
troupe, Art Linkletter and Rosemary 
Clooney were on hand to participate. 
By this time, radio farm directors had 
become aware of what was happen- 
ing. Many of those who came to the 
fair from various parts of Indiana 
and did shows on the fair grounds 
included coverage of the promotion. 

Next came the Dixie Poultry Show 
at Asheville, N. C. Here, the client 
— but by this time you should get the 
general idea. ^^ 



54 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 





"Listen to this, Bill", said tlie WeeReBeL as he sat on the desk to chat with Bill Hinman, 

Lambert 4 Feasley, Inc., New York. 

Have you heard what the UleeReBel 
said to lambert & Feasley? 

"We re a combination hard to heat..." 

Metropolitan Columbus, Georgia is the 25th market in the U. S. for per family income 
...over a million people can watch us in our 17 county coverage area... 
WRBL-TV and WRBL Radio are the stations that consistently pay off for advertisers. 
CALL HOLLINGBERY for top ratings, rate details . . . package plans . . . market 
data . . . programming information . . . penetration data . . . and prime availabHitics. 



WRBL 

TV-CHANNEL 4 • RADIO-5000 WATTS 

aioiuniBUS, CH.® 

Represented by George P. Hollingbery Co 




SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



DO 




I 



Audience 



How much money did you spend 
for food and groceries 
in the past seven days? 





WWDC Homes 


Total Sample 


% WWDC above or 
below Total Sample 


Less than $21 


21.4% 


26.9% 




-20.5% 


$21-$29 


29.4% 


32.4% 




- 9.3% 


$30-$39 


37.8% 


31.0% 




+21.9% 


$40 and over 


11.5% 


9.7% 




+ 18.6% 



What kind of people are WWDC listeners? We know from PULSE rating surveys that they 
give us the greatest total share of audience in the Washington, D. C. metropolitan area. But 
we wanted to know more about them personally— so we had PULSE do a special Audience 
Image Study. The profile that emerged is most revealing. Take the matter of groceries. 
215,763 WWDC homes spend $30 or more a week for food . . . 40.5% above the total sample 
average. Doesn't this give you food for thought? (Next month: TRAVEL). 

WWDC 

Radio Washington . . . the station that keeps people in mind 




56 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



What's happening in U. S. Governmenf 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



KHrs^^mc: 



IP WASHINGTON WEEK 



24 OCTOBER 1959 The big quiz show Congressional blow-off turns more and more into a get-the- 

copyright 1959 networks deal. 

SPONSOR One staff member of the House Commerce Legislative Oversight subcommittee 

PUBLICATIONS INC. icveals that the lawmakers are weighing a call for testimony from NBC p.r. chief Sid Eigus 

and perhaps other NBC execs. The $64,000 question is slated to be: why NBC was allegedly 
more worried about hushing up charges against "21" than in investigating them for truth. 

This, despite the fact that this point was already explained by previous NBC testimony 
to the effect that the only charges were brought by contestant Herbert Stempel. And that 
Dan Enright had a signed statement and submitted a tape recording from Stempel "admitting" 
falsity of charges. 

Talk about legislation to deal with the specific subject of rigging quizzers, current 
when the subcommittee started its hearings, has almost entirely faded away. Subcommit- 
tee members are now speaking in terms of putting networks under regulation, and they 
pointedly say that even independent program packagers should come under licensing- 
regulation. 

The NAB sectional meetings were kicked off in Washington, as usual. This time there 
was much preoccupation with the dangers of government program supervision 
rising out of the quiz show mess. 

A Fellows speech, a McGannon promise that the Tv Code Board would consider code 
revisions to take care of such matters in the future, and a warning speech by FTC chairman 
Kintner, all went to the same point. 

FCC chairman Doerfer added a speech at the RTNDA meeting in New Orleans, in which 
he blasted threats that the dead hand of government would be placed over tv pro- 
graming, but warned of the possibility. 

In short, the administrative agencies don't want to undertake any excursions into censor- 
ship, but pressure is growing in Congress. And it is the Congress which sets out the 
groundrules for the agencies to follow. 

The threat is still just a threat, and there is plenty of time for broadcasting industry ef- 
forts to turn the tide. Even considering the fact that the Harris subcommittee gets another 
chance at making headlines starting 2 November. 

Assuming the worst, however, the position of sponsors in the new picture would be a 
question mark. It can probably be assumed that they will be affected thuswise: freedom 
in supplying their choice of programs. 

The Department of Agriculture stuck its nose into the relative value of the vari- 
ous news media for food advertisers, and almost had its nose taken off by angry 
broadcasters: a USDA publication, summarizing a study, said that newspapers give adver. 
tisers the best forum in the food field. 

S. Q. Hoobler, who headed up the survey, immediately explained that the article in the 
publication was "misleading," that the statements to which broadcasters objected were 
"taken out of context.'* 

He said the survey clearly stated that few radio or tv stations engage to any extent in 
food programing, that housewives consequently get most of their food information from news- 
papers, and that where broadcasters do feature food it was found that their stations 
do much better in this field. 

ONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 57 




Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



24 OCTOBER 1959 

C«*yrlght l»59 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Tobacco money is one of the fastest growing areas of syndication support this 
season. 

CNP, for example, reports that $347,600 has been spent in its Not For Hire by L & M, 
Oasis, Chesterfield, Reynolds, R. J. Dun cigars, and Old Golds. 



MGM's long-awaited full scale plunge into tv is slated for the 1960-61 season 
in which 13 properties will be brought forth under a prudent investment strategy 
guided by a four-way insurance policy. 

Here are the basic safeguards MGM-TV will use to minimize risky outlays: 

1) Pilot production on order only: MGM-TV won't try to make either pilots or 
series without underwriting from a network or advertiser. 

2) Adaptations of feature films: Four of these may be Asphalt Jungle, Dr. Kildare, 
National Velvet and Father of the Bride. 

3) Literary properties: Three of this group are Agatha Christie, P. S. from Paris 
(based on Art Buchwald), and Mystery Street (using MGM-purchased properties). 

4) Staying out of syndication: For the time being, MGM-TV won't put on a syn- 
dication field sales force and intends to stay out of non-network selling. 

So far MGM-TV's only production expense is $21,000 for a 43-minute slide motion sound 
film presentation. (More details in FILM WRAP-UP, page 70.) 



More than a dozen syndicated shows have already earned themselves perpetual 
status because of their juvenile appeal in re-runs, and the fact that there's a new 
children's audience every few seasons. 

Among these hardy perennials are: Abbott & Costello, Amos & Andy, Badge 714, Cisco 
Kid, Gene Autry, Hopalong Cassidy, I Led Three Lives, Jungle Jim, Looney Tunes, Mr. & 
Mrs. North, Our Miss Brooks, Popeye, San Francisco Beat, Sheena, and Victory at Sea. 



The new importance of 7:00 p.m. time periods in syndication scheduling may 
alter programing conceptions and assist program types such as the "^daylight ad- 
venture," or outdoor action show. 

This type can be programed early, is acceptable to adult viewers, and is also interesting 
to younger audiences, as contrasted to the '*nighttime adventure," which is more ma- 
ture and more sophisticated. 

An extra benefit of "daylight adventure" accrues to the syndicator since many are 
cheaper to make than studio-filmed shows and do as well or even better in ratings; some 
are estimated to be budgeted at $22,500 average. 



58 



Wherever video-tape facilities are available, they appear to completely replace 
film in certain areas of station program production. 

A survey of 100 stations made by Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. revealed these average 
public service production uses of live, tape and film: 

• Production was 70% live and 30% film at non-tape stations. 

• Production was 70% live and 30% tape at tape-equipped stations. 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



RCA Victor is subsidizing an o&o of its family rival, CBS, to arrange for cer- 
tain local shows to be carried in color. 

KNXT, Los Angeles, is getting $500 a week to colorcast its feature film series, Satur- 
day Color Theater. 

RCA Distributing Corp. purchased two spots a week for 12 weeks and is understood to 
be paying around $280 a week for time. 

This amounts to a 180% bonus that an RCA subsidiary is paying to a CBS- 
owned station to transmit feature films in color. 



Westinghouse is attracting national advertising coin with its unusual syndica- 
tion operation, which offers special programing plus guaranteed prime time 
periods. 

Its Civil War series is almost sold out on its own stations to these five advertisers: Gen- 
eral Foods, Duke cigarettes, General Mills, Renault and Nationwide Insurance. 

A second area of Westinghouse activity is its cultural exchange program with ATV Ltd., 
the British commercial network, whereby Westinghouse gets a series of Michael Reddington 
productions, some of them on controversial subjects; these films will also likely be distrib- 
uted to non-Westinghouse outlets. 



A number of syndicators have become aware that it's impolitic to discuss openly 
new shows, in most cases, until at least a regional sale has been made. 

One reason is: The record of the past six months points up that syndication abandons 
some two-thirds of all the shows that are publicly offered to the trade. 

A check on a list of 30 new shows announced this past spring (FILM-SCOPE, 2 May) 
indicates that fewer than 10 have made any sales progress to date. 

One solution to this disturbing situation is this: A growing reluctance by syndicators 
to discuss openly new projects and even completed pilots. 

Keeping careful wraps on new shows keeps the product fresh in pitches to agency buyers, 
and also allows the companies to dispose of unsuccessful pilots and blueprints dis- 
creetly in private. 



Tape syndication got a boost last week when NTA made a daytime strip sale 
of the Mike Wallace Interview to IGA stores for WKY-TV, Oklahoma City. 

To assist the show, Wallace will make commercials, appear personally in Oklahoma City 
and do a special program on state Governor Edmondson. 



Wally Ross has completed a tour of European commercials festivals and has 
returned to New York to carry out plans for an American commercials show next 
April. 

Some salient differences in such a proposed U. S. commercials festival may be these, 
according to Ross: 

• It would be the first commercials show anywhere to highlight tape commercials, although 
film commercials will naturally be included. 

• Commercials would be reviewed from the agency and/or client viewpoint, rather than 
the producer's point of view. 

• Competition categories may be the seller's products or services, unlike foreign festivals 
which judge according to technical specifications. 

SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 59 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



SPONSOR HEARS 



24 OCTOBER 1959 Agency specialists on new business see little prospect of major account turn- 

cepyriBht 1959 ovcr for the next six months or so. 

The reason: The big ones are doing too well with sales. The time they usually look 
for a scapegoat is when the curve is downward or static. 



Schenley, apparently, hasn't given up on getting a hearing for its jingley ode to 
Friendly Schenley P.A. in radio: it's pitching the thing via BBDO to Ohio stations. 

The distiller did the same with Pennsylvania broadcasters in August but the response 
wasn't quite friendly. The stations there deemed it a case of round-about image pro- 
jection. 

For an interesting contrast of what's happened to program costs over the past 10 
years in live tv take the Ford series in NBC Tuesday nights. 

The average gross for a dramatic program in this series is $230,000. 

Back in 1949 when K&E produced the Ford Television Theatre (one hour) these were 
some of the production chits that went to the client: 

Arsenic and Old Lace, $20,958.86; One Sunday Afternoon, $22,191.07; Outward 
Bound, $21,259.37; The Silver Cord, $16,530.62; Night Must Fall, $18,626.01; The 
Man Who Came to Dinner, $19,130,89; Years Ago, $17,220. 



There are still some vestiges of the old-line tv pitchmen to be found in the business. 
Travelling agencymen tell of one who makes a habit of wearing his American Legion 
cap when putting on his routine for a local discount house. 



NBC Spot Sales is capitalizing on some of the sales ammunition that magazines 
have been using with advertisers. 

Singling out an account exclusively committed to magazines, the network's spot arm citei 
the caliber of noting and reading figures Starch gives that advertiser's ads and com- 
pares these with the manifoldly more impressions that are obtainable for the same 
money in spot. 

They're finding the pickings tougher but the tv time barter boys who specialize in 
station equipment are as active as ever. 

In return for blocks of time at 60% of the net card rates they're offering among 
other things video-tape machines, Zoomar lenses and even mobile units. 



A form of barter that does seem to be spreading is the exchange of promotion 
spots between tv stations and the sellers of billboards and carcards. 

They're usually according to each other's rate and, in some instances, if the parties 
have local agencies the commissions are protected. 

60 SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



IN 



DETROtt- 



YOU KNOW WHERE YOU'RE GOING WITH 




WJBKrTV 

CBS PROGRAMMING • CHANNEL 2 



Sales are UP in booming Detroit 

Dept. Store Sales UP 17% 

New Car Sales UP 97% 

Employment UP 9% 

Car and Truck Output UP 90%, 

(Sept. '59 vs Sept. '58 - Detroit Board of ("oinmerce) 

And UP is definitely the word for 

WJBK-TV viewers 

June and July ARB ratings 

were both 35.2% of audience. 

August is Up to 36.5%— 28% higher 

than any other Detroit station. 

(Second to only one CBS station in the country 
for audience share in 4-or-more station markets) 

You know where your audience 

and sales are going with WJBK-TV— 

They're going UP! 

a STORER station 



CALL KATZ 



STORER NATL SALES OFFICES 
6'25 Madison Ave., N.Y. 2i 



230 N. MichiRan Ave. 
Chicago i 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



61 



With conimercials becoming more elaborate, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What's new in film commercial i 




With a broadening range in tv 
film facilities and more creative 
leeway, commercial producers 
discuss new production methods 

Gerald Hirschfeld, A.S.C., v.p., MPO 

Television Films, Inc., New York-Hollywood 

Greater theatricality, production 

coordination and use of new process 

photography techniques — these are 



Greater 
theatricality, 
use of process 
photography 



three of the elements currently 
making possible better and different 
filmed commercials for television. 

The time element is the greatest 
limitation on theatricality in commer- 
cials. Sixty seconds is a short time 
in which to tell a product's story. 
much less create an arresting dra- 
matic situation to stimulate audi- 
ence interest. But we note a trend 
toward agencies devoting as much 
as 30 seconds of a spot to "situation " 
sequences in which the film producer 
can harness theatrical film techniques 
in direction, composition and imagi- 
native lighting. These sequences 
often do not mention the product. 
but set the stage for the best possible 
introduction of the "sell" sequence in 
the latter portions of the spot. To 
insure authenticity, many of these 
theatrical spots are shot on location. 

Elaborate production coordination 
techniques are making possible today 
rapid filming of commercials that 
would have been difficult and time- 
consuming only a few years ago. An 
intricate spot filmed by MPO for the 
Dreyfus Fund, Inc. was filmed using 
tight New York-Hollywood coordi- 
nation. Wall Street background was 
shot in actual location, with Holly- 
wood consulted on questions of angle 



and perspective, so when footage ar- 
rived on the West Coast (where the 
Dreyfus lion resides) MPO studios 
were prepared with an accurate setup 
for filming of foreground action. 

Finally, imaginative use of process 
photography is making possible the 
creation of highly unusual commer- 
cials at great savings in cost and 
time. MPO's patented Spectrumatte 
process, for example, enabled the 
filming of a Maidenform "dream" 
scene in which a girl is seen floating 
up through the air alongside a sky- 
scraper. In this case, actual staging 
of the sequence would have created 
a safety hazard in addition to high 
location costs. But with Spectrumatte, 
the girl was filmed in the studio 
against infra-red background and the 
footage was combined with the back- 
ground filmed on location. Production 
values in all cases are identical with 
actual photography of a real scene. 
With Spectrumatte the only limita- 
tion is the copywriter's imagination. 

Fred Levinson, exec, producer. Trans- 
film-Wylde Animation, New York 
There's not much creative leeway 



All-art visuals 
in squeeze 
commercial 
method 



in the production of I.D.'s, but 
Horton, Church & Goff, Inc., the 
Providence ad agency, had the right 
idea for its client Page & Shaw. The 
candy maker was entering tv for the 
first time and we were commissioned 
by the agency to produce four I.D. 
commercials. The technique chosen 
was "visual squeeze." But, the 
agency went two steps further than 
the present users of squeeze. 

Page & Shaw became the first user 
of all-art visuals in its squeeze com- 
mercials. Heretofore, we had used 




either still photos alone or in com- 
bination with line art drawings. 
Second, and perhaps more signifi- 
cant, the agency allowed us to tap a 
fresh resource for art. From the 
ranks of Mad comics, with its mas- 
sive circulation, we hired one of their 
top illustrators. Bill Elder, whose 
unique and whimsical style has never 
before been used in the tv medium. 
We adapted his characters to Page 
& Shaw's story boards and believe 
we have created commercials well out 
of the me-too class of I.D.'s. 

There have been isolated cases of 
other clients using print media car- 
toonists for tv commercials. In past 
years, I have employed a Saturday 
Evening Post cartoonist for several 
jobs. Transfilm used England's popu- 
lar Punch cartoonist Ronald Searle 
for a fihn which appeared on .Tersey 
Standard's anniversary show. But, 
the practice has not received the in- 
dustry support it deserves, and I 
believe it is a loss both to sponsors 
and to the tv medium itself. Why? 

When a sponsor buys a cartoon 
style which is easily recognized and 
pre-sold (Partch, Addams, etc.) he 
is, in effect, also buying an endorse- 
ment for his product. And, he is 
buying the most important element of 
all, the means to command attention. 
These art styles, some well-known and 
others less-known — but all unique — 
now fill magazines and newspapers. 

Such cartoons have proven popu- 
larity and, once brought to life via 
the animator's brush, can become 
strong allies in a commercial cam- 
paign. They further enable the spon- 
sor to have a logical and beneficial 
tie-in between tv and print media. 

With more agency and sponsor 
encouragement, the spot producer 
can certainly bring a new and valu- 
able look to animated cartoons. 

William Van Praag, pres.. Van Praag 
Productions, New York 
Commercial production has reached 
new heights in creativity and imagi- 
nation. A three-way wedding of 



62 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



BEST SELLER IN HOUSTON 




echniques' 



advertising copy, precision editing 
and creative production earmark the 
commercial of today. In fact, very 



Techniques 
better coordi- 
nated with com- 
mercial story 



often today's commercials get more 
critical acclaim than the programs on 
which they appear. 

In the early days, tv film commer- 
cials offered a f^eld day to the film 
technician. Pictures popped, rippled 
wiped and exploded. They buzzed 
with effects and ranted and raved. 
They were good commercials in their 
time— but the times have changed. 
Today's commercials must have a 
total appeal. No longer is an effect, 
optical or otherwise, sufficient unto 
itself. The commercial concept is 
one of a completely coordinated unit. 
The various commercial techniques 
are no longer individually significant. 
They must be blended together by 
the producer. Music, words and 
effects must creatively fit picture and 
action. All must be fully exploited 
and mixed with rhythm and pace to 
deliver the necessary commercial 
story. Yet the interrelationship and 
flow of the elements must be natural 
and real. The viewer's senses must 
be stimulated as a whole so that he 
actually "feels" not just views the 
commercial. Reach the people com- 
pletely—move them to action— and 
you've sold them. 

The power of the new approach 
Ues in the producer's deft handling 
of his medium. His aim is total sense 
effectiveness on the viewer. Stimulate 
them and sell them. This is the pro- 
ducer's creative challenge of the day. 

Harold E. Wondsel, i>res., Wondsel 
Carlisle & Dunphy, New York 
WCD has developed, if not a new 
{Please turn to page 75) 



,alii' 



iM 



IB 0! 



VENDING 




KiNIIZ 

Houston's^. 24-Hour 
--Music a)idJI'ews- 






American Airlines 

American Lamb Council 

Armour Company 

Arthur Murray 

Baker's Hair Tonic 

Ben-Gay 

B.C. 

Blackberry Julep Quicktoil 

Blue Crosi 

Borden's Evaporated Milk 

Bromo-Seltzer 

Busch Bavarian Beer 

Cadillac 

Camel Cigarettes 

Champion Spark Plugs 

Chevrolet 

Cook Book Bread 

Cream of Wheat 

Dash Dog Food 

Economics labs 

Evereody Batteries 

Folstaff Brewing 

Feenomint and Chooz 

Folger's Coffee 




Ford Cars 


Q-Tips 


Ford Trucks 


Ralston Corn Chex 


Gillette Safety Raior 


Royco 


Hormel Packing Co. 


R.C. Colo 


Hostess Oonuts 


Red Heart Dog Food 


Jones Blair Paints 


Riviera Cigarettes 


Kuhn Point Company 
Ladies Home Journal 


St. Joseph Aspirin 
Schliti Beer 


Lone Star Beer 
Mercury 


Seven-Eleven 
Shulton Desert Flower 
Hand and Body Lotion 


Mexsana Powder 
Mrs. Boird's Bread 


Silk 'N Satin 
Sinclair Oil 


My-T-Fine j 


outhwestern Bell Telephone 


National Airlines 


Stonbock 


No-Doz 


Swell 


Oak Forms Dairies 


Swifts Meats 


Odorono 


Tompo Nugget Cigars 


Pocquins Hand Cream 


Tennessee Life Insurance 


Poll Mall 


Texas State Optical 


Peocemoker Flour 


Tronn-Texas Airwoys 


Pearl Beer 


Trig 


Poll Porrot Shoes 


Winston Cigarettes 


Prestone Anti-Freeie 


Wrigleys 


National Reps-'- 


THl Un AG 


ENCY, Int. 


• New York 

• Chicago 

• Detroit 

• Atlanta 


• St. Louis 

• San Francisco 

• Los Angeles 

• Dallas 


HOUSTON, CALL DAVE 


MORRIS JAckson 3-2581 



63 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



National and regional buys 
in uork now or recently completed 



Slf^fUP I 



mjp-^^ 



TV BUYS 

Best Foods Div. of Corn Products Co., Inc., New York: Campaign 
for Nucoa margarine starts November. Schedules are for six weeks, 
with daytime 60"s and prime 20's. Buyers: Lynn Salzberg and Jay 
Walters. Agency: Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, New York. 

Bourjois, Inc., New York: Getting its pre-Christmas push ready in 
100 markets for Evening In Paris Perfume. Schedules of daytime 
and fringe night minutes start 30 November for three weeks. Buyer: 
Anita Wasserman. Agency: Lawrence C. Gumbinner A. A., New York. 

Quaker Oats Co., Chicago: Going into new southern markets for 
Quaker Corn Meal, with some Negro stations being lined up. Minutes 
and 20's will be used in the 37-week buy. Buyer: Marilyn McDermott. 
Agency: John W. Shaw Adv., Chicago. 

Armour & Co., Chicago: New activity on its Ham What Am canned 
meat starts on or about 14 December in about 25 markets. Schedules 
of day and night minutes, saturation as high as 90 per week in some 
markets, are being placed. Buyer: Don Heller. Agency: N. W. Ayer 
& Son, Phila. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: Adding schedules in scattered 
markets for Crest toothpaste, using night minutes to run through 
P&G contract year. Buyer: Larry Berdon. Agency: Benton & Bowles, 
Inc., New York. 

Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc., New York: Planning an 18-week cam- 
paign in top markets for Vaseline hair tonic. Placements of day and 
night minutes start 15 November. Buyer: Hal Commings. Agency: 
Norman, Craig & Kummel. New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

John Morrell & Co., Chicago: Minutes and I.D.'s are being set in 
about 50 markets for Red Heart Dog Food. Flights start early 
November for six weeks, then return in January on a three-weeks in 
and one-week out basis for about 36 weeks. This is not a renewal of 
its big campaign last spring and, although many of the same markets 
are being used, schedules are being treated as a new buy. Buyer: June 
Nelson. Agency : John W. Shaw Adv., Chicago. 

General Motors Corp., Detroit: L'sing broadcast schedules for the 
first time to promote GM Fisher Body styles and construction. Two- 
and three-week traffic and da\ runs of minutes and 30's are planned, 
ranging from 18 to 100 per week per market. Starting date depends 
on steel strike situation. Buyer: Mai Murray. Agency: Kudner 
Agency, Inc., New York. 

Stokely-Van Camp, In?., Indianapolis: Placing four four-week 
flights for this year and next for Ping, Pong and Pi-Li fruit juices. 
Schedules are for minutes, start early November. Buyer: Rudy 
Bauniohl. Agency: Lennen & Newell, Inc., New York. 



64 



What if you're out 
to reach the 
cotton pickin' set' 



Is your market regional? Coverage 
easier when your show is on flln 
Every station in the land is equippe 
to handle it . . . and you know yoi 
message comes through the way yo 
want it to ! 

Actually, film does three things f c ^ 
you ... 3 big important things: ■ 

1 . Gives you the high-polish con 
mercials you've come to exp^ 
. . . fluff-free . . . sure 

2. Gives you coverage with fu 
pre-test opportunities 

3. Retains residual values 




For more information write: 

Motion Picture Film Department 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY] 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 

East Coosf Division ■ ■ 
342. Madison Ave. 
New York 1 7, N. Y. 

Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Drive 
Chicago, III. 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 



W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution ol 
Eastman Professional Motion Picture Filr 
Fort Lee, N. J.; Chicago, III.; 
Hollywood, Calif. 



"^-f- 



~->»«4 





t^- 




Always shoot it on EASTMAN FILM . . . You'll be glad you did! 



NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



FOR SAFE KEEPING: Jack Rattigan (rj, of 
WRCV, Phila., assisted by Mitii DemeHou 
and George Geuder, of Provident Tradesmen 
Bank, deposits one million Top Value stamps 
as prizes in station's "Finders Keepers Game" 



TEA-TOTALERS participate in merchandis- 
ing stunt staged at Northland shopping cen- 
ter, by WJW, Detroit to introduce station's 
new remote broadcasting facilities. 10,000 
cups of clients' tea and cookies were served 





ADVERTISERS 



General Mills started the trend in 
oat cereals with Cheerios, but 
General Foods' Post division is 
the first to market-test a flake in 
the oat field (viaB&B). 

Incidentally, Cheerios turned out to 
be General Mills' first big winner 
since Wheaties. G. F.'s counter-brand 
to Cheerios is Alphabets and Kellogg's 
OK. 

Management is to blame for the 
complacent attitude toward mar- 
ket research and researchers, Joe 
Ratner, director, creative and 
marketing services. General 
Mills, told a Chicago chapter meeting 
of the AMA last week. 

He supported this contention by in- 
dicating that top management has an 
anti-intellectual attitude toward re- 
search, using it primarily as a crutch 
or club. 

Researchers, Ratner added, are as 
much to blame for helping to foster 
this relationship. Their reports are 



STRICTLY FOR LAUGHS: To placate viewers' vexation when picture fails, KYW-TV, Cleveland, flashes this on the screen to explain difficulties 




fE HAVE TEMPORARILY LOST OUR VIDEO 



niCACC CTilKin DV 



too long and are primarily factual 
with few constructive recommenda- 
tions. 

Campaigns : 

• Morton Salt Co., as part of a 
product diversification effort, added 
pepper to its line last week. Needham, 
Louis & Brorby will be handling it 
along with the salt. Right now basic 
market research is in progress, after 
which test markets will be selected. 
Chances are that some tv. according 
to agency planners, will be used in 

test markets. 

• S&W Fine Foods is set for a 
major saturation spot tv campaign, 
for the Holiday season, on 24 tv sta- 
tions covering 13 West Coast markets 
(including Alaska and Hawaii), plus 
the New York and Chicago metropoli- 
tan markets. These spots will feature 
a variety of key items in the S&W 
line, with special emphasis on Glace 
Fruit Mix and Mincement. Agency: 
Honig-Cooper, Harrington & Miner, 
San Francisco. 

• Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical 
Discovery, stomach tonic, launched. 



last week, an intensive six-month drive 
on radio and in print. The radio cam- 
paign, on 70 stations, will include two 
test versions of the identical copy ap- 
proach. One will be a series of drama- 
tized commercials for markets east of 
the Mississippi; the second will be a 
set of straight commercials for west- 
ern markets. Agency: Mogul Williams 
& Saylor. 

Strictly personnel: Edwin A. 
Snow, advertising manager of P&G 
since 1957, has been made a v.p. . . . 
James Kirkman, Jr., elected execu- 
tive v.p. for marketing at Ward Bak- 
ing Co. . . . Fred Sands, to director 
of marketing and Grant Stinchfield, 
sales promotion manager for Phar- 
maceuticals, Inc. . . . C. A. McCary, 
to assistant national sales manager for 
Ralston Purina Co. ... J. J. Harris, 
to the Columbia Phonograph depart- 
ment of CBS Electronics as district 
manager, Metropolitan district . . . 
Robert Weppler, appointed man- 
ager of the advertising and sales pro- 
motion department of Cities Service 
Oil Co. 



AGENCIES 



A Boston agency — Kay Barron — 
is putting up ab<»ul $4.()()(). time 
and pro<luction for a one-time 
shot on a local station to talk 
about advertising and the role 
played by the agency. 

The event it's sponsoring: the 
mayoralty election returns on WBZ- 
TV. 

Agency appointments: The Ice 

Cream Division of DCA Food Indus- 
tries, New York, to Ted Bates & Co. 
. . . McLendon Radio Stations. Dallas, 
to Clarke, Dunagan & Huffhines, 
also of that city . . . Diamond Spring 
Brewery, Lawrence, Mass.. to Cavan- 
augh Morris Advertising, Pitts- 
burgh. 

New Agency: Swan & Mason Ad- 
vertising, headquartered at 509 
Madison Avenue, New York and 
headed by Robert Swan, former v.p. 
of The Joseph Katz Co. 




TRADING STUDIO FOR A TENT: KTVH, Hutchinson, is seen here 
moving facilities to Kansas State Fair, where station originated telecasts 



'FABULOUS 4 FUNHOUSE/ erected by WKY-TV, Okla. City, for 
recent state fair, attracted 75,000 fun-loving youngsters and adults 




KISSIN' KAR: D.j.'s at KOIL, Omaha hav2 painted up this auto, along AT HALF-TIME FESTIVITIES of high school footL.;. ^onio, Gaines 
with an "I Love KOIL" slogan. They're asking teenagers to guess the no. Kelley (c), gen. mgr. of WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. presents watches, 
of hearts and kisses on the "Teen Car." The prize: car — as is! to station's 10-year old king and queen as m.c. Jimmy Dean looks or« 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



6T 



Added offices: Boylhart, Lovett & 
Dean, Los An^Bles agency opened a 
Washington, D. C. office last week at 
734 50th Street, Northwest. 

Maxon appointed three new v.p.'s 
last week. 

They are: Victor Kenyon, who di- 
rects the Detroit tv/radio department; 
James Macpherson. Detroit account 
executive and Allen Hodshire, tv/ 
radio executive in the New York 
office. 

They were named v.p.'s: Ander- 



son Hewitt, to Compton as senior 
v.p., member of the board of direc- 
tors and member of the administra- 
tive committee . . . William Temp- 
leton, to v.p. and director of radio/ 
tv department at C&W . . . Del 
Franklin, v.p. in charge of radio/tv 
station relations for Rutledge & Lil- 
ienfeld . . . George Hamm, Neil 
McBain and Eugene Kolkey, to 
v.p.'s at Leo Burnett . . . William 
Foxen, v.p. and account supervisor 
for the Joseph Katz Co. . . . James 
Kovach, v.p. for radio/tv operations 
at Waltjen Associates, Baltimore . . . 




/ 

9 
5 
9 



anniversary 

WOC-TV Ch. 6 

Davenport, Iowa— Rock Island— Moline, Illinois 
The Nation's Forty-Seventh TV Market 

On October 31, 1949, WOC-TV went on the air. FIRST in the 
Quint-Cities — FIRST in Iowa. This was in keeping with the fore- 
sight and courage of Colonel B. J. Palmer, who had pioneered the 
first radio station west of the Mississippi in 1922. 

In 1949, there were less than 400 TV sets available to receive WOC- 
TV's first broadcast. On this 10th anniversary date, there are more 
than 438,000 sets in a 42- 
county area. WOC-TV land 
today is rated as the 47th TV 
market in the nation. 



WOC-TV continues to main- 
tain its leadership and success 
in serving its viewers and its 
advertisers. 

Your PGW Colonel has all 
the facts. See him today! 




DAVENPORT 
BETTENDORF 

ROCK ISLAND 
MOLINE 
EAST MOLINE 



WOC-TV DAVENPORT, IOWA IS PART OF CENTRAL BROADCASTING CO., 
OPERATES WHO-TV ANO WHO RAOIOi DES MOINES, IOWA. 



WHICH ALSO OWNS AND 



Fred Roth, v.p. of Grant . . . Rich- 
ard Stephens, v.p. and director of 
public relations at Kastor, Hilton, 
Chesley, Clifford & Atherton. 

Add to personnel appointments: 
E. J. Lauesen, to Waldie & Briggs, 
Chicago as chairman of the executive 
committee . . . Warren Erhardt, to 
associate media director in the New 
York office of F&S&R . . . William 
Alexander, to account executive and 
director of radio/tv at Hege, Middle- 
ton & Neal, Greensboro ... Stephen 
Gardner, to merchandising director 
at Beckman, Koblitz, Los Angeles . . . 
Jon Christopher, to the creative 
staff at EWR&R, Chicago . . . Paula 
Reece, to director of radio/tv at the 
Gulf State Advertising Agency, Dan- 
ville . . . Charles Booth, account 
supervisor, Enyart & Rose Advertis- 
ing, Los Angeles . . . Robert Smith, 
to timebuyer at W. B. Doner & Co., 
Chicago . . . Four new account execu- 
tives at Kudner: Frederic Cowan, 
Robert Lehman, Leon Wortman 
and John Mazey . . . Walter Smith 
Jr., account executive at Norman, 
Craig & Kummel . . . Nathaniel Mor- 
gan, to the market research depart- 
ment at Knox Reeves Advertising, 
Minneapolis. 

Deceased: James Andrew McGarry, 
assistant to the president of BBDO. 



FILM 



Prospects for expanding overseas 
business by U. S. film syndicators 
continued to look up brightly j 
last week. 

Dealing with 16 countries on 21 
different shows, Ziv International, for 
example, reported a 300% increase 
in business for this September over 
the same month last year. 

Sales: WNBQ reports CNP's Union 
Pacific sold to Grand Central Motors, 
through Leland-David Advertising . . . 
CNP reports the following tobacco 
advertisers in its Not For Hire series : 
Old Gold on WNEW-TV, New York; 
L & M on KABC-TV, Los Angeles; 
Oasis & Chesterfield on WAVE-TV, 
Louisville; R. J. Reynolds on KARD- 
TV, Wichita, WKRG-TV, Mobile, and 
WHTN-TV, Huntington; and Dun 
cigars on WWJ-TV, Detroit, WTVI, 
St. Louis, and WLIX-TV, Lansing. 



68 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 




"Egad! Blair Did It Again. 



55 



"There I was," quoth our man, "loaded for Blair. I 
had data up to the collar of my Burberry ... a portable 
calculator in my attache case. My Diner's card was at 
the ready; my Express cards, rail travel card, airline 
card, three gasoline credit cards, and old W.D. A.G.O. 
Form 65 were present and accounted for. I had a 
black knit tie on and my heavy-frame bi-focals were all 
revved up. Man, I was like ripe." 

"Never mind the autobiog. Just tell us did you get the 
business?" 

"Well, frankly, no. We already had it. The Blair man 



just said to the chap, 'You know — The Roanoke station 
with the 58-county market of 448,001 tv homes.' " 
" '. . . 448 thousand and one?' asked the chap." 
" '. . . and one,' said the Blair man." 



WSLS-TV 

Channel 10 • NBC Television 

Mail Address: Roanoke, Va. 
A broadcast service (with WSLS Radio) 
of Shenandoah Life Insurance Company 



Production : MGM-TV revealed 
plans to film up to 13 tv series, con- 
tingent on orders for pilot or series 
production. (See FILM-SCOPE, p. 
58) Titles include Me and My Gab, 
The Paradise Kid, Steven V, Gold 
Eagle Gun, The Islanders and Night 
People. Already sold are Father of 
the Bride to ABC TV and The Island- 
ers and Asphalt Jungle to undis- 
closed network buyers. Of the prop- 
erties listed, the following are in- 
tended for full-hour treatment: The 
Islanders, Agatha Christie, Mystery 
Street and Asphalt Jungle. 

Promotion: WIBW-TV, Topeka, 
has tested Screen Gems' Manhunt on 
its own police force and has found it 
to be creditable although given to his- 
trionic excess. Said the police viewing 
jury: Too many sirens, high speeds 
or carelessness with weapons (63%), 
but good entertainment (940f ), fair 
to detectives (94%) and pride-in- 
spiring (83%). 

Spot carriers: Syndicated re-runs 
are attracting many national adver- 
tisers' spot schedules, according to a 
Ziv study. Lee Rich, Benton & 
Bowles media v. p., attributed usage to 
"the very familiarity of the shows, 
the generally good quality level of the 
programs and — in the case of five-a- 
week strips — the persistent unity of 
time and the consequent cumulative 
loyalty of the viewer." Ziz surveyed 
five stations and found these spot ad- 
vertisers using its Economy programs: 
WABC-TV, New York: Procter 
& Gamble, Ford, Woolite, Internation- 



al Latex, Doan's pharmaceuticals, 
Wine Advisary Board. 

WNEW-TV, New York: Vicks, 
Lestoil, Dromedary Cake Mix, Bumble 
Bee Tuna, Oakite, Ideal Toys, Robert 
Hall, Ex-Lax, Hasbro Toys, Tastee 
Cake. 

CKLW-TV, Detroit: Anahist, 
Arrid, Dash, Crisco, Mr. Clean, Fri- 
tos. Clorox, Polident, Robert Hall, 
Block Drug. 

WGR-TV, Buflfalo: Lever Bros. 
(Gayla ) . Penick & Ford desserts, Con- 
tinental Baking, Regimen Tablets, 
Bufferin. 

KPHO-TV, Phoenix: Cheer, Spic 
& Span, Dawn Soap, Ovaltine. 

Among the shows studied were Mr. 
District Attorney, West Point, Men 
of Annapolis, Science Fiction Theatre, 
Harbor Command, 1 Led Three Lives 
and Yesterday's Newsreel. 

Strictly personnel: Elliot Millner 

to ITC as research director . . . Don 
Hershey joins Bill Sturm Studios as 
producer-director. 

Video-tape: A relative guide to the 
importance of the 50 states as produc- 
tion centers in the future can be ob- 
tained from an analysis of where one 
manufacturer, Ampex, had delivered 
227 of its Videotape recorders by 
September. 

The states rank as follows: 
California, 53; New York, 49; Texas, 
17; Illinois, 16; Missouri, 12; Penn- 
sylvania, 10; Michigan, seven; Flori- 
da, six; Ohio, five; Virginia, five; 
Massachusetts, four; Oklahoma, four; 
Connecticut, three; Indiana, three; 



Iowa, three; Washington, three; Col- 
orado, two; Hawaii, two; Louisiana, 
two; Maryland, two; Minnesota, 
two; Oregon, two; Rhode Island, 
two; South Carolina, two; Utah, two; 
Georgia, one; Kentucky, one; Ne- 
braska, one; North Carolina, one; 
West Virginia, one; Wisconsin, one, 
and District of Columbia, one. 

Ranking of mobile equipment 
(not included above) is similar; 
California, five; New York, four; 
Florida, three; Missouri, two; New 
Jersey, two, and Michigan, one. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Bartell Broadcasting has joined 
the ranks of group ownerships 
offering the public stock partici- 
pation. 

The underwriter is W. W. Schroed- 
er & Co. The issue is 54,545 shares, 
offered to the public at $5.50 per 
share. 

Two RAB spokesmen this week 
chided the oil and gasoline mar- 
keters for not "tapping the fam- 
ily oil well." 

Warren Boorom, v. p. of RAB, 
told the Automotive Advertisers Coun- 
cil that "there's only one accessory 
in the automotive world that's also 
an advertising medium in itself — auto 
radio." At the same time he pointed 
sharply to the "few manufacturers in 
the automotive aftermarket who've 
taken advantage of the unique advan- 
tages radio offers to them." 

Calling radio the key to gas station 



6,000,000 eyes/ ears -- listen /watch Green Bay's Channel ''S" 



This is why La Combe IVlack had a 100% sales 
increase of trucks the first month they sponsored 
a Tuesday night sports shovv'. This is why their 
sales have continued to climb at the same high 
rate since last April. 



'0 



j^kick) ■''»«. 



Ellis La Combe says . . . "Despite the high cost of 
television advertising, it's worth double what it cost 
since it reaches so many people in Northeastern 
Wisconsin and Upper Michigan that I could not reach 
any other way." 

This dramatically proves the effectiveness of Green 

Bay's quality station! 

Another sure proof of the 

best 
cost 
per 
million 

wfrv green bay 5 

highest tower — maximum power 



70 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



customers, Kevin Sweeney, RAB 

president told the marketing research 
committee of the American Petroleum 
Institute that "more than half 
(54.2%) of all motorists are ex- 
posed to radio during the hours he- 
fore they pull up to the pump." He 
quoted this from a recent study of 
media habits of drivers entering gas 
stations. He offered, for RAB, to in- 
vest $20,000 to help an oil company 
research a radio campaign designed 
to dominate the car radio audience. 

Ideas at work: 

• Driving marathon: To intro- 
duce the new Corvair, and sponsored 
by the Bumstead Chevrolet Dealer of 
Troy, John Mounteer, d.j. on WTRY, 
Albany-Schenectady-Troy set some 
type of record by driving it for 50 
hours without sleep. The car was 
fitted with mobile radio equipment, 
and broadcasts were made from there 
while it was being driven. 

• Lucky license: WFEA, Man- 
chester, N. H. is sponsoring a con- 
tinuous "lucky license contest." This 
week the winner got $121 for hearing 
his number read on the air, calling 
the studio within the required time, 
and showing up with a WFEA "Safe- 
ty Driver" bumper strip on his car. 
To date, station has distributed some 
5,.500 bumper stickers — the only re- 
quirement for eligibility. 

• Ingenuity paid ofif: KTBC, 

Austin got a contract last week from 
a furniture dealer to sponsor sta- 
tion's morning newscast bv utilizing 
the unsponsored commercial time to 
make a pitch aimed directly at the 
prospective client. The . newscaster 
commented on what a natural vehicle 
the program would be to sell furni- 
ture, and ended the "commercial" by 
informing the store owner that a sales- 
man would call after he ( the furniture 
man I had finished breakfast. The re- 
sult: the owner was listening, and 
signed the contract when the station 
called. 

Add daflfodils: D.j.'s at KOIL, 

Omaha assumed the role of targets 
last week when listeners had the op- 
portunity to plaster their favorite 
d.j. with custard pie at the Municipal 
Stadium just prior to a football game. 
The pies were sold for 50< each, with 
the money donated to the university 
scholarship fund. 

' SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



Station acquisitions: WDVM, Po- 

comoke City, Md., to Ernie Tannen, 
sales manager of WTTG-TV, Wash- 
ington, for $120,000 . . . KJOE, 
Shreveport, to Ray Armand, executive 
v.p. of Continental Broadcasters for 
$100,000 — both transactions brokered 
by Blackburn & Co. 

Station staffers: Harvey Hudson, 

to v.p. and director of I^e Broad- 
casting Corp., Richmond . . . Charles 
Sitta, to v.p. in charge of national 
sales of Knorr Broadcasting Corp. . . . 
Gil Newsome, to station manager; 
Don Hamcl, general sales manager 
and Gene Davis, program director, 
KWK, St. Louis . . . Richard Faulk- 
ner, to sales manager for WMAQ, 
Chicago . . . Leonard Goorian, to 
exploitation manager, WKRC, Cincin- 
natti . . . Patricia Wright, promo- 
tion and research director, KPOP, 
Los Angeles . . . Bob Morrow, sales 
promotion and research director, 
WINS, New York . . . Larry Coy, to 
the sales staff, KYA, San Francisco. 



TV STATIONS 



The Corinthian Stations have 
been merged with John Hay 
Whitney's Publishing and other 
Communication interests into a 
company to be known as Whit- 
ney Communications Corp. 

The transfer of the five television 
and two radio stations is from J. H. 
Whitney & Co., which controlled 
Corinthian. Whitney Communica- 
tions Corp. becomes the successor to 
Plymouth Rock Publications and the 
parent company of Corinthian Broad- 
casting Corp. 

More people in the U. S. view tv 
between 6 p.m. and 12 midnight 
than read daily newspapers all 
day, a new TvB report reveals. 

The figures: 116,521,000 p.m. tv 
viewers compared with 104,414,000 
daily newspaper readers. 

The study, "How Big is Big" com- 
pares tv's audience with the number 
of newspaper and magazine readers. 

It also notes that more men and 
women view tv in every time period 
between 6 and 10:30 p.m. on the 
average day than read any magazine 
or Sundav supplement. 

Ideas at work: 

• How to win friends and in- 



WNAX-570 

GIVES YOU 175 COUNTY 
COVERAGE IN RICH 

BIG AGGIE LAND 

Big Aggie I.amI covcis I7."> cuimties in the 
Dakotas, Minnesota, Moiiiana, Nebraska 
and Iowa. It's big. And it's one of the 
nation's best buys in radio. WNAX-570 
dclixeis the lion's share of the 609,590 
radio homes — 2(4 million people with 
.|3 billion to spend. Big -Xggie Land is a 
major U.S. Radio Market. Profitable pro- 
motion in this prosperous market begins 
with WN.\X-570. See your Kal/. man. 

WNAX-570 

CBS Radio • Yankton, S. D.; Sioux City, Iowa 



® 



PROGRAMMING FOR 
ADULTS OF ALL AGES 

Peoples Broadcasting Corporation 

WNAX. Yankton, Soiilh Dakota 

KVTV. Sioux City. Iowa 

WGAR, Clcvelanil, Ohio 

WRFD, Worthinglon, Oliio 

WTTM. Trenton. New .Tersey 

WMMN. Fairmont. West VivRinia 






WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand of 
all Indiana TV stations! 



One hundred and eleven national 
advertisers 





WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL 10 • CBS— ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 



Represented N.itionally 
by Boiling Co. 



71 



BIGGER 



than you think 

Hot Springs beats cities twice 
its size in general merchandise 
sales, in drug store sales, in 
apparel store sales. 

Tourists and vacationers swell 
its population all year long . . . 
and spend ! Reach them over 
the "sell" station. Enjoy top 
ratings, too. 



KBHS 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 

5000 watts at 590 kc 



Rep: NY-Clark; Chicago-Sears & Ayer; 
South-Clarke Brown 



"NATURALLY, I 
LISTEN TO KFWB" 

"For satisfaction from a perfect, 
precision machine that makes 
a winner, give me sportscar 
V competition. 

In broadcasting, that same pre- 
. cision . . . perfectly tuned . . . . 

comes through to me with 
if KFWB ... so, naturally, I listen 



■< 



to KFWBw" 



W\ 



The KFWB audience gives you 
more men, women, children . . . 
more everybodies . . . than any 
other Los Angeles station. 
Buy KFWB . . . first in Los 
Angeles. 




6419 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28/ HO 3-5151 

ROBERT M. PURCELL, President and Gen. Manager 
JAMES F. SIMONS, Gen. Sales Manager 
Represented nationally by JOHN BUtlR t CD. 



fluenee programing: WABC-TV, 

New York adopted a new approach to 
had reviews. The station reprinted 
some of the critics' remarks ahout 
Everything Goes (on week nights, 
11:15-12:15) as ads in metropolitan 
newspapers, asking the public to view 
the show and write the station as to 
whether they agreed or disagreed with 
the bad reviews. Response: letters 
praising station for reprinting re- 
views, and maintaining that the show 
has its good and bad points. 

• Answering an emergency ap- 
peal: WNEM-TV, Flint-Saginaw- 
Bay City, recently staged a telethon at 
the request of the National Founda- 
tion and the local March of Dimes 
chapters. It aired continuously for 
18 hours and was promoted by tv 
spots before the big show, and pa- 
rades in the cities calling attention 
to the telethon. Results : about SlOO,- 
000 was pledged. 

Thisa 'n' data: TvB last week sent 
a letter to Secretary of Agriculture 
Benson taking issue with Agricultural 
Marketing's report that "newspapers 
are the best medium for food advertis- 
ing." Notes TvB: 72% of the grocers 
surveyed by the Marketing Planning 
Corp. prefer tv to move merchandise 
. . . WGAN-TV, Portland, Me. got its 
picture in the paper in two parts. The 
reason: station's new tower (1,619') 
posed a vexing problem for printing 
a top to bottom photograph. So the 
newspaper printed the top section of 
the tower on page one and the re- 
mainder on page three . . . Kudo: 
WKRC-TV, Cincinnati, presented 
with an Award of Appreciation from 
the United Appeal. 

Station acquisition : WSFA-TV, 

Montgomery, Ala., to G. Richard 
Shafte of the Broadcasting Co. of the 
South for S2.25 million. 



On the personnel front: Lawrence 
Turet, to executive v. p. and station 
manager of WXIX-TV, Milwaukee 
. . . Harold Spielman, to v.p. of 
Schwerin Research Corp . . . Edward 
Warren, program manager, WGN- 
TV, Chicago . . . William Hamilton, 
to acting general manager, WNDU- 
TV, Soudi Bend-Elkhart . . . Charles 
Hutaff, program manager, WGR- 
TV, Buffalo. 



NETWORKS 



While NBC Radio this week 
sought to obtain affiliate approval 
of its new pattern of operation 
CBS Radio scored an unusual 
sales coup for these times. 

It signed up Kellogg Burnett for a 
weekly expenditure of $20,000 for 
52 weeks. (Kellogg has been out of 
network radio since May 1957.) 

Come 1 January NBC Radio will 
for the first time operate on a sched- 
ule minus of dramatic shows available 
for national sponsorship. 

The regular schedule, as indicated 
in 17 October sponsor-scope, will be 
limited to news, informational and 
public-service programs, and Moni- 
tor and Image series. 

The dramatic and other program- 
ing will be available to affiliates on a 
fee basis. ^ 

The three tv networks will receive 
weekly Nielsen 24-market tv rat- 
ings for the new season. 

These new, speeded-up multi-mar- 
ket ratings, will be delivered six days 
after the last reported telecast. 

The 24-Market Ratings report on 
an area of equal network opportunity 
representing 40% of all U. S. homes. 
The reports function as a supplement 
to the basic National NTI reports. 

Network Radio business: Ladies 
Home Journal (BBDO) for $12,000 
worth of participations on CBS Radio, 
27-28 October. 

New network affiliations: Four 
stations joined Mutual this week- 
WJET, Erie; WNOW, York, Pa.; 
WKYR, Cumberland, Md. and 
WMNF, Richmond, Va. 

R. J. Reynolds ranked as the lead- 
ing network radio advertiser for| 
the four weeks ending 6 Septem- 
ber, according to Nielsen's Na- 
tional Radio Index. 

Ranked by total commercial min-l 
utes delivered for individual adver- 
tisers on all radio networks, here's! 
how the top 20 for the above period| 
compare: 

TOTAL COM. 
MIN. DEL, 
RANK ADVERTISER (000) 

1 R. J. Reynolds 73,847| 

2 Time 66,48S 

3 Lewis Howe 45,101 



72 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



4 


Midas 


42,376 


5 


Chevrolet 


37.694 


6 


General Foods 


34,595 


7 


Wm. Wrigley 


34,422 


8 


Armour 


34.074 


9 


United Motors 


31,890 


10 


Ex-Lax 


31,349 


11 


Tyrex 


29,413 


12 


A. E. Staley 


28,804 


13 


Bristol-Myers 


27,471 


14 


Carter 


26,382 


15 


Hudson Vitamin 


26,253 


16 


Amer. Motors 


23.999 


17 


AT&T 


23,529 


18 


Firestone 


21,961 


19 


Liggett & Myers 


21,254 


20 


CBS Electronics 


19,931 



Network personnel moves: Nor- 
man Felton, named general pro- 
gram executive, CBS TV, Hollywood 
. . . Robert Hoag, to assistant pro- 
gram director, administration, CBS 
TV, Hollywood . . . Elliott Henry, 
Jr., to director of press information 
for ABC TV's western division in 
Hollywood; James Ascher replaces 
him as director of advertising, pro- 
motion and press information for 
ABC's central division and for 
WBKB, Chicago. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



CBS TV Spot Sales this week 
released a brochure, dubbed 
"Cume-Finder" presenting facts 
and figures about spot tv to cli- 
ents and agencies. 

The "Cume-Finder" details the im- 
pact of various spot tv campaigns, 
for daytime and nightime schedules 
in 15 to 75 markets. The primary fac- 
tors covered are cost, coverage, un- 
duplicated audietice and frequency 
of exposure. 

Another release: The first TvAR 
Brand Comparison Study reveals 
that hair shampoo and cigarette ad- 
vertisers find greatest receptivity 
among women between 18 and 34. 

The study, representing brand in- 
formation from the five WBC mar- 
kets, shows that tlaytime tv is the 
ideal time for selling cigarettes 
to women, for it attracts the young 
housewife who also represents the 
prime cigarette market. 

These TvAR Brand Comparison 
Studies will be conducted semi-an- 
nually for each of the product cate- 
gories, in association with Pulse. 



ASSOCIATIONS 



NAB last week held the first of 
eight regional meetings, starting 
in Washington. 

Some of the highlights: 

• Louis Hausman, director of 
the newly-formed Tv Information Of- 
fice of NAB. outlined a "four-point 
approach" to the tv industry's new 
information program:" (1) admit 
when things are wrong. (2) correct 
them, (3) inform all the public and 
(4) actively defend the integrity and 
quality of all the things the industry 
does for our country and its people." 

• Harokl Fellows, NAB presi- 
dent, reported that the Bureau is 
prepared to set up additional safe- 
guards in the Tv Code, if necessary, 
to prevent "rigging" of tv quiz pro- 
grams. Donald McGannon, chairman 
of the TvCode Review Board, con- 
firmed this by stating his plans to 
propose change in Code at the next 
Board meeting. 

• Charles Tower, manager of 
the NAB department of broadcast 
personnel and economics revealed sta- 
tistics proving that while the number 
of radio stations in the past 13 years 
has increased 245 /{ . only the revenues 
serving the very largest, and smallest, 
markets have increased. 

• Chet Thomas, chairman of the 
NAB's AM Radio committee urged all 
broadcasters to devote major effort in 
their own communities to gain better 
public understanding of radio's vital 
service as a mass communications 
medium. 

• George Huntington, v.p. and 
general manager of TvB noted that 
the tv industry can learn a lesson 
from its own best customer — P&G. 
P&G last year, had sales of more than 
one and one-quarter billion dollars 
and of its advertising budget, 85.7% 
went into tv. ^ 

They were elected : Herbert Krue- 
ger, v.p. of WTAG, Worcester, to 
president of the Mass. Broadcasters 
Association . . . Bruce Dennis, pro- 
gram manager, WGN, Chicago, to 
president of the Illinois Broadcasters 
Association . . . Gregg Murphy. 
manager of the Katz Agency's Atlanta 
office, to president of the Atlanta 
Radio and Tv Station Representa- 
tives Association . . . Rosser Reeves, 
chairman of the board of Ted Bates, 
to the board of directors of AFA. ^ 



GIANT 



MARKET 



WSARS.HEAD • SPARTANBURG j 

' "GREENVILLE i 




"Ihe Giant 

of 

Southern 

Sfcics" 



GIVES YOU ALL THREE . . . 

GREENVILLE 

SPARTANBURG 
ASHEVILLE 

. . . with total coverage area 
greater than that of Miami, 
Jacksonville, Birmingham or 
New Orleans mml'^^^ 



82-County Data (within the TOO 
UV/M contour) S. M. Survey May 
10, 1959 



POPULATION 2,946,600 

INCOMES $3,584,180,000 

RETAIL SALES . . . $2,387,606,000 
HOUSEHOLDS 751,900 

Represented Nafionally by 
WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



CHANNEL 4 

WFBC-TV 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

NBC NETWORK 



RADIO AFFILIATE. "THE PIEDMONT GROUP" 
WFBC - GREENVILLE WORD - SPARTANBURG 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



73 



Check ixded 
J\Jgl (lefx^ 

y/]p^.-Maf '59} 



w. 



*and when you do, 
you'll discover why 
scores of national 
and regional adver- 
tisers have followed 
the trend to . . .WIST! 

These Two Reports 




will tell the practiced eye 
more in 10 minutes than we 
could tell you in pages and 
pages. 

Seeing is believing. Take 
a look — see for yourself! 
Your PGW Colonel will be 
glad to show you copies. 

tfiey'// fe// you wfi y . . . 

rrrm 

is the best radio buy 

in Charlotte 

A BROADCASTING COMPANY Of THE SOUTH STATION 



NBC SPOT SALES 

I Continued from page 29 ) 

low cost, high turnover product. 
Some of the panelists' conclusions: 
There's better recall with a 60 than 
a 20 in the higher cost item; better 
recall for a 20 than a 10 in the high 
turnover, lower cost product. 

NBC Spot Sales, reporting on these 
many timebuyer reactions, noted that 
the results "are not meant to be pro- 
jected to the total universe of several 
thousand persons engaged, directly or 
indirectly, in the purchase of broad- 
cast time. 

"They do, however, represent an 
interesting reflection of current opin- 
ions and practices among a very im- 
portant segment of the timebuying 
fraternity." The answers came from 
249 panelists, 37% of whom are em- 
ployed by agencies billing more than 
S5 million, 63% by those billing less 
than $5 million. 

Here are some of the more signifi- 
cant opinions expressed by buyers. 

Donald E. Leonard, media direc- 
tor. Fuller & Smith & Ross: "Length 
of commercial (in both radio and tv) 
is an area where the shrewd and 
creative media buyer can exhibit his 
knowledge of marketing, recall re- 
search, stretching budgets and force 
of advertising in distribution. 

"The proper application of the 
buyer's experience and savvy will 
often cause copy platforms to be de- 
signed to fit the specific length com- 
mercial he feels will accomplish the 
most for the client. There are a tre- 
mendous number of factors to be con- 
sidered to reach a length of commer- 
cial decision. And who is in a better 
position to weigh these factors than 
the veteran professional timebuyer?" 

Alice Ross, radio/tv timebuyer, 
Heineman, Kleinfeld, Shaw & Joseph, 
Neiv York: "The length of a tv com- 
mercial is not nearly as important as 
its creation and delivery. Some 10- 
second I.D.'s can be bores, Avhile a 
one-minute would hold the viewer's 
interest almost as well as if it were 
a short, short story. The creativity 
behind a commercial is the most 
important element — not its length. 
Where I.D.'s and 20's are to be used 
because of time desirability, creativity 
of commercial becomes even more 
important." 

Frank Mahon, media supervisor, 
William Esty, New York: "I firmly 
believe that the initiation of 30-sec- 



ond spots would improve television 
and would create a much better 
climate for selling. The current 20- 
second/10-second setup gives the ap- 
pearance of a subway rush, with 
everyone rushing to get on before the 
doors (best program) close. Addi- 
tionally, the plea for 60 seconds in 
prime time would be partially an- 
swered with the 30-second spot." 

Jacquelin M. Molinaro, media 
director. Cole, Fischer, Rogow, Bev- 
erly HiUs, Calif.: "Biggest headache 
is educating account men that 60- 
second spots are not sold between net- 
work programs ! More thought should 
be applied to the planning stage . . . 
on the use of 60's or 20's." 

Thomas L. Spengler, radio/tv 
director, Godwin Adv., Jackson, 
Miss.: "The 90-second commercial is 
an interesting length to work with, 
and tv stations could make a great 
effort to sell it where such a length is 
no hindrance to their programing 
. . . inside feature film programs. " 

R. A. Gilbert, director of media, 
W. E. Long & Co., Chicago: "I'd like 
to see the lO's and 20's abolished and 
15's and 30's used. The added time 
would make for more efficient short 
length spots." ^ 



MUSIC POLL 

[Continued from page 33) 

fortieth place worth one point. The 
KING store survey, because of its 
indication of local popularity, was 
weighted 80 points for first place, 
78 points for second, 76 for third, 
down to two points for fortieth. 
Points were totaled and the master 
survey music list was determined by 
the 40 tunes earning the most points 
included in the top 40. 

• Music panel. A three-member 
panel decided what records would be 
included in each category. Panel con- 
sisted of the station's program direc- 
tor. Bill Clark, its music supervisor 
and a staff announcer. Top 40 rec- 
ords (for Categories I and II) were 
auditioned by this panel; to be in- 
cluded, a record required a unani- 
mous vote by secret written ballot. 
For Categories III and IV, the music 
supervisor selected two tunes from 
each of 100 popular music albums; 
again, a unanimous vote was re- 
quired. For Category V, the panel 
selected by unanimous vote 20 Gold- 
en (or million-seller) records, ex- 
cluding heavy beat rock 'n' roll. 



74 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



• Method of presentation. Each 
survey broadcast was made by means 
of pre-recorded tape to insure mini- 
mal variance in presentation tech- 
nique. All broadcasts opened with a 
distinctive sound indicating that 

! another survey was about to take 
place. The same announcer explained 
ground rules each time, and portions 
of 10 unidentified tunes were played. 
Then ten 30-second selections repre- 
sented two selections apiece from each 
of the five categories. The rating 
card had a five-scale preference. 

• Key word. To prevent respon- 
dents from marking the preference 
card without actually taking part in 
the survey, the announcer gave a key 
word for each 30-second portion of 
music. This key word had to be 
written down by the respondent. At 
the opening and close of each broad- 
cast, the announcer gave a survey 
number which the respondent also 
wrote down to establish when his 
card was marked. 

• Samplinii technique. All per- 
sons over 12 \ears of age in Seattle 
and 15 adjacent counties were con- 
sidered members of the polling uni- 
verse. Addressing of the 100.000 
cards was done from telephone books. 
One-third of the addresses from each 
book were selected by masking the 
columns at the one-third point. 

• Sub-sampling. To discover how. 
if at all, the non-respondent's musical 
preferences differed from those of 
the respondents, a sub-sampling of 
5,000 was made. One-twentieth of 
all columns were marked in green 
(5,000) by the Mail Advertising 
Bureau (the Seattle firm handling 
the mailing). These 5,000 respon- 
dents received a green card. Non- 
respondents to the green card were 
sent a red card. When both green 
and red cards were tabulated against 
the survey findings, no significant 
differences were discovered. 

The KING-IBM study was con- 
ducted under the guidance of Dr. 
Stuart Carter Dood. director of the 
Washington Public Opinion Labora- 
tory of the University of Washington. 
Copies of the study will be given to 
the Roper Research Center and Wash- 

Iington Public Opinion Laboratory. 
Meanwhile, according to King 
Broadcasting Co. v. p. Otto Brandt, 
programing revisions based on the 
survey findings are already under- 
way at KING. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

[Continued from page 63) 

certainly one of the biggest setups for 
reflected light photography of chrome 
appliances in the East. We call it 
"The Big Tent" and it is exactly this: 
a specially made white oblong tent 



Photographing 
chrome appli- 
ances with 
natural lustre 



some 20 feet long by 15 feet wide by 
15 feet high, which is suspended by 
tabs from a framework of battens and 
can enclose a complete wall of a 
kitchen set along with the appliances 
to be photographed. 

The purpose of this tent is to re- 
flect nothing but an even white back- 
ground on the curved surfaces of a 
mirrorlike metallic appliance within. 
By this method, coffee pots, skillets, 
steam irons, toasters, etc., can be 
photographed in the surroundings of 




normal usage, retaining the natural 
lustre other lighting disallows. 

As is generally known, when a 
light is directed toward the curved 
surface of a highly polished coffee 
pot, you see not only the reflection of 
the light but a myriad of kicks which 
flare uncontrollably, and the result is 
a totally unacceptable photographic 
image. Reflected light, however, will 
give a soft, beautiful result. Now, it 
is fairly common practice, when an 
appliance is small enough, to bounce 
light off the surface of white card- 
board, and this provides a sufficiently 
even source of reflected illumination 
to photograph a still object. 

Or, if more than one item is to be 
shot, such as a toaster and a coffee 
pot under a Christmas tree, redirected 
light through a draped strip of para- 
chute silk may suffice. 

But Young & Rubicam wanted 
more than this for the G.E. Small 
Appliance account. They wanted all 
the advantages of reflected light pho- 
tography of multi-shaped appliances 
05 they are used in the home. So, 
WCD worked on the problem and 
came up with the tent idea. ^ 



DETROIT? PITTSBURGH? 
NEWARK? 










^^j^^-^ 





^ . JS.i«k^'< -as:!*':'*Jt:ii«'--«iB-: 



NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520,100 Drug Sales 

Households 423,600 

Consumer Spendable Income 

$1,761,169,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 



Automotive Sales 
General Merchandise 
Total Retail Sales 



$ 40,355,000 
$ 299.539,000 
$ 148,789.000 
$1,286,255,000 



KNOE-TV AVERAGES 78.5% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to April 1959 ARB we average 78.5°o share of audience from Sign On 

to Sign Off 7 days a week. During 361 weekly quarter hours it runs £0°o to 

100°o, and for 278 weekly quarter hours 92°o to 100°o. 



KNOE-TV 



CBS • A B C 
A James A. Noe Station 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



Channel 8 Represented by 

Monroe, Louisiana H-R Television, Inc. 

I'hnlo: The Cro.isett Cinx iiiin!/--proihirfix of liimhrr. pni>er, chetijir,il.i ,nid chiircoal- 
(^rossett, ArkanstLs. 




GROCERY SALES 



MOVE ON AIR . . . 

in the DOLLAR-RICH 
CHANNEL 5 Viewing 
AIR-eal 



More than 300 mil- 
lion dollars a year 
are spent for food in 
the 2,232 food stores 
operating in the 25- 
county cir-ea served 
byWNEM-TVIArich 
and abundant mar- 
ket served exclusive- 
ly by Channel 5. 



EASTERN MICHIGAN'S FIRST 
VHF TELEVISION STATION 




WNEM-TV 






76 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 





George C. Lindsay has been named Cen- 
tral Division director of TvB, and is head- 
quartering in Chicago. He was formerly 
v.p. and sales manager in charge of Chicago 
operations for Weed Tv. He joined that 
station representative firm in 1953. Prior 
to this, Lindsay was an account executive 
with Erwin Wasey & Co. He had held 
similar posts with KSTP-TV, Minneapolis- 
St. Paul and Edward Petry & Co. Lindsay was graduated from Wa- 
bash College and served with the Air Force during World War IL 

F. Winslow Stetson, Jr., has been ap- 
pointed v.p. and marketing director of C. J. 
LaRoche & Co. He was. most recently, v.p. 
and management representative, and a direc- 
tor of Needham, Louis & Brorby. Pursuing 
a career which started at Filene s in Boston. 
Stetson rose to advertising manager of 
Swift & Co., Associated New England plants. 
In 1948 he joined FC&B, Chicago, and 
in 1950, was transferred to their New York office as v.p. and account 
supervisor. He later joined Bryan Houston in the same capacity. 

Ken Johnson joins WNBQ, Chicago, as 
sales manager. He is presently an NBC TV 
Spot Sales representative in San Francisco. 
Johnson entered the NBC Network in 1954 
as a salesman with KNBC, San Francisco. 
He was then transferred to NBC TV Spot 
Sales in Los Angeles, returning later to 
the San Francisco spot sales office. In his 
new post. Johnson will report to William 
Decker, director of sales for the tv station. Johnson, with the 
11th Airborne Division during W.W. II. was stationed in Japan, 

Robert J. Walton, farm radio specialist 
at John Blair & Co.. Chicago and v.p. of 
the Chicago area Agricultural Advertising 
Association, will head the association's 
committee in charge of arrangements for 
their meeting with NATRFD. to promote 
mutual understanding. The Ag Club, com- 
posed of 75 agency and media members, 
will entertain the farm directors 30 No- 
vember at "work shops' so that, according to Walton, "the agri- 
culture advertisers can meet the farm directors and learn from them." 

SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 





FAMOUS MEASURING INSTRUMENTS: 3 




The 
standard 

by 
which 
others 

are 
judged 





his is the 30-pound "atomic 

^r \ clock" and its inventor, 

I J Dr. Harold Lyons, Hughes 

Aircraft Company scientist, 
for the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration ... a dock that will neither 
gain nor lose one second in a thousand years. 
In a space satellite in orbit, this clock will 
transmit rapid oscillations to be compared 
with time shown by a "master" clock on 
the Earth. Such a comparison will offer 
history's most searching check of the 
Einstein theory (that time in space, in 
speed-of-light movement) is slower than 
time on Earth. It will also offer precise 
measurements of the geometric shape of the 
Earth, and investigate whether space is the 
same in all directions, as well as measuring 
the velocity of light and radio waves. 

Compared with the complexity of 
this kind of thing, the measuring of mass 
audiences in television seems simple. It isn't, 
but American Research Bureau, pioneer in 
the field, is regarded as the ultimate in 
precision (within its own strictly defined 
limits). While sampling in itself can only 
approach absolute accuracy, the means by 
which data is gathered and processed can 
be refined to a high degree of precision. Two 
striking innovations by ARB forged the 
way for electronic accuracy in television 
research . . . instantaneous electronic audi- 
ence measurement by ARB's own ARBI- 
TRON, and the introduction of Remington- 
Rand's newest UNI VAC® SS90 high speed 
data processor to television research. 
Matching the painstaking efforts employed 
by ARB in sampling procedure, these 
atomic-age instruments assure ARB clients 
of results that are unsurpassed in . . . 

Accuracy . . . Reliability . . . 
Believability 



AMERICAN 
RESEARCH 
BUREAU, INC. 




WASHINGTON 



NEW YORK 
LOS ANGELES 



CHICAGO 



SPONSOR • 24 OCTOBER 1959 



77 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 




The seller's viewpoint 



Should radio discard all per broadcast ratings? Here's a provocative proposal 
from an important New York City station man, Ben Hoberman. general manager, 
WABC. According to Hoberman, the picture of radio given by present research 
methods is cockeyed — "We're just kidding ourselves." He advocates measure- 
ments of cume audiences only, plus more qualitative research. Do you agree? 
We'll be interested in hearing agency and advertiser reactions to this, the fifth 
in sponsor's neiv series, "The Seller's Viewpoint." Send us your comments. 



WeVe selling one thing delivering another 




wW hen will the research companies discontinue per 
broadcast ratings and instead measure what radio 
actually delivers? 

It seems to me that radio research is one area 
where there is a tremendous amount of misunder- 
standing. 

It's generally agreed among buyers and sellers of 
radio time that one of radio's biggest assets is its 
ability to reach a tremendous number of different 
homes regularly and often for a relatively small 
amount of money. Radio's saturation advertisers are 
buying radio today to take advantage of each sta- 
tion's over-all reach in its market. 

Yet, the rating companies continue to place the 
emphasis on the audience reached during a given 
quarter or half hour. As long as they continue to 
stress quarter-and half-hour segments, and purchases 
are made on the basis of these measurements, I 
think that we are doing a great injustice to ourselves. 
Not only that, I think we are just kidding ourselves. 
This places us in the position of selling one thing 
and delivering another. 

We shall cease playing games with each other, 
stop kidding ourselves and deliver to an advertiser 
what he rightfully should be buying radio for, when 
the rating companies cease emphasizing quarter-and 



half-hour ratings and start measuring as a standard 
a station's total cume. I suggest it be done in three 
hour segments: 6-9 a.m., 9 a.m. -12 noon, 12 noon-3 
p.m., etc. 

Radio has been most fortunate in quickly finding 
its niche in today's marketing and advertising arena 
despite the advent of new competitive media. We 
admittedly have one of the, if not the best media 
buys in advertising, yet we continue to allow our- 
selA'es to be short-changed by inadequate research. 

It is more important now than it ever has been to 
perform qualitative analyses of our listeners, rather 
than quantitative. Let's, as a matter of policy, show 
an advertiser who is listening, how old he or she is, 
his or her preferences, etc. I've always remembered | 
one thing that I learned in the early days of broad- 
casting, namely, that a bullet perfectly aimed is far 
more effective than a mess of buckshot. 

In these days of serious self-analysis and objective 
reflections, I fail to understand why the industry and 
rating companies have not taken the bull by the 
horns, so that a new standard of radio measurement 
can be established and adopted. As soon as this is 
done, radio listenership can be properly measured, 
sold and delivered the way it should be. As far as I 
am concerned, this can't happen too soon. ^ 



78 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 




PHILADELPHIA 



WELCOMES . . , 



FOR ITS 4th ANHUAl CONVENTIONl NOV. 1-4 WARWICK HOTEL 



The Broadcasters' Promotion Association has planned 
an unusually fine get-together for 1959! Our conven- 
tion "call letters" are C-O-M-E! 

There'll be more sound and practical promotional 
ideas unveiled than you can shake a rate card at. We 
also want to hear what new marvels of merchandising 



you have in motion on behalf of your channel or 
frequency! If you're interested in the broadcast adver- 
tising, promotion or publicity field, the convention is a 
must for you! This year, there's an extra feature to the 
affair: a few days of fabulous Indian Summer in 
Philadelphia! 




BE SURE TO CLIP THIS COUPON 



Mr. William Pierson 
Broadcasters' Promotion Ass'n. 
190 North State Street 
Chicago 1, Illinois 

Dear Bill; 

Yes, indeed! I plan to attend the 4th AnnuQl BPA Convention in Philadelphia. 

My check in the amount of $ is enclosed. I'll follow-through on my 

hotel reservation. 



NAME- 



ADDRESS. 
CITY 



-STATE- 



BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION, INC. 



Sfofe-lofce Building 
Chicogo 1, III 



190 North Slate Street 
ANdover 3-0800 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 



T) 



SPONSOR 



Tv from the sky 

The announcement last week that the Ford Foundation is 
sponsoring a $7 million experiment in "airborne educational 
tv" leaves us gasping for breath. 

According to plans, a DC-7 plane, flying a tight circle over 
Ft. Wayne, Ind., will shower down education programs over 
parts of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Wis- 
consin. 

An estimated 13,000 schools and colleges, and 5 million 
viewers within a circle 400 miles in diameter, will be able 
to pick up the uhf signal. 

While we applaud the use of tv in education, we're a little 
alarmed at the principle of airborne tv telecasting. An exten- 
sion of this idea into the commercial field would play havoc 
with our whole tv system. 

Let's be sure that this "tv from the sky" is strictly limited 
to legitimate educational purposes. 

Newspaper applauds tv 

While we're speaking of educational tv, our hat is off to the 
Cincinnati Enquirer for a recent editorial on the subject. Too 
often newspapers are content to criticize the air media. But 
the Enquirer says frankly, "a professor can do a more effec- 
tive job if he calls on teacher aids like radio and tv." 

Visit the U.S.A. in I960 

We're indebted to McCann-Erickson's Brussels office for 
hearing about an unusual Belgian publishing enterprise. W. 
H. Scott, (at McC-E's suggestion) writes to tell us that his 
paper ''Uecho de la Bourse" Belgium's leading financial 
daily, will publish a special supplement early next year. 

Subject of the supplement: "Visit the U.S.A. in 1960." 
Mr. Scott's address is 47 Rue du Houblon 47, Brussels 1, 
and he's gratefully accepting advertising orders for his un- 
usual international project. 

Our congratulations to an imaginative and enterprising 

guy. 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR: To convince every 
national advertiser that radio has a place in 
the American home that no other medium, in- 
cluding television, can ever usurp. Radio sell- 
ing is personal, local and community-oriented. 



80 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

You tell 'em: Reply from a station 
manager to a SPONSOR questionnaire 
on what stations expect from reps — 
"They could do themselves and the 
industry good by telling us what we 
ought to know when we don't know 
what we ought to know even though 
we know that we don't know what we 
ought to know." Move over, Gertrude 
Stein! 

Credit where due: Larry Wolters, 
tv/radio critic for the Chicago Trib- 
une, was honored at a luncheon the 
other day thrown by ABC, CBS, NBC 
outlets in Chicago and WON, Inc. 
Occasion was Wolters' 30th year with 
the Trib, and he answered plaudits 
of broadcasters thus: "The real credit 
goes to my wife. During all these 
years that she and I have dined in 
front of radio or tv sets, she never 
once served me a tv dinner." 

Capsule synopsis: From tv log of 
the Los Angeles Times— 9 MOVIE— 
"King Kong." Fay Wray . . . Over- 
grown monkey terrorizes big city. 

Definition: A "Sports Fan" is a 67- 
year-old man who spends all day put- 
ting up screens, digging in the garden 
and wrestling with his grandchildren, 
who then settles down to watch the 
baseball game on tv and becomes over- 
awed with admiration for a 34-year- 
old "veteran" outfielder who takes 
two steps to the right to catch a pop 
fly.— Don Davis, WMCA, N. Y. C. 

First things first: Tv Guide reports 
that in London, when a fire swept 
through an enginehouse, firemen left 
two fire engines and other valuable 
equipment burning, saved the tv set. 
Jolly ivell done! 

Kookie: From Paul Molloy's column 
in the Chicago Sun-Times, this re- 
vealing letter from the Edd (Kookie) 
Byrnes Fan Club of Chicago — "Re- 
guarding to what you wrote about 
Edd Byrnes you should be ashamed 
. . . You are dum . . . You are jealous 
because you don't have all the fame 
he dose . . . And know our whole club 
thinks you are a creep. Signed 
(names omitted for charitable reas- 
ons) : President — . Secratary — . Tres- 
ure — ." Replied Molloy, "Kookie, 
Kookie, loan me your speller." 



SPONSOR 



24 OCTOBER 1959 




LLARS 



An independent survey shows 76% of 
WTOP Radio listeners in income groups 
over $6,000 per year. Add to this 
WTOP's record of earning more quarter- 
hour wins in the 20-county Pulse than 
all the other stations combined and 
it becomes obvious : the important 
station is WTOP Radio! 



iu 



WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



trated by THE WASHINGTON POST BROADCAST DIVISION 



n-OP Radio. Washington. D. C. 



WTOP'TV channel 9,Washington. D. C. 



WJXT channel 4 ^Jacksonville, Florida 



NOW. . . more good music on WDOK! 







Radio — as WDOK plays it 



There's good news to tell you and so much more 
good music to share, too. 

By rearranging our schedule of commercial an- 
nouncements between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, 
WDOK now presents even more good music pro- 
gramming. 

This means more good music for the adult listener 
in Northern Ohio, and better service for all clients. 



Yes, WDOK is broadcasting even more heavenly 
music. This is another indication of our earnest 
desire to bring the very best in radio entertainment; 1 
to our listeners and to help clients get better results 
through good programs. 

Good programming goes hand in hand with good 
advertising on WDOK — Cleveland's better musiJ 
station. | 



WDOK and you — that's harmony! 



WDOK 



FREDERICK WOLF, GENERAL MANAGER 

THE CIVIC BROADCASTERS, INC. 

1515 EUCLID AVENUE, CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Represented nationally by Broadcast Times Sales, Inl 



31 OCTOBER 19S9 
40< a copy • $8 a yaar 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




INSTANT 
RATINGS ARE 
ON THE WAY! 




«! 



Latest Nielsen expan 
sion program unveiled 
this week offers new 
radio/tv research tools 

Page 27 



Why media men 
are still 
underpaid 

Page 30 



Promotion needs 
some lessons 
from advertising 

Page 37 



New tv shows 
not up to par: 
Tv Basics 

Page 39 



N PAGE 



I 



[ilMam V.Stewart, President ADarenF.McGavr en Co rp.Representatives 




MOST CAPABLE HANDS FC 



1. EXPERIENCED CAMERAMEN 



2. TECHNICAL CREATIVITY 



At Videotape Center you will find the finest equip- 
ment and facilities for Videotape* production avail- 
able anywhere in the world. 

The advantages of starting with the right tools 
and the right plant are obvious. But it is still the 
men who use the equipment and hoiv they use it that 
make the big difference . . . and this is where Video- 



tape Center service can be invaluable to you. 

Here you will find a staff thoroughly experienced 
in every phase of the television medium, most of 
whom have "lived with" Videotape from its 
beginning. 

Here you will find the planning know-how, the 
technical skill, editing virtuosity, special effects 



There Are Two Types of TV Advertisers Today... Those Who Are Using Tape, 




ingenuity and meticulous handling that result in a 
Hiperior end-product — with all the economies that 
intelligent pre-planning and smooth production-flow 
make possible. 

Why not trust your next commercial production 
to the most capable hands of Videotape Center? 



I and Those Who Are About To 



VIDEOTAPE PRODUCTIONS OF NEW YORK, INC. 

205 West 58th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 2-3300 



Mark this market 
on your list! 

CENTRAL and 
SOUTH ALABAMA 

... one of 
Alabama's 
"BIG THREE" 



WSFA-' 




mosileJ 

WHY 

WSFA -TV 

IS DOMINANT 

IN CENTRAL 

AND SOUTH 

ALABAMA! 

WSFA-TV has the TOP SHOWS in 
an area of over one million population. 
The April '59 AEB survey proves the 
dominance of WSFA-TV . . . 

Top 10 Shows 

WSFA-TV 9 90% 

Station "C" I 10% 

Top I 5 Shows 

WSFA-TV 1 3 86% 

Station "C" 2 14% 

WSFA-TV placed five syndicated shows 
in the Top 30 while Station "C" placed 
none in the Top 50. A further indica- 
tion of WSFA-TV 's acceptance. 

OVER A MILLION VIEWERS IN 
35 ALABAMA COUNTIES* 

Population 1,106,000 
Effective Buying Income.— $1,201,510,000 

Retail Sales . 799,440,000 

Food Store Sales 217,402,000 

Drug Store Sales 23,964,000 

Automotive Sales 157,280,000 

Gasoline Service Station Sales 74,867,000 

Mark Central and South Alabama on 
your list . . . buy it with WSFA-TV! 

* Market area defined by Television Magazine, plus 6 
counties consistently proving regular reception. Does 
not include 3 Georgia and 3 Florida bonus counties. 

(Data from Sales Management Survey of Buying Power) 

WSFA-TV 

MONTGOMERY 

Channel 12 NBC/ABC 

THE BROADCASTING COMPANY OF THE SOUTH 

WIS-TV, Columbia, South Carolina 

Itrfirescntcd hv Ihr Katz Agi-ncy 



© Vol. 13, No. 44 • 31 OCTOBER 1959 

:~M^ E3I m m ^k.1 C^ J'""%k HBjb 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

New research tools for radio/tv 

27 Expansion of the Nielsen rating service is announced this week: Instant 
N.Y.C. ratings, more tv markets, first Canadian NCS, radio in 1960 NCS 

Media men — they're still underpaid 

30 SPONSOR survey shows agency media people moving upward in salaries 
and responsibility, but still tagging behind creative, account people 

What Macy isn't telling Cimbel 

32 Here's how the N.Y. department store became a .52-week tv advertiser, 
what techniques proved successful in its 18-month tv experiments 

Mennen gets surprise dividends from radio 

33 Response to spot radio campaign "unexpected and gratifying," says Bill 
Mennen Jr., citing sales force enthusiasm and station contest entries 

Does promotion need more ad savvy? 

34 Today's audience promotion suffers from lack of research and planning 
says Herman Land; suggests promotion men use modern techniques 

Gas company runs radio marathons 

36 St. Louis utility finds proper image builder in 12-hour, single-station 
saturations; advance buildup, few commercials bring big response 

How to pre-sell radio/tv 

37 Psrt Three of this sponsor series on how to excite your sales staff and 
dealers on an air campaign, lists more examples of how it is done 

New tv shows at a glance: below par 

39 Nielsen's new speeded-up 24-market report covering share of audience 
shows westerns, varieties holding up; suspense down. Also, tv basics 



FEATURES 

54 Film-Scope 

24 49th and Madison 

S8 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

58 Picture Wrap-Up 

70 Seller's Viewpoint 

SO Sponsor Asks 

lO Sponsor Backstage 



56 Sponsor Hears 

17 Sponsor-Scope 

72 Sponsor Speaks 

48 Spot Buys 

72 Ten-Second Spots 

23 Timebuyers at Work 

68 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

53 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49fh St. (49 & Madison) New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11. 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekh 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 

^1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




. . . with its quick rise to the top of Cleveland radio. But there's no getting away from what happened: 
In January of this year we were dead last. 
In February new management took over . . . and this summer 
we took over first place among all Cleveland radio stations. 
Current all-day average: 24.5%* 
We know how it is, when the buys which once gave peace-of-mind start 
ulcerating. So now that we're the buy that brings tranquility, we promise 

to keep your anxiety at a minimum. One way is to stay first, which we aim 
to do by continuing to provide— and to improve— the new kind of radio service 

we brought to Cleveland. Another way is to let you talk to Harvey Glascock 
(Express 1-5000). He gives you a feeling of stability. Or, we'll send 
somebody from Blair, to .sell you some comfort. 
*Hooper. Aug.— Sept., 7 a.m.— 6 p.m. Mon.—Fri. 



WNEW 

NEW YORK CITY 
AM-FM 


WNEW 

NEW YORK CITY 
TV 




WTTG 

WASHINGTON, 0. C 
TV 


SPONSOR • 31 


OCTOBER 19.59 



THE NEW 



V\^HK 



the new .sound and the 
new sell of radio . . . in 

CLEVELAND 

5000 EUCLID AVE. • TELEPHONE; EXPRESS 1-5000 

HARVKY L. GLASCOCK 

\'ici' Prc.siilviii A (icneral Manager 
JOHN BI-AIR 

/ V(7/(A/H' \tiiioiuil Hepresenliilive 



DIVISION OF METROPOLITAN BROAOCASTING CORPORATION 



^ 




lo FMa... 



■«■• 



There's lAf J JCTin Jacksonville, the run-away 
favorite no matter how you look at it! WJXT blankets Q^ 

counties in Northeast Florida and South Georgia, more than 
double the 28 counties reached by the other station. Add to this 
the August Nielsen ratings showing WJXT dehvering twice 
as many television homes between 6 p.m. and midnight. 

No matter how you measure it, your advertising reaches more, 
many more television homes on WJXT. 



WUXT ^^ 



® 



JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA 

Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 



OprraU'd by The Washington Potil Brwidcast Division: 

W%JXT Channel 4, JacksonviUe. Flond<i \A^TOP Radio Washington, D.C. >A/TOP-TV Channel 9. Washington. L 




'm$iiimmmmmmm0m^^ 




SWEET SUCCESS 
adds the measurement of 
success that helps you 
get low cost-per-thousand 
sales. ..a unique format 
that provides the ideal 
climate for your 
sales message. 

Created and produced by 
Jack Doug/as, three-time 
Emmy Award winner. 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



488 MADISON AVE. • N.Y. 22 • PL 5-2100 




I 



><- 



EWSMAKER 
of the iveek 



This week, a leading cigarette company changed presidents. 
Retiring is a man who channeled his company's advertising 
into air media and tvas a leading force among industry fig- 
ures who made tobacco dominant in air media. His successor 
inherits a spot and network tradition dating back to the '30^ s. 

The newsmaker: William A. Blount, who came to Liggett 
& Myers out of college in 1923, this week became president of the 
$.550 million-volume company. He succeeds Benjamin F. Few, who 
retires after 43 years with Liggett & Myers. 

Blount assumes the mantle of a man who, along with George 
Washington Hill and other tobacco industry figures, in a large meas- 
ure, tied the destiny of the cigarette industry to air media in the 
early '30's. In an effort to get 
strong identification for his low- 
keyed advertising theme, "They 
Satisfy," Few featured Ruth Etting 
and other reigning favorites of the 
day on Chesterfield's musical- 
variety shows of the early '30's. 
At the same time, he was experi- 
menting with spot radio patterns 
around the country to bolster weak 
markets. As an offshoot of this, 
he began experimenting with the 
first musical jingles for cigarettes. 

Resisting the hard-hitting repe- 
tition which became a hallmark of cigarette advertising in the late 
'30's and early '40's, Few maintained his low pressure advertising 
policies in the introduction of L&M Filters. Oasis followed and last 
month, the high-filtration Duke of Durham. 

Liggett & Myers ranked third among network tv advertisers in the 
first eight months of 1959, according to TvB gross billing figures; 
fifth among tv spot users. The eight-month network rankings: R. J. 
Reynolds, $10,798,123; P. Lorillard, $9,380,113; Liggett & Myers, 
$8,347,852; American Tobacco, $7,491,450; Brown & Williamson, 
$5,308,327. 

Spot tv rankings for the first six months of 1959: B&W, $4,167,- 
900; Lorillard, $2,460,100; Reynolds, $1,823,000; American, $1,703,- 
500; L&M, $1,663,200. Both network and spot expenditures so far 
in 1959 for L&M are way ahead of last year's totals, which were: spot 
tv, $1,865,830; net tv, $10,849,983. Spot radio (according to RAB), 
got $2,700,000 of the total $20,308,827 advertising nut. 

Over-all, tobacco industry expenditures in tv have risen sharply in 
'59 (network tv gross time billings were $50,468,726 through August 
as opposed to $38,408,891 for the same period in '.58). In this at- 
mosphere of upswing, Blount — a director of the company since 1941 
— assumes the presidency of Liggett & Myers. ^ 




William A. Blount 



4 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




F O XJ N" D 



.00 tra,v-elers witli $2,000 ea.cl& . . . 

ill it took was a little traveling music — 
»n "WMAQ. In this case, literally before 
>reakfast. Chicago's Olson Travel 
)rganization offered overseas tours at 
2,000 per ticket on its 40-niinute pro- 
.'ram of semi -classical music featuring 
>Tor man Ross, Saturdays, 7: 15 to 7: 55 a.m. 

NBC Owned • 



W M A O 



In four short weeks, Olson sold out com- 
pletely — 100 tickets for a gross sale of 
$200,000. And one year in advance! 
This is just one more example of how^ 
"WMAQ reaches the quality buying mar- 
ket in the Midw^est. It's every bit as easy 
for you to find the buyers you're looking 
for anytime , morning, noon or night, on... 

670 in Chicago • Sold by NBC Spot Sales 




I've got 
no beef 

[ j^ with 

^i/L San Francisco, 

Smidley. 

Sure, it takes a four-station network to do it 
. . . but there are more gas station sales in 
the Cascade market than in San Francisco, 
More food sales than in Toledo. Look at it an- 
other way, Smidley. The Cascade network is 
the only television reaching the entire market. 
A smart buy? It's a "must" buy in the Pacific 
Northwest. 





BHHH ■■■■■■■■ viv H ^'9///^ Hi ^9Mt^ H ^B 



KIMA-TV 
KBAS-TV 



YAKIMA. WASH. 



EPHDATA, 
MOSES LAKE, WASH 



PASCO. RICHIAND. 
KENNEWICK. WASH 



KEPR-TV 

|/| ryy jw iewiston, ida 



For Facts and figures: 

National Representotives; Pacific Northwest: 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY Company MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



SPONSOR 

THC WECMLV MAGAZINC TV ^ R A O I O AOVCRTISERS USE 

Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane PInlterton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 

Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Charles Eckert; 
Gilda Gomez 

SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



Another great market . . . 
and another great creative TV station for 

YOUNGPRESENTATION 

Effective November 1, 1959 

Young Television Corporation 

becomes exclusive national representative for 

W M B MM S MMM ^ ■Hi 

II \/ 
■Jk wJki wf 

JoLxlLiSI J^ J^ 4 

the powerful Sai^kes Tarzian Inc. station in 

IT\f TIT A T\I A P*OT jT^ 

(affiliated with WPTA-TV, Fort Wayne, Indiana— 

also represented by Young TV.) 



▲ 



YOUNG TELEVISION CORP. 

An Adam Young Company 

NEW YORK CHICAGO ST. LOUIS LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO DETROIT ATLANTA 

3 East 54th St. Prudential Plaza 915 Olive St. 6331 Hollywood Blvd. Ru.-^s BIdg. (Rm. 1207) 2940 Book BIdg. 11S2 W. Peachtree 

New York 22, N.Y. Chicago 1, III. St. Louis, Mo. Los Angeles 28. Calif. San Francisco 4. Calif. Detroit 25. Mich. Atlanta. Ga. 

PL 1-4848 Michigan 2-6190 MAin 1-5020 HOIIywood 2-2289 YUkon 6-6769 WOodward 3-6919 TRinity 3-2564 



SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 




of Mississippi 
Retail Sales . . . 

^918,000,000 

IN THE SOUTH'S 

FASTEST GROWING 

TV MARKET 

Jackson, Miss.^ 

with these Jackson 
stations 

WJTv 12 



KATZ 



WlbT 

HOLLINGBERY 
"^ Nation's business gains leader 

10 



by Joe Csida 



L 



sponsor 
backstage 



A new, cleaner face for tv? 




On this day 121 October I in this vear you V 
can hardly encounter a network man, an adver- 
tiser or agency executive without getting into a 
long discussion about the scandal of the rigged 
quiz shows. In the next several weeks I believe 
the somewhat panicky atmosphere will become 
a mite more so as such intellectual glamour boys 
as Charles Van Doren, and some of our more 
distinguished network officials submit to the questioning of the House 
Oversight Subcommittee and the enthusiastic coverage of the nation's 
drooling press. I do not mean to speak too lightly about the matter, 
nor to minimize its serious nature, for I surely agree that it may 
conceivably hurt television in many ways. But I also believe the 
situation may turn out, in the long run, to be the single development 
most responsible for making the medium bigger, better and stronger 
than it has ever been. 

Quiz mess good for the industry 

There is little doubt that the rigging practices of some of the 
shows, and the spectacular and extensive coverage given the story 
in the newspapers has shaken viewer confidence in television. How 
badly, and in what ways, this will hurt the medium is open to ques- 
tion. I doubt that any appreciable number of people will watch tv 
less than heretofore because of the quiz mess. However, such long- 
run and eminently successful shows as What's My Line could be 
more or less subtly hurt by the notion some viewers may develop 
that possibly Kilgallen or Cerf or Francis may have been given a 
small pre-program hint or two in their efforts to guess the occupa- 
tions of some of the guests. 

In an equally subtle, subconscious or conscious way certain types 
of commercials may lose a corisiderable portion of their effectiveness. 
When a beer maker claims, and shows, that his lager holds its head 
while other beers lose theirs, it's conceivable viewers may suspect the 
possibility of the glass having been gimmicked. Or when a cigarette 
advertiser throws the findings of a new test or survey at the customer, 
said customer may question the impartiality of the survey more than 
he did prior to the rig expose. 

But surely injuries of this nature to television are not too serious, 
nor likely to last too long. Programers will simply steer clear of a 
type of show in which any phase may be open to any kind of rigging. 
I'm sure this is the reason why Frank Stanton and CBS TV, for 
example, dropped Name That Tune and The Big Payoff. And wise 
advertisers and their agencies will merely dispense with campaigns 
based on tests, surveys, etc., which may be open to any question at all. 

The damage to the medium deriving from any future legislation 
prompted by the quiz mess may, of course, be considerably greater 
than a momentary loss of viewer respect. But somehow I do not 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



Another great market — 

and another great creative TV station for 

YOUNGPRESENTATION 

Effective October 19, 1959 

Young Television Corporation 

became exclusive national representative for " 



•2-. J*' 



KTVR 

CHANNEL 2 



the idea-a-minute television station in 



■:r< 









>^^ 



DENVER 



^m 












'."^^^i 



y. 



i'^i'h 



^t. 



•i-V 



^V* 



YOUNG TELEVISION CORP. 

An Adam Young Company ^~ 



NEW YORK 

3 East S4th St. 
New York 22, N. Y. 
PL 1-4B4B 



CHICAGO 

Prudential Plaza 
Chicago 1, III. 
Michigan 2-6190 



ST. LOUIS 

975 Olive St. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
MAin 1-5020 



LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

6331 Hollywood Blvd. Russ BIdg. (Km. 1207 J 

Los Angeles 28, Calif. San Francisco 4, Calif. 

Hollywood 2-2289 YUkon 6-6769 



DETROIT ATLANTA 

2940 Book BIdg. 1182 W. Peachtree 

Detroit 25. Mich. Altanta, 6a. 

woodward 3-6919 TRinity 3-2564 



SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



11 



• SPRINGFIELD 

• DECATUR 

• CHAMPAIGN-URBANA 

"^^e^ Mid Ame^Uca 
Jlloe4. ana /iiUfA, . . . 



// 




METROPOLITAN MARKET 



\ii3 



GRADE 




SPRINGFIELD 

WICS 







lOVER 230,000 TV FAMIL 
AVAILABILITIES: YOUNG TV 



. i 

i 





Hudson 

TISSUE 





FOR INFORMATION: 

COMMUNITY CLUB 

AWARDS 

20 E. 46 ST. 

NEW YORK 17 

MU 7-4466 






12 



Sponsor backstage continued 



believe that any of the unfair and restrictive bills now being, or 
about to be, introduced will actually become law. It is one thing 
for a handful of members of the Congress to have themselves a 
pulicity ball with one aspect or another of television, but it is quite 
another for a majority of the sober-minded members of the House 
and the Senate to vote certain kinds of proposed bills into law. The 
broadcasting business has, on too many occasions, proved itself a 
responsible, constructive force in the land to be improperly ham- 
strung because of a single situation like the rigged quizzes. 

Nevertheless, as I said, I believe the ultimate results of the whole 
fixed-shows situation will be beneficial to the industry. For one 
thing, some of the top echelon network brass, who have too long 
occupied themselves with matters other than programing are going 
to get back into the programing picture as they have never been in 
it before. Frank Stanton said plainly this week that he and CBS TV 
were fully aware that the network — and the net alone — was respon- 
sible for the shows that went on its air. CBS TV, alone, said Stanton, 
intends to decide not only what goes on the network but the manner 
in which it goes on. I'm certain that Bob Sarnoff and Leonard 
Goldenson and Ollie Treyz, too, will get back into and stay with the 
programing end to a far greater degree than ever before. 

More caution expected from webs 

Network control of shows is not necessarily, per se, a guarantee of 
superior, spotless programing. But when men of Stanton's caliber 
flatly take unto themselves the full fault for whatever hits those 
screens, you may lay reasonable odds that nothing too bad is likely 
to take place. At any rate, nothing as bad as some diddling with the 
dough on quiz programs. There's no question that the networks will, 
from time to time, meet a little opposition in what shows go on the 
air. The age-old tussle between the webs and the major advertisers 
and agencies is likely to flare quite brightly in the months immedi- 
ately ahead. But underlying every tussle will be the question of 
whether the show, or any part of it, may leave the web or the adver- 
tiser open to criticism on ethical and/or moral grounds. And surely 
in this area, the television industry can never be too cautious. 

The image of a television industry besmudged by the fixed quiz 
shows is not a pretty image, and no committee or body wants to, 
nor would be able to make it seem lovely and wholesome. In this 
light Lou Hausman's new job as head of the Television Information 
Office is a rough one. But, I feel that in the long view the beating 
the business is taking from the current situation will be most respon- 
sible for creating an industry situation in which the image of televi- 
sion is the cleanest possible. 

A star reborn 

I believe I criticized Frank Sinatra as severely as any other writer 
when he goofed his ABC TV series a season or two ago. He played 
that brace of shows, week after week, tired, weary, bored and dull. 
Now I hasten to say that the Timex show Frank did the other evening 
with Bing and Dean Martin was the best show I've seen him do in 
twenty years of observing him closely. He seemed relaxed, rested, 
cheerful, and full of that devastating super-confidence and charm, 
which no one in his field possesses quite to the same degree. I don't 
know what Frank did to come up so great again but I do hope he'll 
do it every time he plays tv. ^ | 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 19591 




M c . K E A N 



PI NNS\ I \ \\1 \ 



P () 1 ILK 

OCoudersport 



E I K 



for 

moving 

merchandise 

in Western ^ 

New York 

WBEN-TV is the BIG WHEEL 



Certainly we can talk quality programming and production, for as Western 
New York's first television station we have the experience and know-how since 
1948. But advertisers like to talk coverage and sales. No station in the area 
dominates this rich, productive market with perfect pictures and perfect sound 
as does WBEN-TV. Into Western New York, northwestern Pennsylvania and 
the Canadian Niagara Peninsula we consistently bring your message before the 
most people, most of the time. This moves merchandise, rolls up sales gains, 
levels sales resistance. To WBEN-TV buyers it's the greatest invention since 
the wheel. It takes them farther faster along the road to sales dominance. 
Contact us and learn how your TV dollars count for more on Ch. 4. 



Represented nationally by 
HARRINGTON, RIGHTER and PARSONS 

V/B E N-TV 

A SERVICE OF THE BUFFALO EVENING NEWS 



^ 



CH. 



CBS in Buffalo 




SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 19.59 



13 



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VISITING HOURS 

Sign-on to Sandman 



There are no restrictions on visiting hours when 
friends call by way of WBNS-TV. Her Channel Ten 
pals breast all barriers when a little lady beckons. 
It's mighty reassuring to see familiar faces like 
Captain Kangaroo and Flippo the Clown when 
you're a tiny bit scared and away from home. 

It doesn't take long to snip out tonsils these days 
so Susie will be back with her family tomorrow. 
However WBNS-TV will remain on duty in this and 
66 other hospitals within range of our 316 kw 
signal. 

We recognize that our obligation goes beyond 
bringing the world outside into this room. It also 
demands that we bring the needs of this room to the 
attention of the world outside. For example, the 
attractive girl by Susie's bed first learned about 
careers in nursing through a series of announce- 
ments and programs created by our energetic Public 
Service Department. Public service announcements 
during the first six months of our tenth year totaled 
5,529. Estimated air time value exceeded half a 
million dollars. 

WBNS-TV's good neighbor policy is part and 
parcel of being born and raised in Central Ohio. 
That's how it's been during our first decade and 
that's how it will continue. 

Each succeeding year seems to find our audience 
larger, warmer and more receptive. Small wonder 
advertising agency time buyers express themselves 
as follows: "// you ivant to be seen in Central Ohio 
— WBNS-TV". 

\A/BNS-TV 

CBS Television in Columbus, Ohio 



The nation's No. 1 TV test marhel station. 
Represented by Blair TV. 316 kw. 



» LO N e P 

Music 



Selling 
Time 



P LAY 



N ASH V I 



WSM-TV 

SUPERIORITY 
Series 

7. Sales Power 



' 




Few of the 260,000 registered dogs in WSM-TV 
coverage area actually keep track of WSM-TV 
program times. But — their masters do. And that 
means well over a million people to whom Channel 
4 has become a daily "open sesame" to information, 
education, entertainment. 

With the tallest tower in the area, WSM-TV offers 
instant and constant access to the largest TV 
audience in the Central South. And the Central 
South is one of America's most spectacular growth 
markets. This adds up to concentrated, highly effec- 
tive sales power in a market no advertiser can 
afford to overlook. Anyone for selling? 



lATSIvI 



Nashville, Tennessee 



Represented by 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc 



The Original Station Representative. 




OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE NATIONAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 
16 SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



31 OCTOBER 1959 

Copyright I9sa 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



It may wind up as not much more than a tactical maneuver, but General Foods 
18 scoutinjt ABC TV and NBC TV for spots into which to move its four CBS TV 
shows. 

Prompting tlie search: Resentment over the fact it expects to pay $600,000 more for 
time on CBS as a result of the network's new discount plan which goes into effect as 
of April 1960. 

General Foods feels that it's being discriminated against in two respects: (1) it's not 
getting a special summer discount a la strictly summer advertisers; (2) an adver- 
tiser with several hours of his own gets no advantage discount-wise over an alter- 
nate week advertiser. 

If GF does go through with a sweeping switch of network, or networks, it will be be- 
cause it is in the unusual position of controlling all its nighttime shows. 

Another major advertiser reported to be unhappy about what the new discount setup 
means to it is S. C. Johnson. 

Historical note: It will be recalled that General Foods in a similar huflf back in 
radio's heyday moved its business, boot and kaboodle, suddenly from NBC to CBS. 



Again, General Foods doesn't relish Frank Stanton's ukase against laughtracks. 

Nighttime programing-wise, GF is dedicated to the principle of mirth and any bar 
to nourishing it wouldn't, in the view of this sponsor, seem exactly cooperative. 

The GF users of laughtracks: Danny Thomas show, the Ann Sothern show, 
Hennessy and the Betty Hutton show. 

Some reps are recommending that the next time the SRA gets around to issu- 
ing plaques it ought to make a big point of honoring the William Esty agency. 

The reason: It's the model for other agencies to follow in this respect: a faithful 
user on a big scale of spot radio. 

Esty, these reps note, can be depended on year after year to channel millions of dollars 
into radio from such accounts as R. J. Reynolds, Leeming and National Carbon. It 
recently put Nescafe into over 40 radio markets on a 52-week basis. 

Other agencies cited as still up there as contributors to national spot radio are Grey, 
SSCB, BBDO, Ayer, JWT and DFS. Also Aitkin-Kynett (Fels). 

Among the leading agencies, rue the reps, that appear to have forgotten that radio exists 
are Young & Rubicam, Benton & Bowles, Compton and Bates. 



Agencynien who have been journeyina; to the tv show marts in HollyMOod say 
the networks have something besides malaise to be concerned about : the new ma- 
terial either in cans or in the planning isn't likely to prompt handsprings. 

The producing gentry out there give the impression of being in a state of suspended 
direction. They're not sure whether the western avalanche isn't headed for a sprin- 
kling of survivors or whether they haven't gone badly afoul in the detection genre bv 
trj'ing to turn out carbon copies of Peter Gunn. 

What this situation may spell for the networks, as envisioned bv these agencymen: 
Instead of figuring on replacements, the networks will concentrate on salvaging 
their present product by dint of closer episode-by-episode development in the studio. 



SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Here's an interesting case of the left hand not liking what the right hand has 
done which a rep encountered this week in pitching for a spot campaign. 

The offered chainbreak was adjacent to a show that the agency had recom- 
mended and sold to a client this season, and the timebuyer's retort was: 

"Look, the television department was silly enough to pick that turkey; now don^t 
ask us to put another client after it." 



Campbell-Ewald president Thomas B. Adams last week raised the spectre of tv 
network year-around advertisers demanding reduced summer rates unless the level 
of programing were raised. 

Thomas flayed the overwhelming use of film reruns and cited the fact that his own cli- 
ents do not use inferior talent in the summer. He said he felt assured that summer 
viewing doldrums would be dissipated if the networks put to work some teams of bright 
creative people. His rostrum : T he NAB meeting in Chicago. 

Incidentally, here's how the Chevrolet summer show, Campbell-Ewald's own, fared 
against the reruns on the opposite networks this summer, with Nielsen the source: 



NETWORK 


JUNE SHARE 


JULY SHARE 


AUGUST SHARE 


NBC (Chevrolet) 


23.7 


23.9 


24.6 


ABC (reruns) 


34.9 


38.3 


36.2 


CBS (reruns) 


40.0 


33.7 


39.9 



6 hrs.; 


6 mins. 


5 hrs.; 


54 mins. 


4 hrs.; 


3 mins. 


4 hrs.; 


10 mins. 



Another set of figures that are apropos to Adams' remarks are these culled also from 
Nielsen reports: 

PERIOD NO. HOURS OF VIEWING PER SET 

February 1958 
February 1959 
August 1958 
August 1959 

The influence of the tv special is popping up down Mexico way. 

An hour show loaded Avith Latin-American stars has been filmed for sponsorship by 
Ford on Mexican stations. 

An all-Mexican production staff did the job, with JWT lending a hand. 

AB-PT's financial men are knee deep in working out the final papers for the 
remaining stock ownership of WLS, ABC Radio's Chicago affiliate and operated by 
the Prairie Farmer (which the deal will likely include) for over 30 years. 

During the '30's and '40's WLS ranked as one of the great farm and community stations. 

The SKA still has plans of setting up a system that will obtain for it an efficient ! 
projection of national spot radio billings and a breakdown of these billings by 
markets. 

The basic idea of the plan is to have 425 or so stations in major markets submit 
their billings directly to Price & Waterhouse. The figures from these x number of 
markets would serve as an acceptable base for projection. 

It is hoped that the NBC and CBS o&o's can be induced to cooperate in thci 
pool, thereby allowing for a bigger bulk and a more truly representative base. 

IS SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 ] 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Advertisers with tv network shows that aren't hitting the mark this season can 
look to their agencies to unveil a new thesis. 

The keynote of the thesis will be they'll have to refix the level of what they deem 
good efficiency buys and lower their sights on what they can expect to get for their 
tv dollar. 

And the argument will take this course: The competition has been pretty well 
evened out among the three networks, there are fewer and fewer runaway hits to he 
expected, advertisers may have to adapt themselves to getting but 7-8 million homes for 
their $35,000 a minute and, anyway, even with the leaner diet that 7-8 million is 
still the best buy when compared to other media. 

There's quite a tussle going on between CBS TV and NBC TV for the eight 
one-hour mysteries that Dow Chemical will sponsor the first part of 1960. 

CBS TV would like to have them to fill the gap, partially, at least, that will be left when 
Westinghouse's Desilu Playhouse goes alternate weeks. 

If you took the computations of the networks for the top 50 markets by tv 
homes and averaged them, you'd come up with something like this in the way of a pro- 
gression : 

MARKET CLUSTERS TOTAL TV HOMES % ALL U.S. TV HOMES 

Top 10 markets 18,700,000 42% 

Top 20 markets 25,450,000 57% 

Top 30 markets 30,750,000 69% 

Top 40 markets 34,900,000 78% 

Top 50 markets 38,300,000 86% 

Both ABC and NBC are finding it quite a strain recruiting advertisers to take on 
the full sponsorship of the presidential conventions and election night coverages. 

What aggravated the selling job: (1) advertisers aren't receptive to expensive pro- 
motional spearheads in the summer (convention time) : (2) the networks have to be 
choosey about the type of account. (For instance, the drys would raise the roof if the 
beer gentry got into the act.) 

Asking prices for the complete package, \v and radio: NBC, $6 million; ABC, $i5..'5 
million. 

NBC TV's competitive jabs at ABC TV on the daytime front has been extended 
to the area of who wanted to watch the show. 

NBC dug for this one into data Trendex developed for its September inrfuiries. 

Obviously trying to show that the NBC daytime set is controlled by more wom- 
en, NBC propounded for the use of its salesmrn this set of comparisons on the basis of per 
100 sets: 

NETWORK \\C. NO. PAYTIME WOMEN VIEWERS AVC. NO. WOMEN WHO SFT.ECTEn SHOWS 

ABC TV 88 70 

NBCTV 99 87 

It may be just wishful thinking but network specialists in specials selling antici- 
pate that business will pick up for them when some of the 26-weeks commitments 
for regular programing run out. 

Thev figure a rating-disappointed advertiser here and there will be disposed to shuttle 
the residue of his season's tv appropriation for a big splash or two. 

SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Pulse is offering a new wrinkle among its services : a breakdown of audience shares 
for radio stations based on data compiled for 2,086 counties this year. 

The material will not be published but can be obtained only on order by radio sta- 
tions and agencies for specific markets. 



Trendex is offering another supplement to its service : A special breakdown of 
the ages of men, women and children that actually viewed tv during a week in 
November. 

If the rating firm finds enough buyers for this report — which will cover a period other 
than rating week — it plans to make the study three times a year. 

(See page 27 for important developments in Nielsen services.) 



Keen observers on Madison Avenue were predicting this week that before the 
quiz mess wound up it would take on vestiges of a public nightmare with cranks, 
oddballs and others using it as a stage for personal publicity or for paying off 
business grievances. 

The business grievance angle filtered into the motivational speculations of the trade early 
in the week in relation to the antics of Coty president Philip Cortney. It had been rumored 
in the cosmetic industry that one of the prime targets of the Congressional investiga- 
tion of the quizzes was Revlon, whose sales took a spectacular rise (to the 100-million- 
dollar-mark) during its $64,000 shows sponsorship. 

In both two column ads in New York newspapers and a press conference at the N. Y. Sales 
Executives Club Cortney urged (1) No more entertainment control by sponsors and (2) Busi- 
ness men who sponsored the quiz shows in question be called before the Congressional probe. 

Significant sidelight: BBDO Coty's agency, refused to place Cortney ad. 



PGW is testing a new system for compiling spot tv and radio availabilities 
which it now feels will be less complex, faster and more convenient than the Rem- 
ington-Rand punch-card system it adopted in 1957. 

The rep firm plans to keep the details of the new method — not a machine operation — 
under wraps for 30-60 days before revealing the details. 

However, PGW is still doing the other statistical work via the R-R card system. 

(How the electronic system worked in processing availabilities was explained in a 12 
October 1957 article, page 34.) 



Sellers of radio spot would do themselves a good turn if they concentrated 
some of their promotional effort on the younger generation of commercials writ- 
ers in agencies. 

Accountmen report that it's getting increasingly difficult to maintain an exciting level 
of interest in radio copy among the more bright and ambitious writers. They all 
want to apply their skills to the newer air medium. 

Noted an account executive in a toprung agency: "Selling a client on radio is only 
half the job. He wants to be assured now our better talent will do the commercials." 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 48; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 58; Washington Week, page 53; sponsor 
Hears, page 56; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 68; and Film-Scope, page 54. 

20 SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



1 ^r. rp.ults Edward Retry & Co 
television resuns . . . ^^ ^^^^^^ 



National Representatives 




J is only' 
letcial*' 



"^YOU OWE IT TO YOUR AUDIENCE 



^^"^ 'courtesy of Kayser Hosiery 

SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



21 



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22 



Offices and Representatives in Principal Cities Throughout the World 

SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 19i 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Lyn R. Patton, George Patton Advertising, Hollywood, feels that 
the selection of tv spot versus tv program sponsorship is determined 
K\ the product's special attributes and needs. "We have a beverage 
|iioduct that we promote using both methods. We have found that 
I he positive 'image' which is created via strong sponsor identification 
on a weekly tv show cannot be too 
highly recommended. Of course, 
while we may prefer program 
■sponsorship for this particular 
product, we have found that it is 
always desirable to augment our 
campaign with a sufficiently strong 
schedule of 20-second spots. This 
extends the program sponsorship 
as well as adding to our coverage. 
It gives us 'reach in depth,' and is 
the kind of campaign that is most 
likely to produce sales for the 
sponsor." Lyn is strongly opposed to the kind of advertising which 
is based on making unsupported claims for the product. "Commer- 
cials can be improved by concentrating on facts, and not on fiction. 
A frank and fresh advertising approach counteracts audience skepti- 
cism created by the ill-advised, wild-claims type of announcement." 

Alicia Frost, Adams & Keyes, Inc., New York, who buys for the 
agricultural division of the Stauffer Chemical Co., has found that 
the best time to reach the farmer is when he is at breakfast, and 
that the best medium at this time is radio. "It gives me the most 
extensive coverage and is relatively inexpensive. Choosing the right 

station, that's the trick. The sta- 
tion that has managed to program 
reports by the county agent — a 
local representative of the depart- 
ment of agriculture who serves the 
farmer — on a regular, sustaining 
basis is hard to beat. An adjacen- 
cy next to the county agent show 
is mone\ in the bank." Alicia re- 
marks that station personalities 
and farm experts, in large measure, 
determine the quality of the sta- 
tion's farm program. "The farm- 
er responds to the personal touch. Many stations, realizing this, fre- 
quently broadcast directly from the farm. The farmer then comes 
to rely upon the station personality as a source of information on 
developments which could affect his livelihood. Above all. the station 
that disseminates the most of the best information, is likely to get 
the farmer's lovaltv and is. therefore, the advertiser's best buv." 




SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



you 
can't 
buy a 



"bunch 



o' spots" 




only a carefully 
sifted schedule 
combined with 
your ideas . . . 



30«» »»** 



toucn 



e»»<«" 



23 




WOKY SALESMANSHIP 



SHOWMANSHIP 
SCHOLARSHIP 



MAKE 



EVERY SCHEDULE 
A CAMPAIGN! 

Another month — another first. Been this way since 1955 at WOKY 
in Milwaukee, where consistency is the marl< of professionalism. 
Choice of all the listeners, the WOKY list of regular advertisers reads 
like McKittricks's. From A to Z; Alcoa, American Int'l Pictures, Amer- 
ican Home Foods, American Machine and Foundry, American Motors, 
American Tobacco, American Sheep Producers Council, American 
State Bank, Armour, Associated Grocers, Associated Hospital Service, 
Associated ... (to be continued; maybe by you???) 

SALESMANSHIPis ingrained in every 

air personality and a part of the Bartell station 
acceptance that puts every campaign in orbit 

oHOWMANoHIP is in the production 

that arrests, sparks and entertains. 

SCHOLARSHIP is inherent 

in the thought, planning and pre-testing 
of every unit of sound that is broadcast. 



These qualities are 

contagious I From station 

level to Group headquarters, 

to each Adam Young 

office, you'll find more 

than receptivity — or even 

sympathy — you'll get 

good ideas I (Ask Complon 

Advertising in New York.) 






49th am 
Madison 



Payoff! 

Remember the enclosed ad? It ran 
in your book just a few weeks ago. 

Well, the series is over. Chicago 
fans are once again holding their 
heads up, Dodger fans have come 
down out of the clouds and we, here 
at WLOL, have finally emerged from 




AD MEN! 



Tht> ptirtv'x on Joe, hirry ntnl Tonv! 
WIN \ (;UAM) l\ Ol H 

tttlKII) SFRIK"' ■^.•r^HHinl I (»MI <1! 



KEl-O-LA.ND A 
tfi»t* 


WLOl AMfTi 


KSO Rad.o 


mi 


vpvi iw > j 


a)»^i<>»> J ' ' I 1 1 [ ' 


*™ ^mt 1 ' 1 1 1 I 


- 



24 



under thousands of contest entries 
with a winner in our hands. 

As a matter of fact, we had a seven- 
way tie for first place, but when we 
checked the tie-breaker scores we 
found the prognosticator extraordi- 
nary to be John R. Bain, assistant 
advertising manager of the Indian- 
apolis Power and Light Company. 

Our congratulations go out to Mr. 
Bain, and our thanks to you and the 
thousands of wonderful readers of 
your book who entered the contest. 

William A. Ficker 

prom. dir. 

WLOL 

Minneapolis 

More credit due 

Was glad to see your magazine give 
Boettcher (sponsor, 3 October) cred- 
it for an outstanding job in using 
radio intelligently. Your article, while™ 
good, certainly didn't give complete 
recognition to all people concerned. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



For example, the idea of a market 
report was kicked around 1j) Hark 
Spensley and me for many, many 
weeks. It wasn't until Bill Grant as- 
sumed active general managership of 
KOA AM & TV that we were ahle to 
bring this program to a reality. Bill, 
who had had considerable investment 
experience, gave us the necessary pro- 
fessional assistance to build this idea 
into a feasible program. 

After the program was built, it 
would not have been possible without 
the enthusiastic support of Warren 
Willard. managing partner of Boett- 
cher and the day by day professional 
assistance of Alan Dugan, Boettcher 
advertising manager. Much initial 
help was also received from Bob Mc- 
Williams, at that time v. p. of the 
Galen Broyles Advertising Agency. 

I am sure one of the reasons that 
Boettcher has been so successful is 
the fact that Mr. Willard knew to be 
successful it must be established on 
the station and allowed to run on a 
consistent 52-week basis. At the same 
time, KOA, under the direction of 
then promotion director Orville Ren- 
nie. outlined a consistent promotional 
support program which called the 
broadcast to the public's attention. 

Again, thank you for giving recog- 
nition to a successful job of using 
radio properly by an account located 
in the Rocky Mountain area. 

Robert S. Hix 

KHOW 

Denver 



Add to the list 

Sorry to see SPONSOR'S 10 October 
"Big Tv Parade" pass without a men- 
tion of Multiple Products Corpora- 
tion, New York. Actually, Multiple 
has been a tv headliner since last 
spring. Excitement generated over 
Play Spray, a cosmetic kit for little 
misses, is directly attributed to tv ex- 
posure on such stations as KTLA- 
TV in Los Angeles, WNAC-TV, 
Boston, KENS-TV, San Antonio and 
WAPI-TV, Birmingham. Currently, 
Plav Sprav is featured daily on New 
York's WNEW-TV. 

Here's hoping the next Toy Parade 
finds a spot for Multiple — a toy com- 
pany that has found spots the perfect 
product showcase. 

John Chervokas 

copy dir. 

Ray Barrow, Inc. 

Boston 



:\\ 



in 



// 



DETROIT 

you 

know 
where 
you're 

going 

with 

WJBK 

radio 



Sell 'em coming and going • Dominate 
Detroit, the "market on wheels" • Cap- 
ture the home audience, too • Go BIG 
on the "Station on the Go" • Go Sat- 
uration on special low cost multi-spot 
plan . Call KATZ for details 

WJBK- Radio is DETROIT. 

STORER 

station 



//, 



/A 



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SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



25 




OLD NEW ORLEANS FAVORITE 




V 



M& 



"9^, * 



Here's how to 
make it: 



5=^ 




On a base of creamed 
spinach place 2 artichoke 
bottoms. Fill these with 2 
poached eggs and cover with 
Hollandaise Sauce. Perfect 
with a bottle of chilled rose 
wine. 

Brennan's 
Hollandaise Sauce 

Beat 4 egg yolks, add juice 
of 1 lemon. Heat in double 
boiler, add 1 lb. melted but- 
ter. Cook over very low fire 
until thick, stirring with wood- 
en spoon. Salt to taste. 




k 



1 



Breakfast at Brennan's . . . delightful! 



WWL -TV. . . new 
NEW ORLEANS 

FAVORITE 

Things are changing fast in the three-station New Orleans 
market. WWL-TV now leads in practically all important 
time periods. 



WWL-TV Station B Station C 



% 
40.4 
49.1 
42.0 
50.0 



% 
40.1 
40.6 
39.0 
37.0 



% 

18.9 
10.7 

17.0 
11.0 



Sunday thru Saturday 

August ARB 6-10 p.m. 

10-midnight 
August Nielsen 6-9 p.m. 

9-midnight 

And WWL-TV personnel lead in experience — competitive 
experience gained in TV markets coast-to-coast. 

Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 

^WWL-TV 

NEW ORLEANS 




SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




^P ONSO R 

31 OCTOBER 1953 



INSTANT RATINGS for New York. Nielsen unveils new Instantaneous Audimeter, signed 
four stations first week. Battery powered clock gives independent time check 



New research tools for radio/tv 



^ Rating services expand; Nielsen will cover 146 
multi-station markets, give instant ratings in N.Y.C. 

^ New developments to include first Canadian NCS, 
1960-1961 Nielsen radio count (first in five years) 



I 



f any especially dramatic proof is 
needed of the growing advertiser in- 
terest in the air media, one has only 
to take a look at the activity within 
the rating services organizations 
which measure television and radio. 

These rating services are growing 
right along with the air media, 
building better measuring devices; 
rulers become yardsticks, yardsticks 
expand to tapes. 

This week brought news of some 



new dimensions added to one of the 
services. At a Tuesday morning con- 
ference in the A. C. Nielsen Co. New 
York City headquarters, this veteran 
research organization unveiled an ex- 
pansion program keeping pace with 
the growth of the radio/tv media. 

The Nielsen expansion is in four 
significant areas: 

• A perfected instantaneous tele- 
vision rating service for the New 
York Citv market. 



• Exploding the current NST re- 
ports to 146 multi-station tv markets 
to cover 9T < of the tv homes in the 
U.S. 

• The first NCS for Canada. 

• Scheduling of NCS #4 tele- 
vision and radio studies for the 
winter of 1960-61. This means that 
radio gets a set count for the first 
time since 19.56. 

Any one of these expansion areas 
might have deserved separate promo- 
tion; Nielsen chose to toss them all 
up in one blanket. 

What does it all mean to adver- 
tisers? 

The Instantaneous Audimeter 
means fast reports on h;)\\ their tv 
program is doing in America's larg- 
est market. The expansion of NSI 
reports means they can get a better 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



27 



MUSEUM PIECES: HOW NIELSEN INSTANT RATINGS 





RADIO ERA: Earliest form of checking audience (I) is this 
"appreciation" post card by Music Master; listeners had 
to affix their own stamps to vote. In 1936, Nielsen in- 
stalled its first Audimeters (35 mm tape). Two years 
later, an improved Audimeter went into radio homes. In 
1946, instantaneous radio ratings were shown in Chicago 




picture of the effectiveness of a na- 
tional buy through studying it mar- 
ket-by-market. NCS :#:4 follows the 
first Census in a decade. And for 
expansion beyond the border, Cana- 
dian NCS is the answer. 

For the past three years, in Chi- 
cago, the research firm has been ex- 
perimenting with an instantaneous 
ratings system — built entirely (except 
for the concealing cabinets) — by 
Nielsen's own 18-man engineering de- 
partment. Now, perfected to the point 
that all but precludes error — the 
equipment has been moved to Niel- 
sen's New York office on Lexington 
Avenue and is now running a check 
on that city's tv audience. 

It has been clicking away commer- 
cially for only about two weeks, but 
the service has already been bought 
by four stations in the New York met- 
ropoHtan area— WABC-TV, WPIX- 
TV, WOR-TV and WNTA-TV. 

The Nielsen Instantaneous Audi- 



meter provides quarter-hour ratings 
based upon minute-by-minute detail, 
and can record individual home data 
for cumulative audience ratings and 
duplication studies. 

The equipment collects data from 
270 television sets in some 228 tv 
homes each minute — what set is 
tuned to what channel. 

During the three years in which the 
equipment was being tested and per- 
fected at Chicago, one of the things 
learned about it according to Henry 
Rahmel. exec. v.p. and manager of the 
broadcast division, is that "informa- 
tion produced by this instantaneous 
system is in substantial agreement 
with regular NSI data, with no 
marked difference in viewing levels 
from one method to the other. The 
only question remaining," Rahmel 
continued, "is whether the industry 
is ready to continuously support a 
premium service of this type, and the 
evidence so far is that they are." If 



tv lends this support it is more than 
radio was ready to do back in 1940 
when Nielsen Co. developed instan- 
taneous radio rating equipment and 
tried it in the Chicago market. 

Some interesting facts about the tv 
Audimeter: The machine detects in- 
stantly if a sample home is not report- 
ing properly; technician knows which 
home and why. At 4 a.m. every morn- 
ing, the equipment sends out a signal 
which, in effect although not in actu- 
ality, turns on each sample home's t\ 
set. If any set proves to be out of 
order, that home is removed from the 
base count for the next day. A built- 
in electronic device runs a minute-by- 
minute check on the phone lines that 
link the Audimeter to the sample 
homes; if for any reason the tele- 
phone company opens a circuit, it is 
known at once. Such safeguards 
make sure the data reflects only Iv 
viewing and not equipment failure. 

Of significance to the national ad- 



28 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



HAVE EVOLVED 



1947 



MAUAece Twe 




vertiser is "part Two" of the Nielsen 
program: expansion of NSI markets. 
By spring, there will be NSI reports 
for 146 multi-station tv markets 
covering 97% of all U.S. tv homes 
and 98% of all tv ad dollars. 

NSI was begun in 1954; as recent- 
ly as a year ago, it covered only 32 
markets. By now it has grown to 105 
markets, which means that the next 
few months will see 41 more added 
to swell the total to 146. 

"These 146 NSI reports," says John 
Churchill, vice president of the Niel- 
sen broadcast division, "represent all 
multi-station tv markets existing to- 
day. When new competitive markets 
are created, NSI will measure these 
also. In many cases, two or three 
closely grouped cities form one tv 
market. (The 146 markets include 
231 cities.) That's the way an adver- 
tiser buys them, and that's the wa)- 
NSI reports them." Metered measure- 
{Please turn to page 64) 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




TV ERA: In 1947, a mailable tape recorder 
which radio listeners could send in was tested 
by Nielsen, and in 1949 a mailable audimeter 
the size of a car storage battery was intro- 
duced. An improved model is still used today. 
By 1954, the recordimeter was developed. 
From these came the "Instant" of ratings 





SHIRT SLEEVERS: Announcing Nielsen plans (I to r)— George Blechta, vice president; John 
Churchill, v.p. in charge of NSI; Henry Rahmel, executive v.p. and broadcast div. mgr. 



29 



MEDIA MEN 
THEY'RE STILL 
UNDERPAID 




rimtri: CiHiitf.sj' ol I'cieis-Oi ilTiii-Wi o I'Mii il, Kiiinii lepresentatives 

MEDIA PEOPLE In ad agencies have come a long way in the past decade. They're making 
double ■former salaries, are in such demand by clients, agencies, that jobs outnumber supply 



^ Agency media staffers are making more money and 
assuming more responsibility as buying needs tighten 

^ But they're still behind their creative and account 
colleagues in agency job status, salary and potential 



I v's supercharged growth as a ma- 
jor ad medium in the past decade has 
been the most direct impetus to 
agency media people gaining up- 
graded salaries and stature. But even 
though buyers and media staffers 
have doubled their earnings in less 
than a decade, they're still far behind 
their colleagues in creative and ac- 
count sections. 

Because agencies have a worsening 
problem in finding media specialists 
to fill the constantly growing demand, 
they're being forced to re-evaluate 
media jobs and status and take firmer 
steps to close the gap of inequitable 
pay and stature. This is the consen- 
sus of several experts queried by 
SPONSOR on the subject of modern 
media staffers — their jobs, salaries, 
hopes and frustrations. 

The ad pros tend to agree on these 
generalizations about media depart- 
ments in the bigger agencies (and 
major agencies set the trend and 
pace for medium and small ad 
shops) : 

• Salaries and job responsibility 
are being upgraded, and it's no long- 
er unusual to have a $45,000 a year 
media executive who sits on the 
agency plans board and shares in 
agency profits. But the competent 
media professional still makes about 
50^ less than his "creative" counter- 
part in copy or in account work. 

• Copy continues to dictate to me- 
dia too frequently, and media units 
are still looked upon by agency man- 
agement as a necessary but dull func- 
tion — "sort of like accounting," as 
one man commented. 

• The supply of media specialists 
— directors, associate and assistant 
directors, timebuyers, estimators — is 
nowhere near big enough to fill the 
demand. This fosters raiding of com- 
petitive shops and upgrading of mere- 
ly adequate rather than skyrocketing 
talent. 

• There's a continual drain on the 
supply of media staffers because they 
tend to be divided into two types of 
people: (1) those who are fairly 
complacent in their safe, less risky 
work and who are content with a 
standard 5% a year increase in sal- 
ary; (2) those who use media as a 



30 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



a ' 



stepping stone in their striving for a 
more glamorous, more risky '"con- 
tact" job in the account group or at 
the agency management level. 

• Progressive agencies, however, 
are realizing as the competition and 
the economy tighten that they are 
being forced to return to the original 
and simpler creative advertising con- 
cept: write the most creative copy and 
place it in the most creative way. 
This means there is new and/or 
added stress on acquiring — and keep- 
ing — top-level media people. 

But acquiring good people and 
keeping them are serious and hard- 
to-solve problems for most agencies. 

Here's how they acquire people: 

They bring staffers in at lower 
levels — such as media assistant or 
estimator — and train them to the 
point where they can assume more re- 
sponsible tasks. They "raid" other 
agencies, offering intangibles such as 
management recognition and status 
rather than money — because these 
days most media people make what 
thev consider a fair salary. Their 
complaint is lack of appreciation and 
stature. 

For top media men — those who 
earn as much as S60.000 a year — 
agencies maneuver elaborate negotia- 
tions to get an executive who is 
strong on creative media thinking, 
client contact and "quotable quotes," 
public speeches, presentations and 
other devices that will get his name 
and that of his agency in both con- 
sumer and trade press. 

Once agencies nave developed or 
acquired competent people, they have 
another problem — keeping them. Here 
are some of the devices which tend to 
keep a talented media person happy 
in his chosen profession and in his 
agency. 

They want respectability and pro- 
fessional recognition. They realize 
that in many shops they're regarded 
as second-class citizens, and that the 
so-termed "creative" people are con- 
strued to be the ones with "real" tal- 
ent and even with genius. 

Yet they know — and bright, alert 
management people also know — that 
it requires as much creativity and 
imagination for media people to ef- 



fect a productive schedule as it does 
for copy people to think up ad themes 
and slogans. They want personal se- 
curit\ — the knowledge that as media 
people they are regarded as thinking 
humans rather than as automatons. 
And they also want — and have gotten 
— dollar recognition with significant 
increases. 

Today, for example, an associate 
media director commands as much 
as $2.5,000 I see chart below for 
estimated salary ranges and averages 
for media people in major agencies). 
A scant seven or eight years ago he 
was lucky to be paid S10,000. 

Buyers, too, have come into their 
own. There are still instances where 
a man moves from the mailroom. 
where he made $.55 a week, to buy- 
ing, at $75 a week. But most buy- 
ers seem to make about $8,500 a year. 
And small and medium agencies are 



compelled to match the big-agency 
pay and — many times — to exceed it 
because of the shortage of competent 
buyers. And, in a small agency, a 
buyer is responsil le for much more 
activity, thinking and planning than 
his counterpart in a big shop which 
has a vast supply of buyers and assist- 
ants. 

Media, despite many obstacles, is 
coming into its own more than ever 
before. The swing upward started 
with the advent of television, in the 
opinion of Kenneth Godfrey, execu- 
tive vice president of the American 
Assn. of Advertising Agencies. 

The importance of tv, balanced 
with the slimming agency profits, has 
focused new attention on media staffs, 
he savs. "The media department is 
being looked at more critically in re- 
lation to a client's marketing plan. 
{Please turn to page 46) 



HOW MUCH MONEY DO AGENCY 
MEDIA PEOPLE MAKE? 

sponsor's survey* includes the range inide in all rases I for most 
media department jobs as ivell as the figure which appears to he the 
average or most usual figure among top agencies. 



JOB TITLE 


RANGE 


AVERAGE 


v.p. for media 


$30,000-160.000 


$35,000 


media director 


$20,000-$28.000 


$25,000 


assoc. media director 


I15.000-S2.5.000 


$18,000 


asst. media director 


$15,000-$ 18.000 


$15,000 


chief timebuyer 


$12,000 $18,000 


$12,000 


timehuyer 


$6.000-$l 5.000 


$8,500 


asst. buyer 


$5,000-$ 10.000 


$6,500 


estimator 


83.600-$7.500 


$5,000 


secretary 


$4.000-$5.200 


$4,200 


clerical 


$2,800-$4.000 


$3,800 



•Ccmilucleil among agency executives 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllll 



and others in cU«>t-ly relatwl busine; 

iiiiiiiiii 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



11^ 



31 



FIRST OF A THREE-PART SERI ES ON^RETAIL ADVERTISING 

What Macy isn't telling Gimbel 



^ Now a 52-week user, Macy's in New York, applies 
techniques learned through tests over 18 months 

^ Twice weekly, high-ticket item promotions create 
better climate than newspapers for one-day specials 



I his Christmas, more retail cloth- 
ing and department stores will be 
using air media with real savvy and 
know-how than ever before. In 
many cases, the techniques they'll be 
using stem from serious and closely- 
analyzed tests of the mediuia in spo- 
radic campaigns over the past year. 
Perhaps of greatest significance to 
every tv advertiser is what R. H. 
Macy Co. in New York City has 



learned after a year of concentrated 
effort in tv, which has turned it into 
a year-round tv advertiser for its 
New York City and branch stores. 

Though Macy's is notoriously 
close-mouthed when it comes to re- 
vealing advertising strategy and 
sales results, sponsor has learned 
through sources inside the Macy or- 
ganization how it evaluates its ex- 
perience in television, what tech- 



niques it has found most successful, 
what direction its year-round tv ad- 
vertising will take. 

Since it began its 52-week use of 
tv on 9 September, Macy's has been 
spending approximately $6,000 per 
week on three New York stations, 
WRCA-TV, WNEW-TV, WNTA-TV. 
All its television activity is confined 
to Wednesday and Friday. Macy's 
found, first of all, that tv's impact 
was sufficient to stimulate an immedi- 
ate reaction which lent itself to one- 
day sales, rather than the extended 
sales that newspaper advertising gen- 
erally requires. Wednesday copy is 
pegged to a promotion for Thursday 
(when Macy's is open at night), Fri- 
day copy to a Saturday sale. 

The day-long schedules are limited 



IVIACY'S FORMULA FOR ITEM PROMOTIONS ON TV 



FREQUENCY calls for three-station schedule 
each Wednesday and Friday, limited to one item or 
promotion per day. $6,000 weekly schedule packs in 
as many 60's as possible in daytime, nighttime 




COPY is hard-sell, e.t. over slides, emphasizing 
"tomorroiv, tomorrow only." Non-personalized ap- 
proach is in sharp contrast to taped commercials 
ivhich Macy's has been trying out in San Francisco 

ITEMS are all high-ticket, high-profit, non-im- 
pulse merchandise (mink stoles, furniture, suits). 
Price, small deposit, known brands are stressed. 
Low-priced, ready-to-wear items did not do as well 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



to one item or one promotion each 
day. Minute announcements are 
scheduled through the day and eve- 
ning somewhat in the manner of its 
experimental promotions (see SPON- 
SOR, 6 December 1959 1 , w hen it 
bought virtually everything in sight 
on a single station for one day. 

During these experiments. Macy's 
found that high-ticket items did bet- 
ter than lower-priced merchandise, a 
disco\er\ which refuted the store's 
original hunch that tv would stimu- 
late largely impulse buying. Except 
for an outstanding tv push on 
women's slacks (volume reportedly 
$100,000) two summers ago, tv was 
not at its most effective for low-cost, 
ready-to-wear sale items. Cashmere 
sweaters, bathing suits, other such 
merchandise did not do as well as 
higher-profit sale items (power mow- 
ers did a reputed S125.000). 

From this experience, Macy's took 
off on its year-round schedules with 
the following high-ticket promotions: 

9 September, a highly -successful 
push for its d.a. (depositor's ac- 
counts! charge plan, first credit-buy- 
ing plan Macy's has ever instituted. 

11 September, warehouse clear- 
ance. 

16 September, mink stoles. 

18 September, furniture. 

23 September, custom reupholster- 
ing. 

25 September, broadloom. 

30 September, furniture. 

2 October, RCA appliances. 

7 October, men's suits (a joint 
Macy's-Bamberger's promotion) . 

9 October, broadloom. 

Copy (e.t. over slides )is all 60- 
second, hard-sell, emphasizing the 
one-day character of the promotion. 
Example : "Tomorrow, tomorrow 
only, a one-day- sale of Mink at 
Macy's. a very special kind of sale 
on Macy's fourth floor ... all on sale 
for just S199 dollars . . . tomorrow, 
with just a 10% deposit, take your 
mink stole home . . ." Repetition of 
"tomorrow, tomorrow only" is com- 
mon to all Macy's tv copy. ^ 

Ed. I\'ote: Next week — retailer tv 
formulas across the country, current 
spot tv tests, successful case histories. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




BILL xMENNEN JR.. di- 
rector and v.p. for domestic 
sales, adv., researcfi and de- 
velopment, believes in radio 
''''because of what I see in my 
own Iiome," and says reac- 
tion of Mennen salesmen to 
this past summers radio 
spot campaign ivas ^'un- 
expected and gratifying."" 
Mennen has been with the 
corporation since 19.39. 



MENNEN GETS SURPRISE 
DIVIDENDS FROM RADIO 



I hat big Mennen spot radio cam- 
paign reported in SPONSOR, 17 Oc- 
tober, has been producing unexpected 
dividends for the veteran shave 
cream and toiletries manufacturer. 

Not only are sales of radio-plugged 
products — Mennen Spray Deodorant, 
Mennen Stick Deodorant, Quinsana, 
Foam Shave, Skin Bracer and Date 
Line — showing a healthy upward 
trend, but reactions from the Men- 
nen sales force and the stations on 
the Mennen list have been "unex- 
pected and gratifying" according to 
Mennen and Warwick and Legler ex- 
ecutives. 

Bill Mennen Jr., lanky sales and 
advertising boss of the Mennen Co., 
reports that his salesmen have been 
more enthusiastic over the Mennen 
radio schedule "than any of our ad- 
vertising campaigns in years. When 
we decided to switch from an all tv 
diet we were afraid we might have a 
problem in sales morale. 

"On the contrary, our radio spots 
in morning and afternoon drive time 
gave our men the first chance they 
had in years to hear our advertising, 
and they responded with a degree 



of excitement and co-operation I 
wouldn't have believed possible." 

The second unexpected but grati- 
fying dividend to the Mennen radio 
series came in the way the 102 sta- 
tions on the Mennen list flocked to 
compete in Mennen's prize "Merch- 
andising Contest." Except for three 
stations who cited policy reasons, all 
others sent in entries, and both 
agency and client say they were 
"overwhelmed" by the quality and 
quantity of the merchandising help 
Mennen received. 

In the contest, which was judged 
by sponsor's exec editor John E. Mc- 
Millin. Joe Kaselow of the N. Y. 
Herald Tribune and John Crichton 
of Ad Age, first prize (S300) went to 
WHDH, Boston; second prize (S200) 
to WELL New Haven: third prize 
(SlOO) to WMBR. Jacksonville and 
a special small market prize ($200) 
to KGBT, Harlingen, Texas. 

Says Jack Thompson. Mennen acct. 
exec at W&L. "We have found that 
radio stations today are closer to 
local retailers and marketing prob- 
lems than any other medium, includ- 
ing newspapers and tv." ^ 



33 



DOES PROMOTION NEED MORE 



^ Herman Land of Corinthian says modern audience 
promotion suffers from lack of research, planning 

^ Suggests that promotion men should adopt up-to- 
date ad techniques, particularly in media selection 



W 



BY HERMAN LAND 

Director of Public Belations and Special Projects 
Corinthian Broadcasting Corj). 



hy are program (and audience) 
promotion men neglecting the tech- 
niques of modern advertising? 

Today, most audience promotion 
done by stations, networks, agencies 
and advertisers is still largely based 
on hunch and will-o'-the-wisp inspi- 
ration. In this it resembles advertis- 
ing of the past not the present, adver- 
tising as it was before research and 
media planning rose to their present 
positions of importance. 

Why should we approach promo- 
tion as something fundamentally dif- 
ferent from advertising? As long as 
we continue to do so. promotion will 
never achieve either the efficiency or 



professional status it deserves. 

Perhaps because of its historic as- 
sociation with the hawking spirit of 
show business, promotion's inner re- 
semblance to advertising tends to es- 
cape notice. Basically, what is in- 
volved is a point of view, a way of 
attacking what is essentially a mar- 
keting problem in an organized man- 
ner, guided by facts and analysis 
rather than by whim. Here is how 
promotion looks when viewed through 
the eyes of the advertising man. This 
is only a partial view, yet it suggests 
great rewards if the revealed roads 
are followed all the way. 



The Product- 



-The advertising man 



i!]llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|i|||||||||llllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllil^^ 



PROMOTION IN THE NEWS 



THIS TIMELY ARTICLE 

by Herman Land appears 
just as the Broadcasters' 
Promotion Association is as- 
sembling in Philadelphia 
for its 4th Annual Conven- 
tion. Land, a former mem- 
ber of the SPONSOR staff was 
executive editor of Televi- 
sion Magazine before join- 
ing Corinthian Broadcasting 



liillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliliiiiiliiiiliiiiiiiiiiilililiilliiiillli^^ 




starts with a product analysis. So 
should the promotion man. This is 
not as elementary as it sounds. What 
is the promotion product? Is it a 
new series? A one-shot? A film fes- 
tival? A station image? Each is a 
separate brand and requires a dis- 
tinct approach. Of course, most of 
the time a great bundle of these 
brands must be handled simultane- 
ously. 

Except in the case of the station 
image, what you are trying to do 
is get consumer sampling of your 
program brand. How you define your 
product becomes of great practical 
importance. It determines the con- 
tent and emphasis of your campaign. 

For example, there are frequent ef- 
forts made to promote parts of the 
day, as in network daytime promo- 
tions, or a whole season of feature 
films under a festival banner. The 
basic questions are: Is the product 
to be sampled daytime, or is it the 
individual shows of the morning and 
afternoon? Is the film product the 
festival or the individual features 
themselves? If you answer daytime 
or festival, you will hit these hard in 
vour campaign. If you answer the 
individual shows, you will feature 
them and subordinate the general 
themes. 

Right here, it may be well to bring 
up that old advertising truth — no mat- 
ter how clever and professional your 
selling, vou cannot go long beyond 
the limits imposed by the product. It 
must perform as promised. Sid Mesi- 
bov, ABC's exT)loitation director, 
when asked to define exploitation and 
publicitv in television, said: 

"It's like the problem of the thirsty 
horse. There he is. standing in the 
street, trying to make up his poor 
mind whether he should try the wa- 
ter in your trough or in the other 
troughs down the street. Each of 
you is trying to capture that thirsty 
horse's attention and inveigle him in- 
to trying your trough. If you do a 
better job of inveigling, he'll try your 
trough. But if the water he sips 



34 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 19.59 



REAL ADVERTISING SAVVY? 



turns out to be sour — well, he's not 
likel\ to come back for another sip." 

Marketing plan — An advertising 
plan starts with a look at the mar- 
ket: Who are the customers you are 
tr\ing to reach? What kind of peo- 
ple are they? Where can they be 
reached? In program terms, this 
means an evaluation of the program 
brand to determine its strongest ap- 
peal?, whether its audience is likely 
to be found among men or women or 
young people, older or younger house- 
wives. those who like westerns, mys- 
teries or sports, and so forth. This 
makes possible a rational schedule of 
on-lhe-air announcements which can 
be organized for maximum efficiency. 
Many stations attempt to do this now, 
and it is the practice of the networks. 
The assumption is that a promotion 
spot will be most productive if placed 
in or next to a show with similar ap- 
peal. Thus CBS will follow Gunsmoke 
with a western promotion spot and 
will promote the U . S. Steel Hour at 
the conclusion of Desiht Playhouse. 

Media analysis — Creative people 
tend to resent and resist the media 
expert. But it is the media point of 
view which is probably needed most 
in the field of promotion. A media 
point of view represents a kind of or- 
ganizing principle. Here is an exam- 
ple from the Grey advertising agencv. 
which handles NBC's advertising and 
a substantial part of its promotional 
activity. Media chief Lawrence Deck- 
inger has drawn up a statement of 
media principles for use by the agen- 
cy's account men. It is the basic 
guide of NBC account supervisor 
David Kimble in planning promo- 
tional campaigns for his client. Deck- 
inger's statement reads in part: 

"There are four media dimensions. 
These are: 

^^Freguency — the number of times 
we get to the same person with our 
' selling message. 

^^ Reach — the extent to which we 
j cover the market in a given time (for 
example, in a month we might get to 
{Please turn to page 66) 



^lllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



CHECKLIST OF PROMO RESEARCH 



The use of research in audience promotion is still infrequent. Here are a few 
of the many subjects on which existing evidence is slim but personal opinion 
heavy. Only sound research can give us the answer to these promotion requisites: 



COMPARATIVE STREIVGTH, for program promotion, of such 
media as on-the-air, newspapers, radio, billboards, car cards, con- 
tests and exploitation. There is a woeful lack of facts in this area 



MEDIA COMBINATIONS. Do different media perform different 
promotion functions as they often do in the case of consumer adver- 
tising? How can ice support our media selection with facts? 



IMPRESSIONS. How many promotion impressions are required 
to induce consumer action — that is to attract the viewer to the screen 
or listener to the radio set? What are mininiuins and maximums? 



QUALITY OF IMPRESSION. How does this vary with the pro- 
motion treatment used? For example, how do action strips and 
stills compare in effectiveness and image building for programs? 



COPY APPEALS. Which are most productive? What should a 
headline say? Should the performer, title, or show content be fea- 
tured in an announcement? Can we back our hunches with facts? 



TIMING. How long in advance of a program is promotion effec- 
tive? When is the best time to begin any specific promotional series? 



LENGTH. How should the length of an announcement he related 
to type of program? Are short announcements better for certain 
program types than for another? What is the basis for planning? 



SERVICE. If hat service does the promotion product perform for 
the viewer? Whcit are the satisfactions it gives to the consumer? 



illlllll 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



3.5 



Gas company runs radio marathons 



^ St. Louis utility finds proper image-building format 
in 12-hour holiday saturations on single radio station 

^ Plenty of advance buildup enables company to hold 
commercials to one per hour, stress institutional sell 




SLOTTING COMMERCIALS between album selections in 12-hour saturations for Laclede Gas 
Co., KADY staffers (I to r) Ted Springman, Don Levitan, Ken Kemper follow schedule calling 
for one 60-second announcement per hour, limited number of institutional billboard reminders 




^%clmittedly, a 12-hour saturation 
on local radio involves an element of 
risk. This week, however, D'Arcy 
Advertising in St. Louis and its cli- 
ent, Laclede Gas Co., decided it had 
ironed the kinks out of this kind of 
saturation technique. With six holi- 
day "specials" under its belt, the util- 
ity signed a contract for eight more 
beginning with Thanksgiving Day. 
On eight holidays in 1959-60, Laclede 
will be sole advertiser on KADY for 
an entire 12-hour day. 

The risk at first, says Laclede's ad 
manager Bill Otto, hinged on points 
the utility company and its agency 
have been testing. They are: 

• Tiresome reiteration. Risk of 
too much repetition of commercials 
plus sameness of programing (format 
calls for 12 hours of music keyed to 
the holiday theme) . 

• Inadequate merchandising. A 
one-shot, day-long effort is wasted 
without plenty of advance stimulation 
to give it importance and audience. 

D'Arcv^ and Laclede solved these 
two problems with plenty of advance 
buildup, enabling them to spot a 
minimum of commercials in the 12- 
hour stretch. "In no case," says Otto, 
"have we approached the number of 
commercials broadcast on a station 
in a normal day. Usually we use no 
more than 10 to 15 60-second com- 
mercials in a 12-hour day." 

On Christmas Day (following the 
upcoming Thanksgiving Day satura- 
tion) Laclede will use no commer- 
cials at all, merely half -hourly bill- 
board mentions. 

The whole thing began as an ex- 
periment last Christmas, when Bill 
Cady, president of KADY, brought 
the idea to Otto and the agency. 
A 12-hour New Year's Day broadcast 
followed. 

The two holiday saturations 
brought Laclede its greatest single 
mail response. Immediately, plans 
were mapped for 12-hour broadcasts 
on Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4 
July and Labor Day. In the new 
contract, the upcoming Thanksgiving 
and Valentine Davs were added. ^ 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




SELLING SALESMEN: Burton Benjamin, CBS TV producer of Prudential Life Insurance Co.'s Twen- 
i'lefh Cenfury, discusses sales aids in connection with the tv show at Prudential district meeting 



PART THREE OF A SERIES 



HOW TO PRE-SELL RADIO/TV 



^ Today most admen agree that the media buy is 
only a beginning; your own sales force must be enthused 

^ Here's how Prudential Insurance, Ford and other 
savvy air accounts stretch their ad dollars farther 



^%n insurance company is a far cry 
from a manufacturer of packaged 
goods, but they have several things 
in common — both can improve sales 
with air advertising (and are doing 
it) and both must pre-sell their cam- 
paigns. 

The advertiser of manufactured 
products must spread his pre-sell pro- 
motion through an intricate web of 
salesmen, distributors, wholesalers, 
retailers. But the seller of "intangi- 
bles" such as insurance must excite — 
in addition to its field managers — 
thousands of agents, and the excite- 
ment must be great enough to rub off 
on their prospects for policies. 



This year, the Prudential Insurance 
Co. of America through agency 
Reach-McClinton, renewed its half- 
hour documentary, Tuentieth Cen- 
tury, on CBS TV. This fact estab- 
lishes its success in reaching the pub- 
lic with its advertising messages and 
public response. But what of its link 
with the public — its army of sales- 
men? The tv campaign can soften 
prospects, open doors; but the Pru- 
dential salesman must write up the 
policies. 

Here is an idea of the tremendous 
support Prudential gives him and 
the ways it keeps his enthusiasm at 
peak pitch over his tv umbrella. 



• In the monthly Prudential Rec- 
ord, a house organ for salesmen, an 
inside front cover article on Tuen- 
tieth Century and the tv awards it has 
won. In another Prudential house 
organ. The Bulletin, a full-dress pro- 
file on Bill Shipley who announces 
the television show commercials. 
{The Bulletin is for "ordinary agen- 
cies": The Record for district agen- 
cies) . 

• In advance of detailed announce- 
ment of the tv buy, a simulated tele- 
gram advising of the air campaign 
sent to Prudential's 1,800 field man- 
agers and assistants. 

• Following mailing of the "teaser 
telegram," a detailed description of 
the show format, data on personality 
Walter Kronkite, and a printed list 
of every station in the lineup. 

• A personal letter, over the sig- 
nature of Joseph Hoffman, Pruden- 
tial assistant advertising manager, to 
the company's 25,000 agents promot- 
ing the Tuentieth Century program. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



37 



/news 



ABOUT VOUR P 



OCNTIAL AC 



/ERTISlNO 




..! WorSd War U--00 

THE TWENTIETH CENTtTlY, 



OftH: i »e«k 



LEST THEY FORGET: Every week, Pru- 
denial sends such posters on upcoming tv 
shows to field offices to be put on salesmen 
bulletin boards for 25,000 agents to see 



• A promotion kit designed to aid 
in insurance sales sent to each field 
office manager, assistant manager and 
agent to introduce the tv season. 

• To every one of the 25.000 
agents, 20 premium key chains, to 
hand out to insurance prospects, 
which are tied in to tv commercials for 
the Prudential mortgage insurance. 

• A circular letter to all field 
managers and assistants to promote 
Prudential's film lending service of 
Tuentieth Century prints for distri- 
bution to service clubs and other 
community organizations. Such films 
from the tv show are given on a free- 
loan basis to organizations. With the 
circular letters went catalogue of 
available films and request blanks. 

• Game books, featured in 1959- 
60 Prudential tv commercials as give- 
aways to public, sent out to Pruden- 
tial sales organization. On back cover 
of these 24-page books is an ad for 
Tuentieth Century. 

• A Prudential district agencies 
executive conference addressed by 
CBS TV personnel connected with 
production of the tv series. 

• Handsomely designed displays 
sent out each week preceding each 
Prudential tv show advertising the 
upcoming vehicle. These are sent to 
all Prudential field offices for display 




SELL THE COMMERCIAL: This cleverly 
captioned brochure in two colors calls atten- 
tion to the tv commercial from U. S. Steel 
Hour that advertises innerspring mattresses 



on bulletin boards in agents' meeting 
rooms, also mailed to homes of those 
agents who do not normally report 
W'eekly to field offices. 

Another non-packaged goods type 
of account that differs widely from 
insurance is the automotive industry 
— dealing in heavy, non-impulse 
products ( the cars themselves ) , in 
accessories and replacement parts. 
Some examples of the finesse of auto 
makers in promoting internally have 
been recorded earlier in this series. 
Here are some highlights from Ford's 
promotion this year — a year that 
could be a history maker for Detroit. 

Ford, introducing its new compact 
Falcon, has made one of the biggest 
automotive investments in tv ever 
through JWT. ( Reports on sales and 
dealer showroom traffic already show 
that it apparently is paying off). But 
here were the preliminaries: 

In September, Ford did an un- 
precedented thing that all but over- 
ran Detroit. All the Ford dealers in 
the U.S. were invited to Detroit ( not 
quite all at once, but by regions). 
They were wined, dined and apprised 
of the tremendous ad support they 
would receive from the factory. 

This announcement show, known 
as "Dearborn Holiday," attracted 
about 90% of the dealers to the 



Motor City. On hand to enthuse and 
entertain these dealers were such stars 
as Tennessee Ernie Ford, Rosemary 
Clooney, Allan Dale, Ray Bolger and 
Eleanor Powell. 

For the press across the countrv, 
a closed-circuit telecast was produced 
by TNT (Theatre Network Television, 
Inc.). A closed-circuit color tape 
telecast for dealers and guests cov- 
ered 35 cities; it promoted air buys 
heavily, had such stars as Dean Mar- 
tin, Tony Curtis, Cyd Charisse, 
George Burns, Art Linkletter, Jack 
Paar, Polly Bergen, Betty Hodges, 
George Gobel — also Ward Bond from 
Wagon Train. 

Enlargements of double-spread ads 
in Life (promoting Ford's tv shows) 
were sent to every dealer. Each week 
a "snipe panel" announcing the star 
of the upcoming show is sent along 
to be clipped on these enlargements. 

With RCA, Ford made a deal ena- 
bling its dealers to obtain color tv 
sets at big discounts for dealer parties 
at announcement time. 

Every month, the Ford Dealer Bul- 
letin describes both radio and tv pro- 
motion by the factory with which 
local dealers can tie in. 

TNT, whose network for closed- 
circuit telecasts now numbers more 
than 300 cities, reports many uses of 
this type of internal promotion by the 
automotives. Chrysler Corp., for ex- 
ample, has used the TNT set up five 
times; one of the memorable ones 
was the Plymouth sales push in 1957 
that starred, with Plymouth execs, 
Bob Hope and Lawrence Welk, was 
seen by 28,000 dealers in 41 cities. 

In radio, the American Motors' in- 
ternal exploitation of its Rambler 
news on NBC Monitor is a study in 
efficiency. A recent Rambler conven- 
tion in Atlantic City ( in line with its 
introduction of 1960 models) had as 
its central theme its radio sales cam- 
jjaign. Monitor banners were every- 
where. Closed-circuit broadcasts were 
piped in from NBC correspondents 
overseas. For such meetings region- 
ally, Rambler puts on similar shows, 
hires professional "meeting packag- 
ers" to set them up. 

The methods of pre-sell are varied 
(more coming next week), but the 
aim is always the same: to stimulate 
the people who make it possible for 
consumers to buv. ^ 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



'/ 



TV BASICS/NOVEMBER 



New tv shows at a glance: belo^v par 



^ Nielsen's 24-iiiarket report covering share of audi- 
ence shows westerns, varieties holding up ; suspense down 



A%n early rundown of network tv 
audiences shows that the new pro- 
grams aren"t exactly setting the 
world on fire. 

Of all the major categories, west- 
erns are doing the best; variety- 
comedy seems to be the hottest pros- 
pect and suspense-drama shows up 
as the weakest link. 

This rundown comes from Niel- 
sen's 24-market report, showing 
cities with programing from all three 
networks. The report represents a 



new speeded-up service by Nielsen 
which is mailed six days after the 
last reported telecast. 

The Nielsen figures below I see 
chart ) are based on the latest infor- 
mation available, covering the week 
ending 11 October, each year. Share 
figures, rather than ratings, are used 
to show relative popularity. 

The chart compares share of audi- 
ence by program type, 1959 vs. 1958 
I covering all shows in each cate- 
gory), and share of audience of the 



new 1959 network tv shows only. 

Assuming a 33.3'^'f share is par, 
the new shows fall short of ca|)turing 
an average share of the audience. 
The average share for all newcomers 
is 27.7 7r.'' 

Other highlights of this season, 
according to Nielsen calculations: 

• 31// of evening programing 
sold to sponsors this fall is repre- 
sented by shows new since last 
spring; 

• Another 23'/? of network-sold 
evening time is accounted for by old 
programs in new time slots; 

• The same three shows remain 
opposite each other in only two half- 
hour time slots. ^ 



Share of evening audience by program type, 1959 vs. 1958 

1958 1959 



all shows 



all shows 



new shows only 





# programs 


share 


# programs 


share 


# 


programs 


share 


Westerns 


21 


36.4 


28 


;i5.2 




10 


:i2.2 


Suspense drama 


11 


30.4 


16 


29.2 




9 


20.5 


General drama 


10 


30.6 


11 


26.1 




5 


24.0 


Silualion comedy 


15 


33.4 


16 


28.6 




i 


26.5 


Variety 


18 


29.6 


17 


30.0 




4 


29.8 



= .Suuice; .\. C. Nitlsen, 21-market tv ratings npoit — week ending 11 October 1959; JIXA report-week ending U October 19JS. | 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^^^ 

1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 

Specials scheduled during four ^eeks ending 20 November 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 


COST 


SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 


PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 


COST 


SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 


Android ( N ) 


$130,000 


RCA, JWT— 11/8 


Ernest Heniinjiwav <(!l 


^265.000 


Buick, Mc-E— 11 19 


Fred Astaire 1 N > 

AT&T Telephone Hr. (N) 


350,000 
275,000 


Chrysler, Burnett— 11 4 
ftl&T, C&W— 11 6, 11 20 


Bob Hope (N) 


320,000 


Buick, Mc-E— 11 9 


Jack Benny iC) 


275,000 


Greyhound, Grey; Benrus, 
Grey— 11 7 


Louis Joiirdan ( N) 


260.000 


Timex. Doner & Peck — 
11 11 


Milton Berle (N) 


230,000 


Zerex, BBDO; Warner- 
Lambert. Bates— 11 1 


Moon & ."sixpence (N) 


375.000 


RCA, JWT; Renault. Kud- 
ner— 10 30 


CBS Reports (C» 


57,500 


B. F. Goodrich. Mc-E; Bell 
& Howell, Mc-E— 


Our Town (N) 


250,000 


AC UMS, Camp-E— 1113 






10 '27, 11 11 


Show of .Month iC) 


275,000 


DuPont, BBDO— 11 9 


First Ladv of World (N) 


225,000 


Firestone, Sweeney & J — 


Shubert .Mley (N) 


250.000 


Sinclair, GMM&B— 11 13 






10/25 


Special Tonight (C) 


275.000 


Gen Mills, BBDO: West- 


Hall of Fame (N) 


250,000 


Hallmark, FC&B— 10 26, 






clox, BBDO— 10 27 






11 15 


S. Temple's Stor\book 'A) 


75 000 


Break. Ayer— 11 9 



• N>t«(]iks: lAl AUr T\' ; iCi (US TV: (X) MiC TV 

For tlie record: liing flcisb.v .'Show l.\l. Dlilsrnobile. $:ilin, 111)11. 9 2fl : I'rilnk Sinatra SIk 



.\), Timcx, $.•51111,0(10 uloesn't reflect ninrkot value of Eiie<t ~lar "swaps"), 10,19, 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



39 




2. NIGHTTIME 



C O 




P A 




SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



Small World 

Olin-Mathieson 

(D'Arcy) 
3 F $30,000 



vieet The Press 

ilarihattan Shirts 

(Daniel & 

Ciiarles) 

I^ $12,000 



No net service 



Twentieth 
Century 

Prudential 

(R-McC) 

n-F $35,000 



aber of London 

sterling (DFS) 
ly-F $28,000 



D Edwards 

Amer Home 
(Bates) 



» 9 . g oe ii 



No net service 



News 

Texaco (C&W) 
<-L $6,500tt 



D. Edwards 

Equitable 

(FC&B) 

alt Am. Home 

(Bates) 

♦>* W.J OOII 



News 

Texaco (C&W) 
<-L J6,500tt 



Colt .45 

Nestle (Mc-E) 

alt 

Derby (Mc-E) 
hV F $13,800 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 

(BUnO) 
\-F $37,000 



RIverboat 

(7-8) 
Corn Prod 

(L&N) 
alt hr. open 
Ji: r ''■""" 



■"lo net service 



ohn Daly News 

sust 



Edwards 
Amer Home 
(repeat feed) 



News 

Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



ohn Daly News 

sust 



D Edwards 

Equitable 
Am. Home 



(repeat leea) 



tars In Action 

sust 



News 

Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



ohn Daly 
luit 



Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
falser Co (Y&R) 
Jrackett (Y&B) 
-F $78,000 



Dennis The 
Menace 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

c F $36,000 



RIverboat 
Hall of Fame 

(7:30-0) m 



Cheyenne 

(7:30-8:30) 

Ralston (Gard.) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

'atl Carb (Esty) 

V-F $82,.500 



Masquerade 
Party 

Amer Home 

(Bates) 
h $13,000 



Richard 
Diamond 

Pliarma-Craft 

(,nVT) 

alt 

Block (SSCB) 

^O ' P M 9 . 99I1 



Bronco 

(alt wks 
7:30-8:30) 
im. Chicle, B-M 
Glidden, Nat'l 
Carbon. Gen 
Mills, Ritchie 
nahi-st. Corning 



Sugarfoot 

(7:30-8:30) 
Am. Chicle, 
i. J. Reynolds, 
niitehall, Glid- 
ien. Carnation, 
en Mills, Nat'l 

■^.i-hnr. T.,i<1png 



Laramie 

(7:30-8:30) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
unshine Biscuits 

(C&W) 

P&G (B&B) 

V-F $0.T.000 



Court 
Last Res 

sust 



Maverick 



Ed Sullivan 

(»-9) 
Jfercury (K&E) 
lit Kodak (.IWT) 
,'-L $85,800 



Sunday 
Showcase 

(8-9) 
arious sponsors 
• 



Cheyenne 

Johnson & J 

(Y&R) 

Armour (FCB) 

:^nrning (Ayer) 

Mattel (C-R) 



The Texan 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Batet) 

alt 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkso?!) 

ti.£. "■' """ 



I ove & Marriage 

Koxzema 

(SSC&B) 

! c-F $38,000 



I ennis O'Keefe 

Oldsmobile 

(Brother) 

4!-F $38,000 



Laramie 

pVarner-Lambert 

Lam & Feasley) 

Ansco (B&B) 

:!ris-My (OBJl) 

W-L (Bates) 



Charlei 

leaver's 1 

Lobby 

Mogen Di 

(E. Wei 

± I 



Law Man 

i. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

-F $41.000 



Ed Sullivan 



Sunday 
Showcase 



Bourbon St. 
Beat 

(8:30-9:30) 
orillard (L&N) 
L-O-F (FSR) 
r^a 900,000 



Father Knows 

Best 

l.ever (JWT) alt 

Scott (.TWT) 
S.c-F $39,000 



Wells Fargo 
Amer Tobacco 

(SSC&B) 
It P&G (B&B) 

\i'-F $47,000 

I ob Hope Show 

(n.DO - n.ao) m 



Elgin, Phillips 
V-T $82,000 

Wyatt Earp 

en Mills (DFS) 

alt P&G 

(Compton) 

f-F $40,000 



Doble Cillls 

Pillsbury 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 



Fibber McCee 

& Molly 
Singer (Y&R) 

alt 

Stan Brands 

(JWT) 



T-rr W.m\ ; ITT m.ibo 



zzie Gr 
[Codak (i 
alt 
Quaker 

(JWT 
-F 



The Rebel 

L&M (DFS) 

alt 
P&G (Y&R) 
-F $42,500 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 

(BRDO) 

■)r-F $51,000 



The Chevy 

Show 
Dinah Shore 

(9-10) 
Chevrolet 
(Camp-E) 

T T""= """ 



Bourbon St. 
Beat 

Van Heusen 

(Grey) 

leynolds Metal 

(L&N) 

Int'l Latex 



Danny Thomas 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

c-F $47,500 



Peter Cunn 
Brlstol-Myeri 
(DCS&S) alt 
R. J. Reynolds 
(Esty) 
HTy-F $38,000 



The Rifleman 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

P&G (B&B) 

Ralston 

(Gardner) 

^-F $38.000 



Tightrope 

harmaceuticals 
(Parkson) 
F $39,000 
lal Tonight 

(8:30-10) % 



J y 
S jec 



Arthur Murray 

1 .orillard (L&N) 
alt 

Sterling (DFS) 
L $30,000 



HawaiianI 

(9:30-10| 
:;arter (I 
Whiteh 
(Batel 



« 



I The Alaskans 

(9:30-10:30) 

L&M, P&G, 

Armour, 

Bulova 



Hitchcock 

Presents 

Bristol-Myers 

(Y&R) 

ily-F $39,000 



The Chevy 
Show 



(U.-McU) 

,dv. In Paradise 

(9:30-10:30) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
Armour (FCTB) 
ris-My (Y&R) ! 
-F $80,000 

hirlev Temple 



Ann Southern 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 
F $40,000 

how of Month 

(9:30-11) % 



Icoa-Coodyear 
Theater 

Icoa (FSR) alt 
(loodyear (Y&E) 
4r-F $39,000 



'hilip Marlowe 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

3rown & Wmsn 

(Bates) 

-F $39.000 



\l 



iL 



Red Skelton 

Pet Milk 

(Gardner) 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) 

T' ^-^'^ 00" 



Ford Startime 

(9:30-10:30) 
Ford (JWT) 
-L $230,000 

(average) 



Hawaiian 

Am. Cl 
(BatcT 

Har Rife 
(K&l 



I The Alaskans 

Johnson & J, 

DuPont, 

Anahlst, 

I Luden's, 7-Up 



Benny alt 
Cobel 

Lever (JWT) 
C-L $47,000 



oretta Young I 
Tonl (North) 
lit Philip Mor- 
ris (Burnett) 

F $42,500 



]ir 



<):5l5-i6:JSr^ 

dv. In Paradise 

ejTiolds Metals 

(L&N) 
lahist (Bates) 
J&J (Y&R) 

olaroid (DDB) 

I tl lOlIft ( ii9 K ) 



I or 



Hennessey 

illard (L&N) 

alt 

Gen Foods 

(Y&R) 

c-F $39.000 



(T 



Steve Allen 

(10-11) 
Plymouth 
(Ayer) 
,'-L $125,000 



Mcoa Presents 
Alcoa (FSB) 
r-F $35,000 



Carry Moore 

(10-11) 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

P-G (Maxon) 

C|V-L $109,000 



Ford Startime 

includes 
Art Linkletter, 
Dean Martin, 
Jezebel Beeks, 
George Bums 



Wed 

Figh 
rown &i 
(Bitl 
Miles (f 
(10-i 



r 



/orM of Talent 

P. I>orillard 

(L&N) 

(iIuV-L $46,000 



Vhat's My Line 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

alt Sunbeam 

(Perrin-Paus) 

•L $32,000 



■Jo net service 



Man With 
A Camera 

G.E. (Grey) 
-F $34,000 



June Allyson 

iiPont (BBDO) 
ir-F $44,000 



Steve Allen 
Hall of Fame 

(0:30-11) # 



Keep Talking 

utual of Omaha 
(Bozell & J) 
-L $18,000 

r. Tom Dooley 

(10:30-11) 



I ol 



Carry Moore 
aroid (DDB) 
C. Johnson 
(N^-&B> 

CBS Reports 
(10-11) 



E riefing Session 

sust 



Wed. 
FigH 



Specials, see page 43. 

* Color Bbow, ttOost is per segment. Prices do not include snstaining, par- 
ticipating or co-op programs. Costs refer to average show costs including 
talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency commission). 



40 



They do not include commercials or time charges. This chart covers period 
24 Oct. -20 Nov, Program types are indicated as follows: (A) Adventure, 
(Au) Audience Participation, (0) Comedy, (D) Documentary, (Dr) 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



A G R A P H 



24 OCT. - 20 NOV. 



WEDNESDAY 

CBS NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC '' 



) Edwards 

rter (Bates) 
Nat'I Carbon 

(Esty) 

I 9 .HW II 



News 

Texaco (C&W) 
L $6,500tt 



D Edwards 

WTiltehall 

(Bates) 

1!-L J9,500tt I 



News 

exaco (C&W) 
-L $6.500tt 



D Edwards 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

alt sust 
** M. S OO tt 



News 
Texaco (C&W) 
L $6,500tt 



net service 



Mo net service 



No net service 



Mo net service 



Edwards 
Carter 
•t'l Carbon 



News 

Texaco 

(repeat feed) 



ohn Daly News 
suit 



D Edwards 

Whitehall 
(repeat feed) 



News 

Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



olin Daly News 
sust 



D Edwards 

Parliament 

alt sust 



News 

Texaco 

(repeat feed) 



le Line-Up 
7:30-8:30) 
eter Paul 
(DFS) 
■k (OB&XI) 



V tsu.uuu 

e Line-Up 

ihattan Shirt 
mlel & C) 
rning Glass 

(Ayer) 
Idden Paint 

'ewsmitli) 

am. Fimiins 



Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 

Ford (JWT) 

ational Biscuit 

(Mc-B) 

•F $78,000 



Cale Storm 

A'arner-Lambert 
(Lara & F) 

alt 

Bristol-Myers 

(Y&R) 

!c-F $30,000 



To Tell The 
Truth 

Carter (Bates) 

alt 
Tonl (North) 
-L $22,000 



Law of The 
Plainsman 

Ansco (B&B) 

Renault (Kudner) 

Sunshine Bis. 

(C&W) 

F $30.000 



\' 



Walt Disney 
Presents 

(7:30-8:30) 
Mars (Knos-R) 

Hill (Ayer) 
^-L, $94,000 



(repeat leea) 



Rawhide 

(7:30-8:30) 

LcTer (JWT) 

Parliament 

(B&B) C 

Vick (Morse) 

V-F ji B . OBB 



People Are 
Funny 

Greyhound 

(Grey) 

Sulova (Mc-E) 

F $24,000 



Dick Clark 

Show 

Beech-Nut 

Life Sar»n 

(Y&R) 

iu-L $14,500 



Perry Mason 

(7:30-8:30) 
Colgate (Bates) 
Parliament 
(B&B) 
: ly-F $80,000 



Bonanza 

(7:30-8:30) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
RCA (K&E) 
K-F $78,0. 



Wagon Train 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

(alt % hr.) 



Donna Reed 

Campbell 
(BBDO) 

alt 
.Tohnson & J ^ 
(Y&Rj_ 



Betty Hutton 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

c-F $45,000 



at Masterson 

Sealtest (Ayer) 
Hills Bros. 
(West Coast) 
F $38,00') 



Walt Disney 
Presents 

Canada Dry 

(Mathes) 

Derby (Mc-E) 

WirrI Tinlflno 



Rawhide 

Lever (JWT) 

Peter Paul 

(DFS) 

Pream (B&B) 



iTJ75c!! — lAU-li;) -' 

Hotel D'Paree 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

alt 

L&M (Mc-E) 

,'-F $43,000 



Trouble 

Shooters 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 

A Co. (Scott) 



lohn Cunther's 
High Road 

lalston (GB&B) 
)r-F $31,000 



$J9,SU 



Specials 

(8:30-9:30) 
irious sponsors 
• 



Perry Mason 
Sterling <DF8) 

Gulf (Y&R) 
Hamm (C-M) 

Jack Benny 
(7:30-8:30) ^ 



Bonanza 

segs open 



(LaR) 



Into Space 
. Tobacco 
(BBDO) 

$38,000 



c-P 



$38,000 



rice Is Right 

Lever (OBM) 

alt Speldel 

(NC&K) 
L $21.S0fl 



The Real 

McCoys 

'&0 (Comptao) 

c-F $39,000 



ohnny Ringo 

!. C. Johnson 

(NLB) alt 
P. Lorillard 

(L&N) 
■-F $35,000 a 



hnny Staccato 

Bris. -Myers 

(Y&R) 

alt 

, J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
-F $37,000 



Man From 
Blackhawk 

Miles (Wade) 

alt 
R. J. Reynolds 
(Esty) 
F $38.000 



Leave It To 

Beaver 
lalston (GB&B) 
^nahist (Bates) 
olaroid (DDB) 
(c-F $30,00 



Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Rrn & Wmuo 

(Bates) 

Kimberly-Clark 

(FC&B) 



■^rr 



$39,000 



Man&Challeng 

R. J. Reynold. 

(Esty) alt 

Chemstrand 

(DDB) 



Millionaire 
Itte (Bates) 

$42,000 



Perry Como 

(9-10) 

Kraft 

(JWT) 

uV-L $125,000 



Pat Boone 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

luV-L $61,000 



\' 



Zane Grey 
S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) «U 

General Foods 

(B&B) 

P $45,000 



chelor Father 

Whitehall 
(Bates) 

alt 



7 Sunset Strip 

(9-10) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 



TTP S55,000 



7 Sunset Strip 

H. Ritchie 

(K&E) 

R. J. Rej-nolds 

(Esty) 
Carter (Bates) 



-.il. 



Desilu 
Playhouse 

(9-10) 

Westinghouse 

(ilc-E) 



Specials 
Our Town 

(8:30-10) 



.awrence Welk 

(9-10) 
Dodge (Grant) 

lu-L $45,000 



Mr. Lucky 
Lever (JWT) 
F $43,000 



The Deputy 

elloKtr (Burnett 

alt 

Gen Cigar 



mnrr 
'p-F $39,00 , 

I 

Five Fingers 

(9:30-l*:30) \ 
Warner-Lamb, 
lidas. Sterling 
Corning Glass 
V-B tt « i »» ' 



1,1 v; Cot a 
Secret 
olds (Etty) 
alt 

,: |lstol-Myers 
,(DCSS) 

\ isum. 



Perry Como 
nother Evening 
With Astair 

(9-10) # 



Untouchables 

(9:30-10:30) 
L&AI (Mc-E) 
Armour (FCB) 

P&G (B&B) 

fv-F $80,000 



Playhouse 90 
(9:30-11) 
Amer Gas E 
(L&N) 
-L&F $110,000 
(OOmln.) 



$42,000 



nie Ford Show 
Ford (JWT) 
-L $42,000 



Desllu 
Playhouse 



cv 



M Squad 

m Tob (SSCB) 

alt 
lerling (DFS) 

.£ Kii.nnn 



.awrence Welk 



ipave Gun. Will 
Travel 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

it Lever (JWT) 

W-F $40.000 



, Steel Hr 

'■' wks 10-11) 
»;'.8. steel 
"(BBDO) 



$80,000 



This Is Your 

Life 
P&G Burnett 
L $52,000 



Untouchables 

Lewis Howe 

(Mc-E) 

Carnation 

(E\MIR) 

nahist (Bates) 



Playhouse 90 

Allstate 

(Burnett) 

alt 

P^ynolds (Eaty) 

Hemingway 

Special Q 



"ou 



:'h; 



Bet Your 
Life 

annaceutlcals 
(Parkson) alt 
: -ever (BBDO) 
L $53,000 



obert Taylor's 

Cap't of 

Detectives 

P&G 

(B&B) 

ry-F $45,000 



Twilight Zone 

Gen Foods 

(Y&R) 

alt 

Kimberly-Clark 

(FCB) 



Cavalcade of 
Sports 

ette (Maxon) 

(10-concl) 

L $55.000 



Gil 



Si 



ubilee, U.S.A. 

(10-11) 
fassey- Ferguson 

(NX&B) 
fu-L $20,000 \ 



Gunsmoke 
tM (DFS) all 
Sperry-IUnd 
(Y&R) 

-F $42,000 



Five Fingers 

DuPont. P&G. 

Uelene (?urtls. 

Bris-Myers 



^le Theatre 
wki 10-11) 

\ ^Irmstron^ 
;,j''BBDO) 

' $80,000 

^S Reports 



/ichita Town 
P&G (B&B) 
-F $38,000 

.ouis Jourdan 

(10-11) # 



■***-•■ 



Bulova (Mc-E) 



Take A Good 
Look 

Dutch Masters 

Cigars 

(EWHR) 

alt open 



(9MU-11) 



?evlon Party 

30-11 alt wks) 
levlon (W&L) 
L $175,000 



awless Years 

Liberie (^jlver 

(Wade) 
-F $28,000 



V\ 



Black Saddle 

L&M (Mc-E) 

alt 

Alberto Culver 

(Wade) 



:tf- 



lei 



TTTTTW 



rson to Person 

Pharmaceuticals 
(Parkson) 

alt ) 

Tamer-Lambert 
(L & Feasley) 



Ta 



ckpot Bowling 
>-uk (Wennan 

& SHiorri 



ubilee, U.S.A. 

Wmson-Dickle 

(FSR) 

Nat'I Carbon 

(Esty) 



Markham 

Schlltz (JWT) 

\ y-F $39,000 



(Bates) 



It Could Be 
You 

^larmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 



<J L 



JiS,UUU f 



MU.UUU yR-L 



rwr 



Drama, (P) Film, (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (L) Live, (M) Misc. 
(Mu) Music, (My) Mystery, (N) News, (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Sc) Situation 
Comedy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety, (W) Western. tNo charge for repeats. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means starting 
date for new show or sponsor in time slot. 



41 





Bok Reitzel, Homer Odom and Jack Davis (Mc- 
Gavren Company Los Angeles) discuss KABL's 
remarkable Pulse and Hooper ratings and amazing 
response to KABL's good music programming. In 
such discussions, McGavren men gain a thorough 
understanding of each station's local sales plans. 



Fact that KABL is first good music station in 
American History ever to hit first place in a metro- 
politan market is discussed by Jack Davis and 
Homer Odom. Here they are ready for next agency 
call to present amazing KABL story to advertisers. 



for facts you can use about San Francisco 

. . . ask the man who knows! 





Davis and Odom inspect KABL supermarket dis- 
play in San Francisco grocery chain using KABL 
schedule. Both discuss fact that KABL's good 
music attracts homemaking housetvives. McGavren 
men follotv campaigns from agency to actual point 
of purchase. 



Through San Francisco's Chinatoivn, Odom and 
Davis hear KABL music everyivhere. Listenership 
from all races makes up KABL's number one posi- 
tion in San Francisco. On trips like these, the man 
from McGavren gets to know his markets and 
stations. 




KABL represented nationally by 

DAREN F. MCGAVREN CO., INC 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • SEATTLE • ST. LOUIS 

. . . ask the man who knows! 



42 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




'Sic is San Francisco 




Jack Davis, of the Daren F. McGavren Co. 
Los Angeles office visits San Francisco's new 
rating leader, KABL, a McLendon station. 
Four weeks out of every year, Daren F. 
McGavren salesmen and managers work as 



local salesmen in McGavren Stations. Arriv- 
ing at KABL, Davis was greeted by new 
ratings— KABL number one in morning San 
Francisco audience with afternoons number 
two only to San Francisco Giant baseball. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



4,-^ 



7 



DAYTIME 



C O 




P A 




SUWUM I 

CBS 



CBS 



T U E 3PAT 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



NBC 



Lamp Unto My 
Feet 

lUlt 



ABC 



NBC 



Morning 
Playhouse 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 

sust 



Morning 
Playhouse 

<ust 



Dough Re Mi 
•ust 



**"'*""•- "■— * 



ABC 



Look Up & Live 
•uit 



On The Co 

sust 



ireasure Hunt 

Ptmds 
P&O tit 

Lever 



On The Co 

sust 



Culver alt 

Gold Seal 

Fiirldalre tit 

Klelnert 



I LUVU LUEy 

Menthol alt 

SUBt 

Lever 

alt sust 



Eye On 

New York 

•uit 



Mce Is Rlghf 

Lever 

tit Pondi 

SterllDC 

tit WbitebtU 



I Love Lucy 

Lever alt sust 

(Uit 

alt U. S. Steel 



Price Is Right 
Lever tit 

Nabisco 



Stand Brands 



Camera Three 

■Uit 



Woman 

(11-12; 11/9) 

December Brid( 

■ust 



XoticetmaTion 

Culver alt 
Lever 



Ponds alt Lever 



December Bride 
Oolgate 

Tick alt sust 



Concentration 
Frlgldalre 
Larer tit 

Alberto Culver 



T i ul l i u i 
Consequences 

sust 



Johns Hopkins 
File? 

iUlt 



The Last Word 

sust 



Restless Gun 

Structo Mfg. 



Love ot Life 

sust 

Amer Home Prod 
alt Nabisco 



Truth or 

Consequences 

Pond3 ait Miles 

P&O 



Restless Cun 

Dusharme 



Love of Life 

sust 



SejiLh fui 

Tomorrow 

P&O 



Amer Home 



Search For 



P&G 



Restless C 

Structo M' 

Love That 

AHierhi-fiiil 



Bishop Pike 
sust 



Love That Bob 

Ex-Lax 
Johnson & J. 



Guiding Light 
P&G 



It Could Be You 

Whlteliall 
alt Ben Gay 

Ponds lit P&Q 



Love That Bob 

Gen. Foods 
Beecli-Nut 



tomorrow 
P&G 



Guiding Light 
P*G 



You 

AI. Culver tit 

Miles 

Armour tit P&G 



Drackett 

Sterling 

Phillip's M 

Gen. Poo 

TV Anten 



College Newt 
Conferenct 

iUSt 



Music Bingo 
sust 



No net service 



News 

(1:S5-1:S») 

sust 



No net service 



Music Bingo 

sust 



No net service 



News 

(I:15-1:S0) sust 



No net service 



Music Bii 

Susham 



world lurns 
P&G 

Sterllnc tit 

Menthol 



Football Kickoff 

Gen. Mills 

alt 

Carter 



Frontiers of 
Faith 

sust 



World Turns 
P&G 



Nabisco alt 
Ctmttien 



No net service 



No net service 



For Better Ur 
For Worse 

sust 



yueen to 
Day 
•ust 



Professional 

Football 

various timet 

various sponsort 



NBA Pro 
Basketball 

Anheuser-Busch 
Vi regional 



Day In Court 

S. C. Johnson 
Best Foods 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

sust 



Queen for a 
Day 



e a i n a iu ii i i 

Sterling, Armour 

Listerlne. Block, 

S. C. Johnson, 

Best Foods 



Day In Court 

Toni, Johnson & 
I., S. C. Johnson 

(Tiila Sterm 



Vlck alt sust 



Alberto Culver 



Day In C 

S. C. Joh 
Whltehi 



Art Linkletter 

Scott 
tit Toni 
Kellocf 



Beedi-> 

Drackei 

Johnson I 

Coty 

Ex L a 

Beat The 

John.^; . 
Joh I 
Block. 

S. C. Jol 

W i u B u n 



NBA 



Ar t Linklett er 

Lever 

sust alt 

Ytn Ctmp 



The Thin Man 

sust 



sterling. Lever, 
TV Antenna, 

Beech-Nut, 
S. C. Johnson 

Drackett, Durkee 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Beat I he Clock 

J. & J., Lever, 

Beech-Nut, 
S. C. Johnson 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 

■ust 






Open Hearing 
•■it 



NBA 



Beat The Clock 

Ex-Lax, Coty, 
T^nl 



Millionaire 
Colette 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



Millionaire 

sust 



C li u iiii jiu ii ih i p 

Bridge 
No. Amer. Van 

Lines 



Trust? 

Block, Lever. 

• Coty 



ntAti\ IS TAUf! 

Mentholatum 
alt Lever 



From These 
Roots 

sust 

lUit 



NBA 



Who You Trust? 

Armour 

Johnson & 

Johnson 



Verdict Is Yours 

sust 



Amer Home 
alt Lever 



From These 
Roots 

sust 

■ust 



Scott alt Toni 



Paul WInchell 

Hartz Mountain 
Louis Marx 



NBA 



American 
Bandstand 

Best Foods. Gen. 
Mills, Armour 



Brighter Day 
P&O 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



The House on 
High Street 

Sterling 

sust 



ftl tlBl UJ II 

Bandstand 

Luden's, Vicks 

Lever 
General Mills 



D iight t F B oy 



P&O 



Secret Storm 
G«n MlUi 

alt Scott 



The Mouse on 

High Street 

sust 

sust 



Trust 

Beecl 
Gen 
Reynol 
Johnfn 
Ij 



Amerld 
BandstJ i 

Armoi, 
?eech-Nut, t- 
Phil. 

irRiT.r 

Ameriii 
Bands! d 

Toni. Gen I 
Cleara 



Broken Arrow 

Mars Candy 



World Series 
of Golf 

Bayuk alt 
Am. Safety Razor 
Sp-F $50,000 



American 
Bandstand 

Northam- Warren 

Speidel. Vicks. 

Luden's 



Edge of Night 
P&G 

Menthol 

alt sust 



Split Personality 
sust 



Sterling 
tit Lever 



American 
Bandstand 

Keepsake, Toni 



Edge ef Night 
P&O 

Sterling 

alt Vlck 



Split Personality 
Borden alt sust 

sust alt 
Lever 



Matty's Funday 
Funnies 

Mattel 



The Last Word 

sust 



World Series 
of Golf 



American 

Bandstand 

eo-op 



American 

Bandstand 

eo-op 



Amerii 
Bandstid I 
•o-o I 



Lu iiB Ra ii t ti 

Qen KlUt 

Lionel Corp. 
Sweets 



College Bowl 

Gen. Electric 



Time-Present 

Kemper Ins. 



Rin Tin Tin 

Sweets 
Louis Marx 



Rin Tin Tin 

5en Jlills 




hlOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
METWORK TELEVISION 
DOM PARAGRAPH 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (40, 41 ) 
includes regularly scheduled programing 24 October to 
20 November, inclusive (with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sched- 



VG 




A P H 



24 OCT. - 20 NOV 



IfEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 

!■■ I iii 



m—* 



SATURDAY 



Dough Re Mi 

iust 



Morning 
Playhouse 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 

Coiigoleum 



Morning 
Playhouse 



Dough Re Mi 

lUit 



I leckle & leckle 

sust 



Howdy Doody 

ust all Nabisco 



Omtliuntal 



Treasure Hunt 

Miles alt sust 



P&G. alt 

Gen Mills 



On The Co 

sust 



,^usi_ 



Treasure Hunt 

Nabisco 
alt Frlgidaire 

?m 



On The Co 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Supp Hose alt 
suit 



WhltAj^l .It 



Mighty Mouse 
0«n Poods 

alt sust 
Colgate all 



Ruff & Reddy 

Borden 

G«n Foodi 



OBU lUUUI 



I Love Lucy 

sust 



Price Is Right 

Frlgldairs 

Sterling 



I Love Lucy 

Lever 



Price Is Right 

Culver 
alt Lever 



MilQI »» 



I Love Lucy 

Lever alt 
r.cn Mills 



Slerllnf 

Price Is Right 
Lever alt 
Com Prod 

Stand Brands 



Fury 
Borden 



ran 

Concentration 

H«lnz alt Mllea 

Nablsoa alt 

Brillo 



December Bride 

Colgate 

Armstrong 



Lever 

Concentration 

Nestle 
alt Lever 
Heinz alt 



H. Ea.stinan 

December Bride 
Ck>lgat« 



Qffi HilU 

Concentration 

Pondi alt 
Bauer & Black 



WKllehall 

Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



Lever alt 



Lone Ranger 

Gen Mill s 
alt sust 



Circus Boy 

Miles alt sust 



um & wmsn 

Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



Truth or 
Consequences 

Ileinz 



pao 



Restless Gun 

Diackett 
Gen. Foods 



Love of Life 

Quaker alt Lever 

Amer Home 



mil 

It Could Be 

You 

Miles alt 

Nabisco 



Restless Gun 

Cahnnel Master 
Jrackett, Structo 



Love of Life 

Le\er alt sust 



Geo MlUi 



Ben Gay 
all I'&li 



Lunch With 
Soupy Sales 

Gen Foods 



Sky King 

Nabisco 



True Story 

iUlt 

atwllng Drug 



Could Be You 
Whitehall alt 

Nestle 



Love That Bob 

Block, Dusharme 

Aromur 

Drackett 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&O 



No net service 



S. C. Johnson 



Music Bingo 

sust 



Guiding Light 



Love That Bob 

Beech-Nut 

Gen Foods 

S. C. Johnson 

rmour^ Johnson 



No net service 



News 
(1:25-1:301 ...it 



P4Q 



No net service 



& J., Drackett 



Music Bingo 

sust 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&O 

C uidiMg Li ght 



Could Be You 
Stand Branch 

alt Oongoleum 



detective Diary 
Sterling Drug 



P&O 



No net service 



News 

(1:25-1:301 sust 



Kleinert 



No net service 



Mr. Wizard 

■ust 



No net service 



As the World 
Turns 
P&O 



No net service 



PUlubuij 

For Better Or 
For Worse 

Scott alt sust 



World Turns 
P&G 

Quaker 
uU Olii MUlu 



No net service 



Queen for a 
Day 
■ust 



Day In Court 

Drackett, 

S. C. Johnson 
Johnson & J. 



Queen-Day 

sust alt 
Congoleum 



Day In Court 

Armour 
r^ ett. Tonl 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

Lever alt sust 



Queen for a 
Day 

sust alt Ponds 



5. c. Joli. 

Gale Storm 

Johnson & 

Johnson 

3en Foods, Block 



l^UUaiV 911 !U!l 



The Thin Man 
sust 



MCAA Football 
Arrow Shirts 
Shlck. Esso. 
Humble Oil 

B lauJ. Oil l iii i i 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Gale Storm 

Drackett 

Gen Foods 

Beech-Nut. Lever 



Art Linkletter 

Kellogg 

PlUsburj 



alt Miles 



The Thin Man 

sust 



Art Linkletter 
Lerer Bro* 



Reynolds, (;oty 

Beat The Clock 

Lever, Drackett 
Gen. Foods 
Beech-Nut 



sust alt 
B taluj 



Bayuk. Gen 

Petrol. 

$98,000 H hr. 

[Mme and Talent 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



.lohhSon & J. 

Beat The Clock 
Drackett 

S. C. Johnson 
Gen. Foods 



Millionaire 

sust 



sust alt 
Quaker Oats 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

Supp Hose 



Millionaire 
OolgaU 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



Jotmson & J. 

Who Do You 

Trust? 

S. C. Johnson 

Listerine 
T?lnnlfi limmut*- 



Verdict Is Yours 

Sterling alt sust 

Van Camp 



-HSrao 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



The House on 
High Street 

sust 



Beech-Nut, Level 

American 
Bandstand 

Toni, Old 
London Foods 



■11 ARM 

Brighter Day 
P&O 



TBir 



AriHBur 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

S C. John.son 



Verdict Is Yours 

Gen. Mills alt 

sust 



Pen Mills 



8USI 

From These 
Roots 

sust 



Secret Storm 



The House on 
High Street 

Kleinert 

Culver alt P&O 



American 
Bandstand 

Rest F(KXis, I-cvet 
.\rmour, Luden's 



alt LiOTer 

Brighter Day 
P&G 

Secret Storm 

Amer Hmm. TrmJ T>c.r, ... t>„-... 



The House on 
High Street 

sust 



B? 



■TCT" 



Amer Home 



Split Personality 

Frigidalre 

alt sust 

Halnr alt- 



American 
Bandstand 

Vicks. Welch 

Pnlk \fillpr r;nt' 



Edge of Night Split Personality 
P&O Heinz alt 



Sterling 



Keepsake 

American 
Bandstand 

__JO;OJ>__^ 



TjBve^aT^WIes 



' I ' wi, L ' fl ty 

American 
Bandstand 

Gen. Mills 
7 rp 



PBIK MUlBf 



American 

Bandstand 

co-00 



alt Gen Mills 

Edge of Night 
P&O 

Amer Home 
alt 



Split Personality 

E E I. alt 

Wliitehall 



Sterling 



Lever alt 



Gold Seal 



Race of the 
Week 

■"■' 



All Star Coif 

>Iiller Brewing 
Reynolds Metal 



'JBA Basketball 

(5-7) 
Anheuser-Busch 



m WW. ) 
Bayuk (U Net) 



Rocky and 
His Friends 

Gen Mills 



Rin Tin Tin 

Gen Mills 
Cracker jack 
Louis Marx 



All Star Golf 



Robin Hood 

sust 



uled programs appearing during this period aro listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are: Tonight, NBC, 11:1.S p.m.-l a.m., 
Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday News 



Special, CBS, Sunday, 11-11:1.3 p.m.: Today, NBC, 7-9 
a.m.. Monday-Friday, participating: News CBS, 7:45-8 a.m. 
and 8:45-9 a.m., Monday-Friday. All times are Eastern 
Standard. 



MEDIA MEN 

I Continued from page 31 1 

Because clients wanted to communi- 
cate with media people working on 
their account, and agencies therefore 
had to have enough people to cover 
the bases, integrated departments and 
group systems have replaced the old 
specialist pattern." 

Mr. Godfrey predicts that "spe- 
cialists are on their way out, and are 
being replaced by media generalists' 
— people who know about several me- 
dia, who know specifics as well as 
generalities. Planning and strategy, 
he charges, are the tasks of general- 
ists instead of the buying specialists. 
"Agencies are looking for people who 
know their way around pretty well, 
and for those who know the values 
of all media." 

This explains why demand exceeds 
the supph : there just aren't enough 
bright generalists who want to stick 
with media. Harry W. Bennett. Jr.. 
partner in Robert Durham & Assoc, 
management consulting firm and spe- 
cialist in personnel recruitment, sees 
the day coming very soon when agen- 
cy management will take much more 
of an active interest in luring and 



lulling fears of these bright media 
generalists. 

He agrees that the media depart- 
ment has been upgraded, "but not 
enough. It certainly is one of the 
most maligned and neglected service 
departments." He sees several moves 
that will aid this upgrading. 

First of all, he thinks management 
will become more savvy in appoint- 
ing an executive agency officer in 
charge of personnel recruiting and of 
morale. 

"Management," in Mr. Bennett's 
opinion, "needs to weld department 
heads closer to the executive officers 
— to what agenc> chiefs are thinking 
and planning and to which way they 
are going. Top officers themselves 
can't direct all personnel and person- 
nel training because of heavy de- 
mands in account solicitation and in 
keeping business they have. 

"But media people, particularly, 
need to have a feeling of belonging 
and to develop the trust, security and 
other inspirations which make their 
jobs vital to them."' 

For the past 10 to 15 years, he 
comments, agencies have founded 
their operations on marketing and 




REALLY ROUNDIN' UP SALES! 



station 

WDSU-TV 
New Orleans 

WHCT 
Hartford 

KTVU 

San Francisco-Oakland 

KFBB-TV 

Great Falls, Montana 

WRGP-TV 
Chattanooga 

KHSL-TV 
Chico, California 

WSJS-TV 
Winston - Salem 

WGR-TV 
Buffalo 

WDAU-TV 
Scranton 

WOOD-TV 
Grand Rapids 

and many, many more! 



Signed up in '59 

5 Year Profit Plan 



5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 

5 Year Profit Plan 



...ancf really 
rackin' up raves: 

"The group of 123 
films is the best of its 
kind on the market 
today."— WFBM-TV, 
Indianapolis, April 9, 
1959. 

"Almost always sold 
out."— WFBC-TV, 
Greenville, S. C, 
April 28, 1959. 



mca 

TV FILM SYNDICATION 




research concepts. But he sees agen- 
cy management moving into an era 
where the pendulum swings back to 
the fundamentals of "who can write 
the best ads and place them in the 
best situation to make a real im- 
pact.' This, he contends, is the ques- 
tion clients will ask in selecting an 
agency. And agencies with the 
strongest and most vital media de- 
partments — working with, not under, 
copy departments — will provide the 
answer that brings in new billing. 

One characteristic which media 
people, in the main, do not have and 
which the\ need to foster is show- 
manship. One ad pro, commenting 
on what he terms a "general reces- 
siveness" in media people's person- 
ality, noted that Ben Duffy, currently 
board chairman of BBDO and former 
president, is an unusual exception to 
the rule that management people 
come from creative or account sec- 
tions. But. said the ad pro, "Duffy is 
rare because he was a media man 
with a sense of showmanship, a flair 
— a distinctive personality." 

Another commented on this same 
quality : "People expect copywriters 
and creative chiefs to ramble around 
Cloud 9 all the time. But they simi- 
larly expect media people to stick to 
their slipsticks — and media people too 
often encourage this stereotyped im- 
pression of sobriety, dullness and lack 
of imagination." 

It seems that media people do tend 
to be more sober and more intellectu- 
al than their so-called creative con- 
freres. But their actual creativity 
may far surpass that of the copy or 
art people. "We need to toot our 
own horns, ' said one media director, 
and he is working to promote himself 
and his staff to agency management. 

For many reasons, media people 
have formed a fairly small and inti- 
mate clique of their own. They know 
each other well, know immediately 
when there's a job opening, know 
what encourages some people to leave 
an agency and others to join it. 

That's why few media people get 
their jobs through employment agen- 
cies, says Ruth E. Bachman, adver- 
tising specialist at the Bing-Cronin 
employment agency. 

"Media people are very grapeviny, 
which is why employment agencies 
are usually the last resort in finding 
either people or a job. Media spe- 
cialists play a sort of musical chairs 
{Please turn to page 61) 



46 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




> 



i: 






• ♦. 



:^1 



iv. 



^ 



.^ 



^_>. 



I3iri 



in 





ATLANTA 



IN A 
MILLION 

(Atlanta now has a million population) 

WAGA-TV 



* 



IS 



LEADS ALL OTHER STATIONS 

Sunday through Saturday 10 pm to midnight-ARB 

BIGGEST BUY IN THE MARKET 

Saturday The Big Movie Double Feature at 11 pm 

BIG MOVIES 
BIG AUOIENCE • BIGGER SALES 

MORNING: The Early, Early Show-Mon. thru Fri. 9 am 
AFTERNOON: The Early Show-Mon. thru Fri. 5 pm 
NIGHT: The Big Movie-Mon.thruFri.&Sun.ll:15pm 





You know where 
you're going with 



WAGA-TV 



N^ 




Call KATZ 

a m^ m ^^ ^%^^W% station 

National Sales Offices: 625 Madison Ave.. N. Y. 22 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 






iu"^.\ 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



47 




ALWAYS... 
a jump ahead 



The vibrant enthusiasm of 
staying a jump ahead of our 
contemporaries is a vital part 
of all personnel at KONO 
in San Antonio. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
listeners' ears keenly tuned 
to the times . . . for first 
in news . . . finest in music. 

It's on enthusiasm that keeps 
San Antonio's largest radio 
audience buying at fever pitch . . 
day after day. 

For remarkable facts about the 
"jump-ahead" KONO . . . see your 

KATZ AGENCY 

REPRESENTATIVE 

5000 Watts • 860 KC 



KOhNTO 



JACK ROTH, AAgr. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 
48 




National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



^^g^m^m^ mm" INCB 1 'V %^ 



TV BUYS 

Chanel, Inc., New York: Placing saturation frequencies of prime 
lO's and 20's in 18-20 top markets for Chanel 5. Four-week sched- 
ules start late November. Buyer: Inez Aimee. Agency: Norman, 
Craig & Kummel, New York. 

Carter Products, Inc., New York: Planning to sponsor early and 
late evening 10. and 15-minute news shows for its toiletries and 
pharmaceuticals. Schedules start December in about 18 markets. 
Buyer: Greg Sullivan. Agency: Ted Bates & Co., New York. 
Norwich Pharmacal Co., Norwich, N. Y.: Getting schedules ready 
in top markets for Pepto-Bismol, to start 15 November. Buys are for 
six weeks; night minutes and chainbreaks. Buyer: Allan Hornell. 
Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 

Kayser-Roth Hosiery Co., New York: Going into 21 top markets 
for Supp-Hose hosiery starting in November for 13 weeks. Day and 
fringe night minutes are being used, about 20-25 per week per mar- 
ket. Buyer: Bernice Gutmann. Agency: Daniel & Charles, Inc., 
New York. 

Standard Brands, Inc., New York: Activity starts in November in 
about 36 markets for Fleischmann's Yeast. Six-week schedules are 
for daytime minutes and 20's using about 12 per week in each mar- 
ket. Buyer: Carrie Senatore. Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., 
New York. 

Stouffer Corp., Cleveland: Planning schedules in top markets for 
its frozen foods, with day and fringe night minutes and 20's. Flights 
are for six weks, start mid-November. Buyer: Mario Kircher. 
Agency: J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Block Drug Co., Inc., Jersey City: 13-week schedules to supple- 
ment their tv network buys stai:t 12 November for Rem cough medi- 
cine. Day minutes are being placed, averaging 20 per week per 
market. Buyer Al Sessions. Agency: Lawrence C. Gumbinner A. A., 
New York. 

American Tobacco Co., New York: Flights of day minutes are 
being set for Pall Mall in about 85 markets. Runs are for 16 through 
27 November; 11 through 24 December. Buyer: Fred Spruytenburg 
and Bob Bridge. Agency: SSCB, New York. 

Ceribelli & Co., Fairlawn, N. J.: Initiating new schedules 23 No- 
vember for Brioschi effervescent in about 15 top markets. Traffic 
and day minutes, ranging from 15 to 40 spots per week per market, 
are being used for six weeks. Buyer: Mary Dowling. Agency: 
Ellington & Co., New York. 

Schenley Industries, Inc., Norex Laboratories Div., New York: 
Kicking off traffic minute schedules in various markets for Amitone 
antacid; length depends on market. Buyer: Allan Reed. Agency: 
Grey A. A., New York. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



KOL 



is SeBttle! number 2 in a 



ser/es 



^///5- 



read , 

—I comment/ 



-^"^^ read 



M^*9 Stt th£> fr 
r* 'o Isrgr tft 

•o'e-rnur fto,elllD 

••• mart tr.m t»o 
•onett r^civitatt 





HO>/V MANY RADIO STATIONS 
HAVE THE GUTS TO DO THIS? 



"Potentially libelous" . . . this is what copy for 
KOL's last crusade was labeled. We were 
aware of this, but realized Seattle listeners had 
a right to know of the mis-handling of State 
Welfare Funds. Months were spent in research, 
cases of fraud were cited, figures read, accusa- 
tions and recommendations made. Daring? 
Yes, but this vigorous editorializing netted 
KOL great baskets of mail, plus added 
respect as a community leader. 



See your Boiling Co. Rep. -ask about Spokane's terrific buy-KLYK 




SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



49 



With agencies demanding easier buying, SPONSOR ASKS; 



How can stations streamline tiieir 




Crowing trend in radio/tv is to- 
ward a simplified rate card. Here, 
station men and a representative 
discuss procedure and method 

Thomas P. Chisman, pres.. W'VEC, 

Radio & Tv, Norfolk. Va. 

Basically, we siiiiplified our rate 
card by discarding all time periods 
such as class "A," Double "AA" etc.; 
utilized a single rate structure; pro- 
vided a built in discount arrangement 
similar to that used by newspapers; 



Estahlishijig a 
single rate 
structure is 
best method 



guaranteed our advertisers protec- 
tion against irregular spot announce- 
ment procedures and inaugurated an 
"announcement" schedule for com- 
mercials that gave our advertisers 
greater flexibility of scheduling. 

Equally as important as "how" we 
simplified our rate card is "why" we 
simplified it. With nine radio sta- 
tions engulfing the advertisers with 
an avalanche of rate cards — all dif- 
ferent — we decided to give the adver- 
tiser a rate card which he could read 
at a glance and could also see. at a 
glance, every discount plan we had 
and how he qualified for each. 

To get away from the hackneyed 
time classifications, "A " "B" etc. we 
created announcements, which paral- 
leled program time segments. These 
were announcements, feature an- 
nouncements and program announce- 
ments. Inasmuch as there was at the 
time we modified our rate card, no 
announcement shorter than 30 sec- 
onds, we fashioned ours as a 20-sec- 
ond announcement. The feature an- 
nouncement corresponded to the 30- 
second spot and the program an- 



nouncement to the minute com- 
mercial. 

We have found that the flexibility 
our announcement system gives is ex- 
tremely advantageous both to us and 
the advertisers, as we can mold the 
announcements for impact and sell- 
ing value and not be restricted to 
fining specific time slots. 

Our rate card clearly outlines the 
cost for each type of announcement 
based on the number of times used, 
and includes the built-in discount 
structure covering up to two years 
of commercial announcements. It is 
our only rate offering and we do not 
deviate from it under any conditions. 

We also established, along with 
these announcement breakdowns, a 
protection for the advertiser. To be- 
gin with, we never triple spot under 
any conditions. We double spot only 
in the announcement areas and never 
in the feature of program-announce- 
ment areas. By maintaining this as 
a strict policy, we have established 
an understanding with our adver- 
tisers regarding the type of treatment 
they can expect for their various an- 
nouncements. 

We've never had anyone complain 
our rate card was too complicated — 
and we hope to keep it that way. 

John P, Denninger, i>-P- and Eastern 
sales mgr., Blair-TV, New York 

Consider, if you will, a startling 
paradox. Television frequently offers 
units of appreciably different value 
for the same price. Can you think of 
another industry operating this way? 

For example, a spot following Sun- 
set Strip on most stations costs the 
same as, let's say, a spot following 
Music for a Summer Nite, since 
they're both in A A time. Unrealistic? 

Attempts to adjust to differing 
values in tv have included the un- 
workable "guaranteed" rating ap- 
proach, special summer rates, unpub- 
lished packages and rates protected 
for only "30 days." Yet none of them 
contribntps to rate card simplicity 




and more important, none really does 
the job of adjusting for good shows 
and average shows, as well as sum- 
mer and winter. 

Is there a simple, workable alterna- 
tive? We believe there is. The con- 



Two rate card 
levels in 
each time 
classification 



cept is one involving, basically, two 
rate card levels in each time classifi- 
cation — one simple flat rate ordinarily 
used for spots in high demand and 
one for spots that are not in such 
high demand. An advertiser buying 
at the lower cost, however, is subject 
to being moved to another spot after 
two weeks' notice, if someone buys 
his spot at the higher rate level. 

This concept goes a long way in 
allowing the traditional free play of 
the market place to lead realistically 
to the best possible buys for the ad- 
vertiser and the best possible rates 
for the station. The integrity of ap- 
proach provides compelling answers 
to the initial difficulties in working 
with this somewhat revolutionary 
card, and the many stations that have 
joined us in testing the concept feel 
it's well worth the extra effort on 
their part and ours. 

Tom Hamilton, gen. mgr., WNDU, 

South Bend, Ind. 

At WNDU we have tried to come 
up with a rate structure that can be 
transposed into a rate card as easy as 
possible to use. The rates themselves 
are designed to be "efficient" for an 
advertiser, yet profitable for us. 

This has been mainly a problem 
of deleting any elements of our card 
which are so infrequently used that 
they are obsolete for all practical 
purposes. With the advent of the 



50 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 




rate cards? 



music — news — sports pattern, with 
virtually the same format all day 
long, we first limited the time periods 
to only two: A and B time. The day 
was divided into A time from 6 a.m. 



Limit time 
periods to 
only two: 
A and B time 



to 9 p.m.. and B time thereafter. B 
time carried a rate 40% lower than 
A. Recently we have also removed the 
B designation, leaving a single rate 
for the whole liroadcast day. 

As the saturation idea developed 
more and more in spot buying, the 
package aimouncement section be- 
came the dominant feature of the card 
itself, but still only occupies a space 
of two by six inches in dimension. 

We first enlarged the bulk and 
package schedules with larger pack- 
ages and correspondingly increased 
discounts for both minutes and 20's. 
All plans are devised for a seven-day 
period and cover discounts for 15, 
25, 40 or 50 spots per week for maxi- 
mum flexibility. Time and tempera- 
ture signals take a flat rate of 14 
per announcement regardless of fre- 
quency. 

Broadcast rates for periods of one 
hour dow n to 20 seconds for the non- 
package purchase is covered in the 
normal way. with rates set up from 
one to 260 times. 

These two elements are all there are 
to our rate structure as such. A small 
back page of our card covers hours 
of operation, continuity, maximum 
contract length, et cetera and com- 
pletes the picture. Costs for any 
specials or remotes are handled in- 
dividually with the client. 

The cost, then, for a buy on 
WNDU can be ascertained in a 
matter of seconds. ^ 




SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



51 




930 



*•;»■ 






^i^ 



iSiV-^i 



'i^m: 






.•^i"'P" 



'V^^l 






In 

Oklahoma City 

the station 

with by far 

the 

Largest Audience 

is also 

the 

Prestige 

Station 



For 

39 YEARS 

the 

Undisputed Leader 

in 

OMahoma City 

Radio 



Call your 

Katz Man for the 

Audience & Coverage figures 



930 KG. 
Independent Modern PrGgramming 

Owned and operated by • . 

The WKY Television System, Inc. 
WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 
WTVT, Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Represented by the Katz Agency 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



31 OCTOBER 1959 

Omyrlght OSS 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The big, black quiz show headlines resume next week. 

Meanwhile, the lawmakers become more and more emphatic that something should be 
done, but more and more divided aoout what. 

In this situation, widening industry efforts to meet the situation on a voluntary basis 
might very well head off any action at all. 



There are, however, side effects. Attorney General Rogers has once again received the 
spur from President Eisenhower, despite Justice Department doubt that anything can be 
done about rigged quizzers by that agency. 

The Federal Trade Commission feels almost as much pressure as the FCC for action, 
any action. 

FTC chairman Kintner, with agreement from his fellow commissioners, resists the idea 
that the FTC's present powers to outlaw unfair methods of competition cover the quiz situa- 
tion. They don't see the argument that fixed quiz shows give one advertiser an un- 
fair advantage over his competitors, at least not as legal grounds for the FTC. 

Spokesmen at both agencies believe, however, that the mounting pressures may bring 
forth action in tlie broadcasting field. Not connected with the quiz show revelations, but 
action to prove the two agencies are awake. 

The FTC, for instance, might divert the pressure by putting a lot of manpower to work 
scanning claims for products in radio and tv, with the usual publicity fanfare. 

At the Department of Justice a peculiar situation prevails. Robert A. Bicks has been the 
major force in the antitrust division under two different antitrust chiefs. When the job again 
became vacant several months ago, it was assumed that Bicks would get it. 

Bicks was immediately made acting head of the antitrust division, and that is his exact 
position at this late date. No authoritative word has leaked out about a permanent man, but 
a suspicion begins to grow that Bicks just might not be tagged. 

It is founded on the fact that if the job had been intended for him there would have 
been no need for such a lengthy delay. The delay would even undercut Bicks if he does 
wind up with the job, since it indicates lack of enthusiasm in the choice. 

This is quite important in the tv picture, since it has been Bicks in the Justice Depart- 
ment pushing the idea that network option time is a per se violation of the antitrust 
laws, and that the networks may be monopolizing tv prt)graming illegally. And these are 
two fronts on which Attorney General Rogers may elect to move to provide some tv action 
in response to White House pressures. 

Although these are contradictory forces, and much can still depend on whether (a) 
Bicks gets the job, or (b) whether a new antitrust chief will still permit him to carry the 
ball. Justice Department action appears much closer as a result of the quiz scandals. 

Thus, ironically, the networks may suffer from scandals in which it has not yet even 
been charged that they had any part. The worst said thus far has been that they may not 
have moved fast enough to clean things up. With equal lack of logic, a situation which has 
produced charges that the webs may not have controlled programing tightly enough, now ap- 
pears likely to have speeded up action to loosen network control over programing. 



SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



53 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



31 OCTOBER 1959 
c«pyriaht issa 

SPON&OR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Today's typical advertiser in feature films is buying a balanced portfolio of 
announcements in other station availabilities as well, such as daytime and syndi- 
cation. 

Here's how Bruce Bryant, v.p. and general manager of CBS Tv Spot Sales, described 
the salient advantages of feature films: 

1) There's no entertainment risk; they're proven attractions. 

2) There's a favorable audience psychology in getting free what would cost the price of 
a ticket in a theater. 

3) When minutes are in demand, they can often be had in feature availabilities. This 
is especially important for saturation campaigns with new products. 

4) They have a low CPM through rotating audiences and frequency for buy- 
ers who don't need promotional or identification values. 



One syndicator bolstered its confidence (and budget) in a show it was making 
as a result of an ARB phone coincidental it ordered. 

After clearing a 10:30 p.m. time period on a network affiliate in a major market, the 
syndicator showed its pilot film and got a 67% aflSrmative response to a special query as 
to whether viewers wanted to see more episodes. 

Added charge for asking this question in the survey was $20. 



Brewery advertisers are discovering there's added mileage in film shows as 
enthusiasm builders for their own salesmen and distributors. 

Adolph Coors distributors and Stroh salesmen will both be targets of trade promotions 
by these sponsors of Ziv's Mackenzie's Raiders. 



Based on the ratings evidence of just one market — New York — it's possible to come to 
some tentative conclusions on how new syndication entries are faring in the rat- 
ings sweepstakes this season. 

There are 11 new syndication entries for which mid-October Arbitron ratings were avail- 
able; about half of them had ratings in a satisfactory point scoring range. 
Here's an analysis of the 15 leading syndicated shows: 

• Five were new entries: Grand Jury, Phil Silvers, Quick Draw McGraw, Lock-Up and 
Not For Hire. 

• Three were Hollywood theatrical product with moppett appeal: Popeye, Superman 
and Three Stooges. 

• Three were carryovers from past season: Mike Hammer, Highway Patrol and re-runs 
of Harbor Command. Two other carryovers were national spot: Huckleberry Hound 
and Death Valley Days. 

• Two were mid-season starters: Bold Venture and Brave Stallion. 
Some other factors were as follows: 

1) Ratings: Except for Mike Hammer's 27.3 score, the next 14 shows were tightly 
clumped in a ratings range of five points from 9.1 to 14.5. 

2) Stations: Of the 15 shows, WPIX had six, WRCA-TV had five, WCBS-TV had 
two, and WABC-TV and WNEW-TV one each. 

(For ratings on 15 top shows and 11 new entries, see WRAP-UP, page 61.) 



54 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



The "no man's land" between network and syndication in the film field is 
fast disappearing. 

It's become increasingly a matter of chance and circumstance as to whether a new show 
up for sale finds a network buyer or takes the alternate syndication route. 

Seven companies wearing both syndication and network hats this year are, alphabetically, 
ABC Films, CNP, MCA, ITC, Screen Gems, United Artists and Ziv. 

Furthermore, key strategy behind the move of Robert F. Lewine to CBS Films is the 
objective of breaking in as a major network supplier. 

Lewine's 1960 production plans call for eight shows with four of them initially to be 
regarded as syndication possibilities. 

The budget of a network show now runs $12,000 a week more to produce than its prime 
syndication counterpart, according to Lewine's estimate, with syndication in the $30,000-35,000 
range and network in the $40,000-45,000 bracket. 



Ziv chalked up added sales on both the first-run and re-run fronts last week 
largely through a wave of active station buying. 

Tombstone Territory first-runs went to 12 stations and four new advertisers, bringing 
total sales on the show to 54 markets. 

Highway Patrol re-runs were purchased by 63 stations. One station rep, Lloyd George 
Venard, said: "I can't ignore the series' record at re-run rates." 

(For details on advertisers and stations, see FILM WRAP-UP, page 60.) 



The experience of several companies that tried to break into syndication dur- 
ing the past 12 months only serves to reconfirm the belief that there are no short 
cuts in film production and sales. 

There appears to be little room for deviating from the complex but successful formula of 
(1) programing accepted types of shows, (2) filming in Hollywood, and (3) selling through 
an established sales force with agency and station contacts. 

Although it's possible for a syndicator to make progress while violating these rules, film 
men regard it as an uphill fight not worth taking on under most conditions. 



COMMERCIALS 

Pillsbury Mills' rush campaign for Halloween indicates the speed with which 
spots on video-tape can be hustled through production and out to stations. 

Tape was made at NTA Telestudios through Leo Burnett on Friday, 16 October. It was 
screened and approved the following Monday and shipped to 28 stations in 18 cities on Wed- 
nesday, 21 October. 

Telestudios ofi&cials called the job the first tv spot campaign via video-tape. (See 
station list in WRAP-TIP.) 



Music Makers has hired sound engineer Bill Schwartau to attempt to crack the 
obstacles of poor sound transfers in commercials prints. 

Typical of agency complaints is discontent on hearing optical sound tracks of conmiercials 
that sounded impressive on magnetic tapes. 

SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 55 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



31 OCTOBER 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A syndicator is moving to larger quarters and the fact that the new space is con- 
siderably more than it requires has provoked this trade speculation : 

It is getting ready to merge with another company in the tv field. 



The quiz mess is reminiscent, in one respect, of the terror that gripped many 
producing, directing, writing and acting people in the medium during the McCarthy and 
Red Channels reign. 

People associated with the quiz shows named in the Congressional probe are scared 
silly they will he treated as pariahs in selling packages or getting jobs. 



The radio side of the rep field, note timebuyers, appears to be undergoing quite a 
turnover in old associations. 

What they mean is that the real oldtimers — with 20 or more years of service — 

are being replaced by the settlement route with far younger and less expensive salesmen. 



Did you know that a dog — ^Lassie — ranks as one of the top "killers'* of the 
business? 

Definition of a "killer" among network and Madison Avenueites: A show that's proved 
itself invulnerable and you got to steer clear of, even with specials. 



This is directed to stationmen who make periodic visits to New York to hop up 
their reps about business and circulate among the timebuyers: 

Your rep, naturally, won't tell you but he thinks that because of today's me- 
thodical ways of setting up appointments with buyers you can pretty well cover 
the field in a day and a half. 

He realizes that the expense entailed in coming to New York inclines you to drag out 
your stay, but like Ben Franklin said, a good storyteller quits when he's through. 



During last week's NAB meeting in Boston a lawyer reviewed the possibility that 
the armed services might bite off a hunk of the choice channels and noted the seri- 
ous effect it would have on vhf as a whole. 

Piped up the operator of a uhf station: "And would that be bad?" 



56 



This is an example of how rumors start: 

Mathes inquired of CBS Radio about a piece of business it would like to place with' 
1 June as a starting date. 

The network responded that such confirmation would be contrary to normal operating 
procedure. 

Resulting rumor: CBS Radio won't take anything running beyond 1 June. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 19591 




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CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS 



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in teaming up with GILL-PERN A 

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Teamwork 
Tells 

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BOSTON 




SPONSOR • 31 OCTOBER 1959 



57 




NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



YOUTH LEADS WAY for motorcade through downtown Albany, N. Y., celebrating WRGB's 
2(Mh year. Combining anniversary theme with promotion for station's evening lineup of NBC 
shows, cars, each from one of 20 years, sported finalists in "Mrs. Total Television" contest 




ADVERTISERS 



The cigarette makers continue to 
pour it on for network tv. 

Brown & Williamson (Bates) 
bought 26 alternate weeks of Mr. 
Lucky (CBS TV) in behalf of its new 
Life brand and Liggett & Myers 
(McCann-Erickson) took a bigger 
chunk of Laramie (NBC TV), which 
is one of the few newcomer westerns 
showing signs of clicking. 

Laramie's now sold out for the 
balance of 1959. 

(For a look on how the new tv 
shows are doing according to types, 
see page 39 this issue.) 

General Mills this week reas- 
signed the following products 
among its advertising agencies: 

Betty Crocker Pancake Mix, now 
at D-F-S, and Betty Crocker Muffin 
Mixes, now at Tathani-Laird, to 
BBDO; and Red Band Flour and 
other regional flour brands, now at 
Knox Reeves. Minneapolis, to D-F-S. 

Oscar Fleckner, secretary and as- 



MR. & MRS. WESTERN, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, recently visited the WMCT, Memphis 
studio during telecast of their filmed show; were greeted by show's announcer Dick Hawley. The 
Rogers show, co-sponsored by Pepsi-Cola in Memphis, participated in city's Mid-South fair 



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REAL-LIFE CLOWNS, TOO! Time out for 
a European vacation didn't mean dropping 
the act to Klavan & Finch, WNEW, N. Y. 
personalities, who carry their antics aloft 




COMING — THE CRUD! Or so say (l-r) 
Bob Trow, Rege Cordic, Karl Hardman (Cor- 
dic & Co." on KDKA, Pittsburgh) about to 
unveil newest spoof — '61 Crudleigh car 



58 




sistant treasurer of the Shoe Corp. 
of America, observing the 10th an- 
niversary of Starmaker Revue on 
WLW-T, Cincinnati, noted: 

"It is timely for us, sponsors and 
broadcasters together, to constantly 
remind ourselves that with every pro- 
gram, with ever) commercial, we are 
entering a private domain; and that 
by so doing we accept the doctrine 
that "A man's home is his castle." 

Campaigns: 

• C. Schmidt & Sons is brewing 
the most ambitious advertising cam- 
paign in its 99-year history. The 
brewery's new ad theme (out of Ted 
Bates I "For the 1 man in 4 who 
wants the full taste of beer" will be 
concentrated in every major market 
on tv spot until saturation levels are 
attained. For this. Schmidt is rede- 
signing all its packaging and trade- 
marks. 

Also happening at Schmidt, these 
new executives brought into the com- 
pany recently: William Shine, as di- 
rector of marketing; Lincoln Allan, 
as advertising manager; Ernest En- 



gel, market research director and 
Charles Kokol, as manager of sales 
training. 

• The Bon Ami Co. has added 
the full Mutual Radio Network to 
their advertising schedule for a firm 
13-week period, with renewals. Con- 
tract covers .SO spots per week over 
approximately 450 radio stations, 
coast to coast. This network radio 
program is the second national air 
schedule for Bon Ami this fall. This 
month the company also started a 
.52-week participation on the nightly 
Jack Paar Shoiv, NBC TV. Agency: 
Cole, Fischer, Rogow. 

Note: Westinghouse Electric 
Corp. has agreed to a FTC consent 
order forbidding it to grant dealers 
discriminatorv prices or advertising 
payments. The FTC complaint al- 
leged that Westinghouse charged 
some dealers more than their competi- 
tors for the same electrical appliances 
and that the comapny did not make 
its promotional allowances available 
to all competing customers on pro- 
portionallv equal terms. 



They were elected oflicers of the 
Advertising Managers Organiza- 
tion: president, Lester Worden; 
v. p. -secretary, Irwin Kurtz and v.p.- 
treasurer. Fred Ravser. 



AGENCIES 



Kenyon & Eckhardt this week he- 
came the sole agency for the 
M-E-L division of the Ford Motor 
Co. with the acquisition of the 
Lincoln and Lincoln Continental 
account. 

K&E has been the agency for Mer- 
cury since January, 1958 and for 
Edsel since the fall of '.58. It will 
probably also be appointed for Ford's 
Comet, a small car to be introduced 
at the beginning of next year, and 
distributed by the M-E-L division. 

Lincoln and Continental, billing 
approximately $4 million, has been 
with Foote, Cone & Belding since 
last December. 



Other agency appointments: 




MEDIA MASTERS Benedict Gimbel, Jr., 
(I), pres. WIP; George Storer (c), pres., 
WlBG; Gilbert Seldes, dir. new Annenberg 
School of Communications, talk trade at 
Phila. bdcstg. execs luncheon honoring Seldes 



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BARE-LEGGED BOYS Joe O'Brien (I), Scott 
Muni, WMCA, N. Y. music personalities, put 
on plenty of cheek for packed house at first 
of record-hops series planned for N. Y. area 



STARRING Janet Blair, seated (upper right) 
next to Pittsburgh Mayor Thomas Gallagher, 
awaiting cue from WAMP's Davey Tyson at 
United Fund Appeal kickoff broadcast 




Cheseb rough-Pond's Pertussin 
brand line of cold remedies, billing 
SI million, to C-P"s Angel Skin hand 
lotion agency, Conipton . . . Also 
to Compton, the Chase Manhattan 
Bank account, billing $900,000, 
from K&E ... 5 Day Labs, billing 
about $1 million, to Doyle Dane 
Bernbach from Grey . . . George 
Wiedemann Brewing Co., billing 
$1.5 million, to Doherty, Clifford, 
Steers & Shenfield, from Tatham- 
Laird . . . C. Schmidt & Sons, Phila- 
delphia brewery, from Al Paul Lefton, 
to Ted Bates & Co. . . . Kermin's 
Frozen Food Sales Co., for its new 
frozen casseroles, to Hal Phillips & 
Associates, Los Angeles . . . The 
May Broadcasting Co. to Bozell & 
Jacobs, Omaha . . . Sanitary Farm 
Dairies, to Warren & Litzenberger 
Advertising, Davenport, Iowa . . . 
California Frozen Juice Co., Beverly 
Hills, to Cole Fischer & Rogow of 
the same city . . . Glamur Products, for 
its Easy Glamur rug and upholstery 
cleaner, from Grey to Riedl & 
Freede, Clifton, N. J. . . . Five new 
accounts to the Baltimore office of 
W. B. Doner & Co.: Aegean Prod- 
ucts. Fair Lanes, Inc., Bata Shoe Co., 
Hochschild, Kohn & Co. department 
store, and Port of Baltimore. 



Merger: Edward Robinson Adver- 
tising with Yardis Advertising Co., 
Philadelphia. 

New agency: Gunther Goldschmidt. 
formerly associated with Regal Ad- 
vertising, has formed Time For Ad- 
vertising, Inc. at 730 Third Avenue. 
New York, to specialize in radio and 
tv advertising. 

Meeting note: Broadcaster's Promo- 
tion Association convention in Phila- 
delphia on 2 November will feature 
speaker R. David Kimble, senior 
account executive at Grey Advertis- 
ing in a discussion on station trade 
advertising. Also speaking on this 
topic will be Henry J. Kaufman, 
president of the Washington, D. C. 
agency bearing his name. 

Awards: Bernard Duffy, vice 
chairman and former president of 
BBDO, the first annual George Buck 
Award of the Catholic Actors Guild 
for his "outstanding Catholicism and 
assistance to those in the theatrical 
and entertainment field." 



Personnel notes: Jules Bundgus, 

to v.p. and head of the radio/tv de- 
partment at Kastor, Hilton. Chesley, 
Clifford & Atherton . . . Richard Ja- 
cobs, to v.p. of Noble-Dury & Asso- 
ciates, Memphis . . . Carlos Franco 
to v.p. in charge of media and mar- 
keting and a member of the plans 
board at Swan & Mason, New York 
. . . Paul Visser, to account group 
supervisor for Gardner Advertising 
. . . Charles Allen, to business man- 
ager of the radio/tv department at 
Kudner . . . Jon Christopher and 
Ted Schulte, to the creative and 
radio/tv departments respectively of 
EWR&R . . . Frank Rolfes, time- 
buyer, Campbell-Mithun. Minneapolis 
. . . Rochelle Segal, to the radio/tv 
department of Wermen & Schorr, 
Philadelphia . . . James Lewis, to 
the radio/tv department of The 
Cramer-Krasselt Co., Milwaukee. 



FILM 



Intensified competition in the 
film field seems to be showing up 
in the financial reports of more 
than one of the syndicators. 

Official Films, for example, last 
week revealed it operated at a break- 
even point with assets of $2.3 mil- 
lion, labilities of $736,000, and oper- 
ating losses of $178,000 due to write- 
off of motion picture rights. 

Programs: Videoways, Inc. has 
made a tape pilot of Stars and Strikes, 
an audience participation bowling 
show with Paul Winchell. 

Sales : Sales of Bernard L. Schubert's 
War of Life to KOMO-TV, Seattle; 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia; WGAN-TV, 
Portland, and CKLW-TV, Detroit, 
brings the show to a reported total of 
42 markets . . . ITC's Four Just Men 
has grossed an announced $878,450 
abroad in 15 countries . . . UAA's 
features and cartoons to WOR-TV, 
New York; WN AC-TV, Boston; 
CKLW-TV. Detroit; WMAR-TV, Bal- 
timore: KHJ-TV, Los Angeles; 
WMAL-TV, Washington; WMTW- 
TV. Portland: WTVR. Richmond; 
KRSD-TV. Rapid City; WAFB-TV, 
Baton Rouge; KATV, Little Rock; 
WTVN, Columbus; KGGM-TV, Ab 
buquerque; KRDO-TV, Colorado 
Springs; KBOI-TV, Boise; KOIN-TV, 
Portland; and KTIV, Sioux City. 



More sales: Ziv's Tombstone Terri- 
tory sold to El Paso Federal Savings 
and Loan; Ideal Baking in Tyler, 
Tex.; Holsum Bread in Baton Rouge; 
Standard Humpty Dumpty Markets in 
Oklahoma City on WKY-TV, and to 
these stations: KSYD-TV, Wichita 
Falls; WFAA-TV, Dallas; WALA-TV, 
Mobile; KTVB-TV, Boise; KID-TV, 
Idaho Falls; KVII-TV, AmariUo; 
KLIX-TV, Twin Falls; WWL-TV. 
New Orleans; KPTV, Portland; KSL- 
TV, Salt Lake City; KOA-TV, Den- 
ver, and WKY-TV, Oklahoma City. 



Additional sales: Ziv's Economee 
unit reports re-run sales of Highway 
Patrol to these stations: WNTA-TV, 
New York; KTTV, Los Angeles 
WBZ-TV, Boston; WGR-TV, Buffalo 
WFAA-TV, Dallas; KPHO-TV, Phoe 
nix; WWL-TV, New Orleans; WCKT 
Miami: KPRC-TV. Houston; WTAE 
Pittsburgh; WFMY-TV. Greensboro 
WAVY-TV, Norfolk; WOSH-TV 
Portland; WOAI-TV, San Antonio 
KTNT-TV, Seattle; KMID-TV, Odes 
sa; WSJV-TV, South Bend; KHQ 
TV, Spokane; WTVT, Tampa; KYW 
TV. Cleveland; WSM-TV, Nashville 
WSB-TV, Atlanta: WKY-TV, Oklaho 
ma City; KVOO-TV, Tulsa; KTVU 
San Francisco; WKBM-TV, Indian 
apolis; WGN-TV. Chicaao; KSTP 
TV, Minneapolis; WTVN-TV, Colum 
bus; KETV, Omaha; KMJ-TV, Fres- 
no; WBRC-TV. Birmingham; KSL- 
TV, Salt Lake City; KFYR-TV. Bis- 
marck; WRKC-TV. Memphis; KLYD- 
TV. Bakersfield, and WALA-TV, 
Mobile. 

Commercials: HFH has moved to 
216 E. 49th Street in New York to 
obtain added studio space . . . Stations 
carrying Pillsbury's tape commercials 
made by Telestudios through Leo 
Burnett are: WJBK-TV and WWJ- 
TV, Detroit; WBBM-TV and WJN- 
TV. Chicago; WLW-TV, Cincinnati; 
KPLR-TV. St. Louis; KMSP-TV and 
WCCO-TV. Minneapolis; KTTV, 
KABC-TV, KNXT and KCOP-TV, 
Los Angeles; KPIX, San Francisco; 
WHDH-TV, Boston; WJAR-TV. Prov- 
idence; WTAE-TV, WIIC-TV and 
KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh; WSAZ-TV, 
Huntington; WISH-TV. Indianapolis; 
KMBC-TV and KCMO-TV, Kansas 
City: WHO-TV, Des Moines; KLZ- 
TV, Denver; KRLD-TV, and WFAA- 
TV, Dallas; KFMB-TV, San Diego, 
and KCRA-TV, Sacramento. 



60 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 19.59 



Strictly personnel: Irving Briskin 
and William Dozior elected to the 
board of directors of Screen Gems . . . 
Henry G. Plitt, ABC Films presi- 
dent, of! to the far east on business 
. . . Ralph Baron iiaiiied spot sales 
manager of ITS's Arrow Productions 
. . . Edwin J. Smith, former ABC 
Films international director, has re- 
signed . . . Fred Hamilton joins 
Ziv as executive producer. 

Ratings: Some indication of rat- 
ings trends came out of a mid-Octo- 
ber Arbitron study of New York City 
syndication. Here are the top shoAvs: 

1. Mike Hammer (WRCA-TV; 
MCA) 27.3 

2. Grand Jury (WCBS-TV; NTA) 
14.4 

3. Huckleberry Hound (Kellogg's) 
14.3 

3. Highway Patrol (WRCA-TV; 
Ziv) 14.3 

4. Bold Venture (WCBS-TV; Ziv) 
13.2 

5. Phil Silvers (WRCA-TV; CBS) 
12.4 

6. Brave Stallion (WPIX; ITC) 
11.8 

7. Meet McGraw {WPIX; ABC) 
11.7 

8. Death Valley Days (Borax) 10.8 

9. Popeye (WPIX; UAA) 10.1 

10. Superman (WPIX; Flamingo) 
10.0 

11. Three Stooges (WPIX; SO) 9.9 

12. Lock-Up (WRCA-TV; Ziv) 9.4 

13. Not For Hire (WNEW; CNP) 
9.1 

14. Harbor Command {W ABC; Ziv) 
9.1 

There were also Arbitron reports 
on several other new syndicated 
shows: 

This Man Dawson (WPIX; Ziv) 3.0 
Manhunt (WNEW-TV; Screen Gems) 

3.1 
Californians (WPIX; CNP) 1.4 
Trackdoicn (WPIX; CBS Films) 0.1 
Ding Dong School (WNTA; ITC) 0.6 
Deadline (WNEW-TV; Flamingo) 

0.6 



RADIO STATIONS 



Executives of WBT, Charlotte, 

were in New York last week for 

I a special presentation to agencies 

dubbed "Design For A Top Mar- 

1 ket." 



The presentation describes a new 
concept of markeling: a basic 
change from a city marketing to 
an area marketing concept. 

The study shows that the Standard 
Metropolitan Statistical Areas were 
not designed as marketing areas, since 
"one out of every three Charlotte 
customers comes from outside the 
SMSA." 

Continues the study: "There are 
undoubtedly many other area markets 
in the country which are underrated 
by the use of SMSA as the basic 
unit in market planning and bud- 
get appropriation. Others are 
overrated. These marketing puzzles 
can only be solved by a thorough 
study and determination of the over- 
all distribution of population in this 
nation, not just the greatest urban 
concentrations." 



Three RAB executives are off to 
the West Coast this week with a 
new approach for admen : 

They're going to present, to more 
than 100 advertisers and agency men. 



specific proposals for radio buys — 
instead of the "usual general pitch." 
"We've reached the point," noted 
RAB's Kevin Sweeney, "where it is 
possible to extend our proposal sys- 
tem to include regional sales calls. 
Now we can actually make a tangible 
suggestion, and draw a reaction." 



Air Trails stations promoted four 
general managers to v.p.'s last 
week : 

Arthur Haley, of WEZE, Boston; 
William Spencer, WKLO, Louisville; 
Dale Moudy, WING. Dayton; and 
Collis Young, of WCOL, Columbus, 
Ohio. 



Ideas at work: 

• No emancipation here: Lis- 
teners of WQAM, Miami have won 
for themselves a slave for a day — - 
their favorite d.j. Recently station 
held a contest asking audience to 
write in reasons for wanting a "slave." 
Here are some of the chores the d.j.'s 
are faced with: baby sit, do home- 
work, mail out 40,000 letters for a 



PULSE and HOOPER 
AGREE. ..CUTIE 
IS NUMBER THREE 
IN SEATTLE! 

"Cutie" color radio 910 in the-center-of-the-dial 
is the best radio buy in the Seattle area. Lowest 
cost per thousand! Complete merchandising plan! 
Grow with Colorful "Cutie" , . . 



KQDE 

SEATTLE 



ALpine 5-8245, ask for 

Wally Nelskog, Prcs., 

or contact FOIiJOE & Co. 

for availabilities! 




SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



61 



fund, do household chores, clean the 
windows and record a letter of the 
family to send to a son overseas. 

• To reduce careless driving: 

This week WCAO, Baltimore, begins 
its "Safe Driving Campaign." All 
drivers whose cars bear the station's 
bumper strips, and who are spotted 
by members of the panel in "con- 
spicuous" safe driving will be eligible 
for the grand prizes to be awarded in 
January. The prizes include a Falcon, 
a Corvair. and a Valiant. 

• Be prepared: Each year for 
the past 14 years, WOWO, Ft. 
Wayne has conducted a fire drill dur. 
ing lire prevention week that em- 
braced schools in an 80-mile radius. 
This year station alerted schools to 
listen to a fire prevention program 
during which time the alarm is rung 
• — the signal for all schools to conduct 
their own drills. WOWO staffers 
were at one school, airing the hap- 
penings. 

• While waiting for the food: 

Tait Cummins, sports director of 
WMT, Cedar Rapids and Jim Bower- 
master, promotion manager have de- 
veloped a double-barreled promotion 
gimmick which not only boosts the 
station but sells radio time as well. 
The bit: restaurant placemats describ- 
ing the Iowa football team plus an 
invitation to customers to enter a 
football guessing contest. The sales 
gimmick is that restaurants are given 
so many thousand in direct ratio to 
the amount of radio time they buy. 
Station salesmen report that the place- 
mats have added 1.5 new accounts for 
station. 

• On the public service front: 
WMCA, New York, is currently air. 
ing, nightly, a public affairs series, 
The Voice of Neiv York. The pro- 
grams include talks by Abba Eban, 
former Israeli Ambassador, plus such 
nightly topics as justice, exploring 
your child, and a pro and con subject. 

• Playing Bach to Bach: High- 
school football players found them- 
selves scrimaging last week to the 
music of Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. 
What happened was that the new 
transmitter of KXTR, Kansas City, 
only 50 yards from the school's stadi- 
um, was feeding a perfect signal into 
the public address system. To compli- 
cate matters further, a similar prob- 
lem popped up with the school's in- 
door system when for four hours the 



station's classical music programing, 
plus commercials, was heard through- 
out the school, including the library. 

• Record results: WJMO, 

Cleveland, proved that the most natu- 
ral place for a record shop to adver- 
tise is on radio. Store recently 
bought a saturation schedule on Ne- 
gro station's Mighty Mo Show. Re- 
sults, according to record shop own- 
er: "We've had as many as 5,000 
people a week purchase the disk 
WJMO spotlights and about 50% of 
them making additional purchases." 

• Off to say 'Aloha': Fifty- 
seven Rochester people are paying a 
total of $43,035 to join d.j. Ed 
Meath, of WHEC on a two-week tour 
of Hawaii. The trip came about as 
a result of a one-month promotion 
for an airline and three travel agen- 
cies on Meath's program. 

• More proof of radio's pull: 

WERE, Cleveland, staged a special 
showcase program last week featur- 
ing the RCA album, "60 Years of 
Music America Likes Best." Listen, 
ers were invited to telephone the sta- 
tions to order copies of the album. At 
the end of the three-hour broadcast, 
a total of 1,231 albums had been or- 
dered and the next day, some addi- 
tional 250 orders were phoned in. 



Thisa 'n' data: Less than 60 days 
after going fulltime, WICE, Provi- 
dence, reports it was "in the black" 
during nighttime hours during the 
third quarter . . . Under construction: 
new radio facilities for WLBZ, Ban- 
gor and WKVT, Brattleboro, Vt 

Anniversary : WEOK, celebrating its 
10th year of broadcasting to the 
Poughkeepsie-Hudson Valley area . . . 
Kudo: WBZ & WBZA, Boston, a 
citation from the Boston City Federa- 
tion of Organizations for its hour-long 
documentary. Pornography: the Busi- 
ness of Evil. 

Add random notes: KING, Seat- 
tle, named an Army mascot as its 
"Dog of the Year," awarding it the 
"KING Dream Dog House" . . . 
WBAB, Babylon, is in the throes of 
conducting a teenage band competi- 
tion . . . Operations of Bartell Fam- 
ily Radio's national programing is 
being moved from KCBQ, San Diego, 
to WADO, New York. Al Heacock, 
national program director, will con- 



tinue to head the department . . . 
KXYZ, Houston, has a new contest 
going: prizes awarded to listeners 
sending in the correct combination 
to the "XYZ Song Safe" . . . WAFM, 
Miami, took to the air last week, 
beaming a fine music format to the 
fm audience . . . KJAX, Santa Rosa, 
is inviting timebuyers at every major 
San Francisco agency to join the sta- 
tion in a champagne toast for becom- 
ing "Santa Rosa's most listened to 
station." 

Anniversary notes: Builders of 

South Florida, on WCKR, Miami, 
begins, this week, its 10th year under 
the same sponsor, Florida Power and 
Light Co. . . . WHER, the all-girl sta- 
tion in Memphis, celebrating its 
fourth birthday. 



Station staffers: George Mamas, 

to v.p., general sales manager, WCUE, 
Akron . . . James Richey, to sales 
manager, KMUR, Salt Lake City . . . 
John Gilbert, named sales man- 
ager of WBZ & WBZA, Boston-Spring- 
field . . . Phil Meltzer, station man- 
ager, KSDO, San Diego . . . Wil- 
liam Sherry, manager, WVOX, New 
Rochelle, N. Y. . . . Wallace Dun- 
lap, manager, WFYI, Mineola-Gar- 
den City, L. I. . . . Richard Powers, 
commercial manager and promotion 
chief, WCMS, Norfolk , . . Jack 
Powers, news director, WADO, New 
York . . . Arthur Wittum, manager 
of advertising and promotion, KNX- 
CRNP, Los Angeles . . . Larry 
Fischer, program director, WKMH, 
Detroit . . . Morna Campbell, to 
the news staff, WTOP, Washington, 
D. C. . . . John Haley, to the sales 
staff, WTAR, Norfolk . . . Gene 
Werman, account executive, WCAE, 
Pittsburgh . . . John Cofoid, assist- 
ant sales promotion manager, WLS, 
Chicago . . . Jack Taylor, to local 
sales account executive and James 
Kissman, national sales and promo- 
tion, KBIG, Hollywood. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



H-R Tv, Inc. yesterday (Friday) 
held its second annual promotion 
workshop, in New York, for pro- 
motion managers of its repre- 
sented stations. 



62 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



The all-day seminars and workshop 
sessions included a series of talks by 
H-R promotion, research and sales 
executives, followed by discussion 
and question periods, and routul-robin 
and panel discussions. 



Weed Radio Corp. has appointed 
two to its New York office: Henry 
Simmen, to Eastern sales manager 
and David Harris, account executive. 

Rep appointments: KDWB, Min- 
neapolis-St. Paul and KTHT, Hous- 
ton, to Avery-Knodel . . . also to 
A-K: KRKD, Los Angeles and 
WATV, Birmingham . . . KOWH 
Omaha, to Daren F. McGavren Co. 
. . . WRFM, New York, to Good 
Music Broadcasters . . . WCOV-TV, 
Montgomery, to Venard, Rintoul & 
McConneli. 



Social note: Peg Stone, president 
of Radio/Tv Representatives, Inc., 
left, last week, for an extended busi- 
ness trip in Europe and the Near East. 

Rep appointments — personnel : 
Ronald Buebendorf, to assistant 
director of sales development and re- 
search for George P. HoUingbery 
. . . Mike McNally, to the San 
Francisco office of Daren F. McGav- 
ren . . . William Keup, to the Chi- 
cago tv sales staff of the Katz Agency 
. . . Sidney Cartner, to Chicago 
radio account executive for PGW . . . 
Jerry Lyons has parted from Weed 
after an association of 22 yearg. 



TV STATIONS 



I Kick-off" session of the 1959-60 
Radio and Tv Executives Society 
Timebuying & Selling Seminar 
I , in New York will be 17 November. 

Feature of the first meeting will be 
a discussion of "Television Program- 
ing — Its Problems and Prospects," by 
David Levy, NBC v. p. of program 
I and talent and C. Terrence Clyne, Mc- 
Cann-Erickson senior v.p. in charge 
of radio and tv. 



Ideas at work: 

• A word to the wives is worth 
more than a letter across the 
desk: WCAU-TV, Philadelphia re- 



cently employed a novel sales pro- 
motion aimed at the wives of key 
coff'ee buyers in the area. The idea: 
each wife received a package of Max- 
well House coffee, a percolator and a 
15 rpm recording of "The Sound of 
Ground"— the background music of 
MH's commercials. The enclosed let- 
ter tells the wives: "This is our way 
of letting you know the Maxwell 
House coffee is helping to increase 
your husband's business." 

• Promoting a vacation-land: 
WMTW-TV, Poland Spring, Me., 
just concluded its three-week promo- 
tion aimed at Canadian viewers, plug- 
ging Northern New England as a 
prime vacation site. The promotion, 
using more than 100 spots, included a 
contest spotlighted in a special film 
program — Cinema International — 
offering a three-week expense-paid va- 
cation as prize. 

• The big movie landed the big 
job: A dark bourse political candi- 
date, Julian Lane, transferred almost 
all his ad budget to WTVT, Tampa, 
and became the mayor of the city. 
According to agency Hilton & Grey, 
which directed Lane's campaign: "In 
our estimation the pay-off was in buy- 
ing two 60-second commercials within 
WTVT's Big Movie in prime time on 
Wednesdav evenings." 



Thisa 'n' data: Storer Broadcast- 
ing Co. reports a nine months" earn- 
ing figure of $1.45 per share com- 
pared with 11^ per share for the same 
period, 1958. Net profit after taxes 
came to $3,580,268 compared to 
$264,782 for the first nine months, 
1958 . . . Operation "Facelift" is 
underway for KXTV, Sacramento, as 
its present building is being complete- 
ly rennovated. 

On the personnel front: Philip 
Beuth, to promotion manager for 
WROW and WTEN-TV, Albany . . . 
Bill Beindorf and G. Gerald Dan- 
ford, to the sales staff of WCBS-TV, 
New York . . . Don Ross, news direc- 
tor, WXEX-TV, Richmond-Peters- 
burg . . . E. Holland Low, to ac- 
count executive for WWLP, Spring- 
field, Mass. . . . Robert Fairbanks, 
account executive, KNXT, Los 
Angeles . . . James Mathis, account 
executive, WFBM-TV, Indianapolis 
. . . Jack Sullivan, promotion direc- 
tor, KIRO-TV, Seattle. ^ 



AVAILABLE 

Corporate Broadcast 
Executive 

with achievenicnt record 
(one company cijihtccii 
years) including organiza- 
tion, administration, and 
government liaison. This 
man has particular strength 
in the communications field 
from close association with 
all media — radio, television, 
newspaper, magazine. 

Just completed assign- 
ment in tv/radio broadcast 
field which entailed expert 
Congressional testimony. 

Age 56. Married, three 
children. Previous compen- 
sation $30,000.— $50,000. 

Offers special experience 
and ability for merger-con- 
solidation — expansion activ- 
ities to broadcast companies. 

For personal meeting. 
reach this man through 

Box 18 

Sponsor Magazine 
40 East 49th Street 
NewYork, 17, N. Y. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



63 



MEDIA MEN 

[Continued from page 46 1 

game, moving laterally from equal 
joh to equal job rather than upward 
within their own shops. And the same 
people are doing the moving; they 
shuffle around every once in a while 
but seldom do new people at higher 
levels seem to enter the job pool.'" 

As the agency business enhances 
the stature of the media people it now 
has, and builds attractions for new- 
comers to the media fold, media units 
will gain the necessary strength to 
conduct mature account planning and 
placement of schedules. An increas- 
ing number of media specialists is 
sitting in on account planning ses- 
sions as well as with the clients. 

More buyers than ever before are 
turning their backs on "formulitis ' 
and thinking about the broad-sweep 
problems before settling down to 
cost-per-thousand buying. Manage- 
ment is recognizing this — albeit slow- 
ly — which is why $12,000-a-year 
buyers are becoming more prevalent 
and $5,000 buyers are diminishing. 

Media prices for good talent are 
about the same in the three major 
buying areas — New York, Chicago 
and Detroit. But, say the ad pros, 



once you're out of these market areas 
you get into agencies where there's a 
single buyer who does everything in 
media — and for $125 a week. 

These non-major-market patterns 
are changing too, however. Smaller 
agencies must build their media staffs 
to keep the accounts they have. To 
maintain billings as well as reputa- 
tion, they're following the bigger-city 
trend toward establishment of a firm 
media base with well-rewarded media 
executives. 

Every agency, as television con- 
tinues its phenomenal and complex 
growth, is necessarily re-evaluating 
the huge sums of money which it is 
investing in the medium on behalf of 
its clients. It is also re-studying the 
people who are responsible for the 
placement of that money. 

The agency's biggest safeguard or 
insurance: developing and attracting 
media professionals who have the ca- 
pacity to be generalists as well as spe- 
cialists, and who are respected as in- 
tegral and thinking forces within the 
agency operation. As specialists, they 
will advance media know-how for 
maximum return. As generalists, 
they'll also have the knowledge of a 
well-rounded ad pro. ^ 




WBNS Radio 

Columbus, Ohio 

John Blair & Co., Representatives 




Pulse asked, "If all but one station 
were to go off the air, what station 
would you prefer over any other to 
remain?" 34.3% chose WBNS, beating 
number two by 11.7%, and number 
seven by 36.1%. 



NIELSEN 

{Continued from page 29) 

ments will continue in the first 50 
markets. 

For advertisers, the enlargement of 
NSI means that a national account 
using NTI, NSI and NCS all together 
will be able to get a picture of his 
campaign in total and in texture, tex- 
ture being the individual parts that 
make up the picture. 

Across the border plans also in- 
clude a local market expansion of 
the Nielsen Broadcast Index by A. C. 
Nielsen of Canada Ltd. Heading the 
subscriber list for the new package 
are P&G, J.W.T. and the Canadian 
Broadcasting Company. 

For radio advertisers, the good 
news is that the NCS #4 scheduled 
now for the winter of 1960 and '61 
will include radio studies for the first 
time since 1956. 

Behind the selection of next winter 
for NCS #4 was a Nielsen poll of 
agencies, advertisers and stations. 
Commenting on the results of this 
poll, Churchill said, "The spring 1960 
U.S. Census of both radio and tv 
home-counts by county, with release 
scheduled for mid-1961, has appar- 
ently led to a preference for a some- 
what delayed but more precise Cen- 
sus-based coverage study. Approxi- 
mately a third of our customers voted 
for a measurement next spring, while 
the other two-thirds were almost 
equally divided between scheduling 
for late '60 or early '61. 

"Acting on this, we will offer com- 
plete nation-wide NCS 4;t4 studies of 
both radio and tv stations no later 
than spring of 1961. In the mean- 
time, new stations, or those with ma- 
jor facility changes since the latest 
NCS measurement, may order interim 
measurements for their own areas 
through our special research facilities 
during the February-April 1960 
cycle." 

NCS is designed as a counterpart 
of print media's delivered circula- 
tions, represents the accumulated 
listeners to a station without specific 
reference to the program features 
that attract them. 

Meanwhile, ticking away on the 
16th floor of 575 Lexington Ave. in 
Manhattan, is the minute-by-minute 
proof of the research firm's expansion 
— the Instantaneous Audimeter which 
could spread to other top markets if 
stations and advertisers want it. ^ 



64 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



Hoiv to put in a full day's ivork 

. . . before breakfast 



Quaker Oats has to get its work 
in before breakfast or it's too 
late. So Ad Director, Robert 
Macdonald, developed a philos- 
ophy anyone can use— "Do it 
now ! Do it yesterday ! But don't 
put it off until tomorrow!" 

It's a formula that looks to the 
future and, for that reason, 
leads very naturaUy into selling 
more than just product. 

Develop a personality. 

Mr. Macdonald feels that in- 
corporating public interest 
messages in product advertis- 
ing is an excellent way to pre- 
pare today for tomorrow. 

"It helps develop a friendly, 
likeable corporate personality," 
he says. "And this is just as 
important as building a favor- 
able franchise for consumer 
product. A favorable corporate 
image makes it easier to get 
credit in financial circles, to 
attract rehable personnel and 
makes our own shareholders 
and employees feel that their 
company is unselfishly inter- 
ested in the nation's welfare." 

"And," adds Mr. Macdonald, 
"do it now, or it wiU be more 
difficult later." 

What was done? 

Mr. Macdonald asked his top 
management to get behind the 
Advertising Council ... to in- 
corporate Council public serv- 
ice projects in all advertising of 
Quaker Oats products. 

Figures from October '56 
through January '59 show how 
massive the program has been. 
Newspaper circulation carrying 
Quaker Oats ads in support of 
Council causes was 130,585,940; 
magazine circulation, 244,713,- 
016; home impressions on TV 
and radio were 259,357,600 on 
network programs alone. 




You can benefit, too. 

You can help your company 
build a more favorable corpo- 
rate image. Include Advertising 
Council drop-ins in your regu- 
lar advertising; use a Council 
advertisement instead of "Com- 
pliments of a Friend" in your 
yearbook advertising; see that 
Council campaign posters are 
on bulletin boards in all your 
offices and plants. 

The advertising materials — re- 
production proofs, newspaper 
proofs and mats, posters, copy 
for radio and TV spots, etc. — 
are free. The current campaigns 
are: 

Aid to Higher Education 

Better Mental Health 

Better Schools 

Crusade for Freedom* 

Forest Fire Prevention 

Red Cross* 

Register, Contribute, Vote* 

Religion in American Life 

Religious Overseas Aid 

Stop Accidents 

United Fund Campaigns* 

United Nations* 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

*Not year-round campaigns 

For more information send in 
the coupon below, or call the 
Advertising Council branch 
office nearest you. Branches in 
Chicago, Los Angeles and 
Washington, D. C. 





-1 
1 


THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC., 
25 We5f 45th Street, ^jxSlNG . 
New York 36, New York £^tf^%. 
Please tell me how to tie • ^LjSf ' 
In with the Council. ^^^^^ 


NAME 




COMPANY 




ADDRESS 






.J 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



65 



PROMOTION PROBLEM 

{Continued from page 35) 

40% of the people at least once). 

^'Gross weight — the total tonnage 
of messages that we put into a market 
for a given period of time, regard- 
less of whether we are talking to one 
person five times or five people once. 

'^''Continuity — the principles of con- 
tinuing impact over a period of time. 

"We cling to the theory that it is 
easier to make two sales by reaching 
four people 10 times than by reach, 
ing 10 people four times. . . 

"When funds are limited, it is sim- 



ply not possible to reach everybody. 

"If you do succeed in doing that, 
you will have expended all your dol- 
lars in the doing of it, and it is im- 
possible to obtain any frequency. 

"Accordingly, the better part of 
valor is to seek out some segment of 
the market that judgment says is po- 
tentially fruitful. Go after this mar- 
ket. Concentrate on it. Not neces- 
sarily exclusively. . . In this way, you 
waste as little as possible of your pre- 
cious advertising dollar. Concentrate 
on a group." 

This is only one of several media 



Kalston Purina^s Dollar 
Buys More on WKOW 



-: OUUMOIEMIIK. MEATGRdESeS .- 



"We at Ralston 
Purina look upon 
Roy Gumtow, 
WKOW Farm Di- 
rector, as another 
salesman on our 
team. His calls on 
dealers and his re- 
corded interviews 
with consumers have 
added greatly to the 
effectiveness of our 
advertising on 
WKOW and 
WKOW-TV." 

Russel E. Thomas 
Sales Manager 
Wisconsin Division 
Ralston Purina Co. 



"Our thanks to you, your dealers, and your company, Mr. 
Thomas, for your confidence, and for this opportunity to 
prove again that WKOW and WKOW-TV sell best where they 
buy the most." 

Ben Hovel 
General Manager 
WKOW— WKOW-TV 




WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 




approaches that could be applied. 
The important thing to note is that 
once you employ reach and frequen- 
cy principles as basic ideas, vou are 
in a position to formulate on-the-air 
and print schedules in an orderly 
way with concrete circulation and im- 
pact goals to guide your planning. 
You now have a way of determining, 
for example, how many prime time 
and fringe spots you will need to 
reach effectively the audience for that 
new western series. You can, in ef- 
fect, develop your own promotion 
version of the sales department's an- 
nouncement plan. 

The copy strategy — When you are 
working on a consumer brand cam- 
paign, your copy starting point is a 
description of the product known as 
the copy platform. Obviously, the 
television copy platform is a thing of 
great complexity, since there are so 
many individual brands to worry 
about. If the promotion man knew 
the essential characteristics of each 
of these brands he would be in a 
stronger position than he is today in 
knowing what sales points to empha- 
size. We are really concerned here 
with the question of what kind of 
satisfaction or service the program 
product provides the consumer-viewer. 
Is it escape, laughter, a deep emo- 
tional experience? And how do the 
satisfactions provided by westerns, 
mysteries, comedy programs differ? 
Research, obviously, offers the only 
opportunity to come up wth meaning- 
ful answers. With those answers, the 
promotion writer could sharpen his 
copy greatly, for he would be in a 
position to highlight the most impor. 
tant product benefits to the viewer. 

The problem is critical when a 
preicous 10 seconds are all one has 
to do a job with. What is most im- 
portant: Show title? Star names? 
Content? There is seldom time to do 
much more than go one's own tried 
cliche route. It would be an enor- 
mous asset to an on-the-air promo- 
tion writer to have at his fingertips a 
guide — not a rigid formula — in the 
form of substantiated research find- 
ings testifying to the effectiveness of 
copy appeals related to program 
types. 

Research and media plans — Clear 
ly, there is a need for research, ofj 
which there is an appalling lack in 
the promotion field. The following ar 
just a few of the media questions 
that need investigation: 






66 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 195< 



What is the relation between length 
of announcement and type of pro- 
gram? For example, can a star- 
studded one-shot or variety program 
be effectively promoted in a lO-sec- 
ond spot, or would that period be 
more productive if devoted to a west- 
ern? What is the best way to use a 
minute period, and for what kind of 
program? There is no reason why 
all announcement lengths should be 
equally well-suited to all program 
types. Only the careful, unbiased 
methods of the researcher can lead 
to reliable answers. 

On-the-air promotion today em- 
ploys a variety of devices designed 
to overcome time and budget limita- 
tions. They range from two-second 
video-only announcements to equally 
brief audio promotion spots. This 
raises the interesting, and far from 
academic, question of how much in- 
formation an audience can absorb in 
a brief time period, of eye-versus-ear 
values in relation to the television 
screen. 

A question arising directly from 
the media approach: How many im- 
pressions are required to produce 
consumer action — that is, to get the 
prospect to try the show? Is there a 
minimum below which it is a waste 
of time and effort to promote at all? 
And how many programs can be suc- 
cessfully promoted in any one cam- 
paign? 

There are similar questions that 
arise in connection with newspaper 
space. How large should the ad be? 
Should you use a few large ads, or 
more small ones? Does position on 
the page count? What kind of head- 
line, copy appeal, visual treatment 
registers best? The questions are end- 
less, for they duplicate the questions 
that have been asked for decades 
about consumer print advertising. 
Little progress will be made toward 
finding useful answers until the tech- 
niques of print research are put to 
work by enough people long enough 
to produce validated findings. Until 
then, one man's opinion is as good 
as another's. 

All this is not to charge that no- 
body is doing anything. A number of 
studies have indeed been made. There 
have been several attempts to evalu- 
ate media as such. These seem to 
agree that on-the-air, itself, is the 
most effective promotional medium. 
One station recently announced that 



as a result of a slu(i\ it had com- 
j>uted, it intended to abandon news- 
paper promotion entirely. Whether 
this is an extreme point of view only 
further research can demonstrate. In 
the meantime, the management has 
something to go by that is objective, 
instead of its own understandable 
media bias. 

To the busy, harried, frantic pro- 
motion man, beset by a horde of 
shows, clients, agencies and a de- 
manding management, much of this 
may appear remote from realities. 

But promotion men feel the need 



lo grow professionally as is evident 
in the formation of Broadcasters 
Promotion Association and in the 
enthusiasm with which its members 
around the country ])lan and work 
for it. The seminars, the sharing of 
ideas, the arguments — all are part of 
the process of self-education the pro- 
motion field is now going through. 
With the competitive stakes so enor- 
mous and the promotional investment 
continually growing, it may not be 
too long before the ideas of the media 
scholars find their way into the razzle- 
dazzle world of promotion. ^ 



Beam your sales message to 



DULUTH- 
SUPERIOR 



the 




LARGEST 
MARKET 



in both Minnesota and 
Wisconsin 



Zooming sales have made the 
Ports metropolitan area the 
largest market in size only to 
Twin Cities in Minnesota and 
waultee in Wisconsin. 

In WDSM-TV's coverage area 
800,000 people, spending over I 
lion dollars* annually. 

You can best sell, best adver- 
tise to this growing industrial, 
shipping and vacation center 
by using WDSM-TV . . . 

*SRDS 5/10/59 




AT THE HEAD OF THE SEAWAY 

4 WDSM-TV 

^^^ DULUTH, MINN. NBC SUPERIOR, WISC. 

PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. ffc^a faBBUM M WAYNE EVANS & ASSOC. 

EXCLUSIVE NATL. REPS. »-F3A»«MW*wi« REGIONAL REPS. 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



67 



IVSYR Delivers 85% 
IVIore Radio Homes 
Than The IMo. 2 Station 

In an area embracing 18 counties, 402,670 
homes, 1.5 million people with a $2.5 
billion buying-power . . . 

>VSYR DELIVERS 
IVIORE HOMES 
THAN THE NEXT 
TNVO STATIONS 
COMBINED 




Top programming Top facilities ) 
Top personalities make the cJifference. 

*AII figures NCS No. 2, weekly coverage 




Represented Noltonolly by 
THE HENRY I. CHRISTAl CO., INC. 

HIM rota • tOSIOM • CHICAGO 
otrton • 





WTHITV 

CHANNEL 10 • CBS— ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 

Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 



68 



Tv and radio 
NEWSiVIAKERS 




Crawford Paton has joined McCann- 
Erickson's newl) formed media division as 
vice president and manager. Formerly 
director of market planning at Warner 
Bros., Paton was also associated with NBC, 
as sales and market analyst, Young & 
Rubicam, as director of market research, 
and C. J. La Roche & Co. as v.p., director 
of research and account executive. Forma- 
tion of the media division in the home office, combines Mc-E's media 
dept. and media planning unit, under their present management. 

Edwin Arthur Snow, has been elected 
vice president of advertising at Procter & 
Gamble. He joined P&G in 1933 and there- 
after advanced to the posts of brand man- 
ager for various products, associate promo- 
tion manager and promotion manager. In 
1957 he was named manager of the adver- 
tising department. Extra-curricularly, Snow 
is active in various Cincinnati civic organi- 
zations concerned with urban redevelopment and housing. He is 
a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Business School. 



Sherman Gregory becomes president of 
the newly formed Pictafilm, Inc. A well- 
known executive in tv for the past seven 
years, Gregory has been associated with 
ABC Films, Inc., Triangle Stations, TV 
Guide and Campbell Soup Co. Formation 
of Pictafilm makes available in the U.S. a 
fast, economical film process for tv film 
commercials originated in Toronto. It pro- 
a single step the 35 mm negative, eliminating all other steps 
the original camera footage and the final optical negative. 





duces in 
between 



Charles J. Sitta has been appointed presi- 
dent of the Knorr Broadcasting Corp. Sitta 
launched his radio career in Detroit in 1946, 
and six years later joined Knorr as a sales 
representative. He was also given the 
assignment of starting Michigan Spot Sales, 
Inc., an advertising sales firm, and will 
continue as its president. A native of St. 
Paul, Minnesota, Sitta has lived in Bir- 
mingham, Michigan for 31 years. He is a former captain in the 
Army, where he served in the European Theater during World War II. 




SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 







VANCOUVER 



VICTORIA 




Look who's selliog 
on KVDS TV 

The KVOS contour reaches 262,000 B.C. homes plus 
82,000 homes in Northwest Washington. 



Alberta Meats 


Drano 




Max Factor 




Quaker Oats 


Alka-Seltzer 


Enos Fruit Salts 




Maybelline 




Rock City Tobacco 


Andrews Liver Salts 


Ex Lax 




McCormicks Biscuits 


Rootes Motors 


Aunt Jemima Pancake Flour 


Fawcett Ranges 




Mennen 




Rothmans Cigarettes 


Avon Products 


Feen-A-Mint 




Minute Maid 




Royal City Foods 


Bactine 


Fels Soaps 




M)B Coffee 




Salada Tea 


B.C. Tree Fruit 


Fishers Flour 




Nabob Foods 




Sanka 


Bonus Foods 


Fizzies 




National Carbon 




Saran Wrap 


Bosco 


Folgers Coffee 




Nescafe 




Scaly Mattress 


Campbell Soups 


French's 




Noxzema 




Shell Oil 


Canada Nut 


General Paint 




Nytol 




Shulton 


Canada Safeway Stores 


Cerber Baby Foe 


ds 


Old Dutch Potato 


Chips 


Simpson Sears 


Canadian Western Ins. 


Great Northern 


Railway 


Omega Oil 




Spoolies 


Carter Products 


Grey Dunn Biscuits 


One-a-Day Vitamins 


Star Weekly 


Arrid 


Hazel Bishop 




Pacific Meats 




Sterling Drugs 


Arrid Roll On 


Hudson's Bay 




Pam Dry Fry 




Super Suds 


Carters Liver Pills 


Imperial Tobacco 


Perma Starch 




Supreme Drugs 


Rise 


Instint Maxwell 


House Coffee 


P & C 




T.C.A. 


Certo 


(ergens Lotion 




Tide 




Tea Council of Canad 


Christie Brown 


)im Dandy 




Ivory Snow 




Texaco Oil Co. 


CIL Paints 


Kelloggs 




Ivory Soap 




Uncle Ben's Rice 


Clorets 


Lever 




Joy 




Welch's Grape Juice 


Colgate 


Wisk 




Crisco 




Westminster Paper 


Lustre Creme Shampoo 


All 




Spic and Span 




Whitehall Pharm. 


Brisk 


Good Luck M 


"g. 


Camay 




Anacin 


Dental Cream 


Lux 




Cheer 




Heet 


Halo 


Liquid Lux 




Dreft 




Ojtgro 


Vel 


Surf 




Oxydol 




Bisodcl 


Pink Liquid Vel 


Pepsodent 




Gleem 




Rcsdcn 


Dentyne Chewing Cum 


Praise 




Jest 




Wildroot 


Domestic Shortening 


Lushus 




Py-Co-Pay Tooth 


Brushes 


Windex 


Dominion Rubber 


Marshall Wells o 


f Canada 


Q Tips 




Woodward's 



KVOS TV 

(CANADA) LTD. 




one TV station 



^'sn^-^- 




had to be unique 



VANCOUVER OFFICES— isey West Broadway. REgent 8-5141 
STOVIN-BVLES LIMITED— Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg 
FORJOE TV INC. — New York. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
ART MOORE and ASSOCIATES— Seattle. Portland 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 19.S9 



69 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



% 



L 



-J 



Are you, as an advertising executive, missing out on important information 
when you refer all media salesmen to agency timebuyers? R. C. Embry, v.p. 
of WITH, Baltimore, speaJis here for scores of thoughtful radio men in outlin- 
ing a serious problem of business communications. He says most policy makers 
dont have a chance to learn vital radio facts. Is this true in your oivn shop? 
Why not send us your views on this problem, and on "The Seller's View- 
point" series? We loould be interested in hearing your comments on both. 




Policy-makers just don't kno^ 



^%lniost without exception, station representatives, mana- 
gers and salesmen, in their contacts with agencies, talk to 
the timebuyers. Very seldom does the station sales repre- 
sentative have any opportunity to talk to the policy-makers 
who actually determine the strategy of the national adver- 
tiser in the use of media. 

Advertising managers of large corporations are loath to 
talk to media representatives, generally referring them to 
the agencies, which is only natural, since their time would 
be consumed if they allowed themselves to be besieged by 
the many media salesmen who would like to talk to them. 

But, at the agency itself, the account supervisor or ac- 
count executive very rarely will talk to any media repre- 
sentative. He invariably refers him to either the print buy- 
er or the timebuyer. Consequently, the radio representa- 
tive has a very difficult job getting through to the right 
person so that he may properly present the many com- 
petitive advantages of his particular medium. 

Unfortunately, most corporation executives are almost 
completely unaware that they can receive tremendously 
greater impact from radio spot than from newspaper adver- 
tising at the national rate. 

In Baltimore, for example, a full-page ad in one of the 
papers would cost in excess of S2,500 for space alone. This 
one full page with maximum readership may reach around 
00,000 to 70,000 people. The impact of the ads may be 
felt for three or four days, along with any further use the 
corporation's representatives can make with the tear sheets. 
Contrast this, if you will, with the same amount of money 
spent on a spot campaign over any one of the major sta- 
tions. It would be possible for a schedule of 15 one-minute 
announcements per week for 13 weeks, or 195 one-minute 
announcements to be bought for the same approximate 
amount. A schedule of this type would have 2^/0 to 3 mil- 



lion home impressions made over a 13-week period. It 
would reach, at one time or another, in excess of 90% of 
the population; whereas, no Baltimore newspaper has as 
much as 50% penetration of the market of this entire cir- 
culation. 

I am firmly convinced that very few corporation execu- 
tives realize this tremendous advantage that radio has to 
offer from a penetration and frequency standpoint. 

Again, compare this with television cost. One 20-second 
announcement in AA time on a Baltimore station costs 
$350 and would be fortunate to have a rating of 20 — which 
in this market would reach around 100,000 homes. 

The same amount of money would buy in excess of 30 
one-minute announcements a week in radio, which would 
cover seven days a week with more than four announce- 
ments per day, and for an aggregate rating total of 100 to 
150 points. In other words, the advertising would reach 
six to seven times as many homes with much greater fre- 
quency and certainly much greater total impact for the 
same amount of money. 

Radio sets are in better than 98% of the homes, 85% of 
the automobiles, plus thousands of sets in businesses and 
public places. In addition, there are thousands of portable 
transistor radios being used daily. 

Another unique advantage of radio is the ability it gives 
the advertiser to reach his desired audience through proper 
selection of time and station. 

It is my firm belief that, when America's leading busi- 
nesses thoroughly realize the tremendous value available in 
radio today, there will be no way to accommodate the 
many who get on the "bandwagon" too late. The lucky 
ones who realize the value of radio, by continuing to use it 
to their great advantage, have stolen the march on their 
competitors. ^ 



70 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



NEW GAME! FIND T H E ^A R M E R* 
. . . in the Land of Milk andlConey! 



:soi^) 



^^f" 



^ 




\ 




Answer's easy. Tl||y're|^oth farmers — well-heeled dairymen living 
in the bountiful Land of Milk and Money. This market of ours is story- 
book stufF . . . scores of small cities and thousands of big dairy farms 
. . . 400,000 TV families enjoying CBS-ch. 2 television. 
So, cultivate our Farmers, and win the Game! :. 

* A Wisconsin farmer is distinguishable today only by his added incr^^^ 



,^m 





SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 1959 



71 







The Quizzes and the TIO 

In a sense, the timing could hardly have been worse. Just 
as the new Television Information Office was opening its 
doors, and before TIO director Lou Hausman had a chance 
to hire a staff or even buy paper clips, the full fury of the 
quiz show investigation erupted in the newspapers. 

He was, of course, immediately hectored and harried to 
make statements and speeches and give detailed plans of what 
TIO proposed to do about the quiz situation. 

We think it is greatly to Hausman's credit that he refused 
to be stampeded into hasty, ill-considered, flag-waving pro- 
nouncements. 

A lesser man than the CBS veteran might easily have fallen 
flat on his face in his zealous eagerness to act and sound like 
an industry "spokesman." 

Hausman, however, made no such error. In his addresses 
to the Fall Conferences of the NAB, he has said simply that 
he approaches the TIO job with the conviction that it requires 
four things — admitting mistakes when they've been made, 
correcting mistakes when they're recognized, defending and 
publicizing the many fine things which the industry is doing 
and explaining the mechanics of the business to a public 
which is surprisingly ignorant of many practical tv problems. 

SPONSOR, having talked at length with Hausman about his 
objectives and plans for the TIO, believes that his approach 
is sound, thoughtful and constructive, and one which the in- 
dustry greatly needs. 

And in a larger sense, it is probably a good thing that TIO 
has begun operations in the midst of the quiz show uproar. 
The very violence with which the newspapers and magazines 
have played up the Washington disclosures clearly drama- 
tizes the industry's need for better public relations. 

SPONSOR, which once was somewhat skeptical about the TIO 
project, now urges its strong enthusiastic support by all sta- 
tion, network and advertising men who are genuinely con- 
cerned with tv's welfare and future. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A greater awareness 
on the part of agencies and advertisers of the 
continuing need to improve their radio and tv 
commercials. The sales message is the heart 
of all air media advertising; don't neglect it. 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Quiet, please: Tv Guide reports an 
lowan who can't watch Westerns on 
his tv set because a skunk that lives 
under his house reacts strongly to 
gunplay. Can't be too careful about 
audience composition. 

Authority: Guest on a recent Hy 
Gardner Shoiv on WNEW-TV, New 
York, was Tommy Manville, who dis- 
cussed romance. Nice to have some- 
one on a tv show who doesrit have to 
be supplied with the answers. 



Payoff: For six months a Portland, 
Ore., woman has been submitting 
serial numbers from dollar bills to 
KGW in an attempt to win that sta- 
tion's Lucky Dollar contest. She 
hasn t won yet, but reports she has 
saved $516. 

Progress: The University of Mel- 
bourne surgery department has de- 
veloped a tv camera small enough to 
swallow. Just the thing for those 
Bufferin commercials. 

That commercial again: From 

Eddie Hubbard, d.j. at WON, Chi- 
cago — "The Scotchman who makes 
kilts for African head-hunters is now 
known as 'The Shrinking Man's 
Kilter.' " 

Exeunt gracefully: Manager of a 
West Coast branch sent to manager 
at New York HQ this note he found 
on his desk, left by a new adman he'd 
hired four days earlier: "I think it 
best we call it a day. Please send 
check to my home address. . ." 

Suggestion box: It's been rumored 
that spot tv advertiser Nair, maker 
of depilatories, is coming out with a 
"Yul Brvnner Do-it-Yourself Kit." 

Ja wohl: Phil Stone, CHUM, Toron- 
to, reports the old tv Hopalong Gas- 
sidy movies popular in West Ger- 
many. Some titles — "Der SherrifE 
Von Kansas," "Wild West Bandit- 
ten," "Der Konig Von Texas." 

Out of home: A Reuters dispatch 
from London says Lord Brabazon of 
Tara, president of Britain's Radio In- 
dustry Council predicts that "within 
a few years we shall carry a television 
set in our jacket pockets." Out-of- 
home listening is fast becoming "out- 
of-pocket." 



72 



SPONSOR 



31 OCTOBER 19591 



1 



INTRODUCING THE NEW WIL BROADCAST HOUSE! 




Never before in the history of radio has St. Louis enjoyed the full richness of radio entertainment now presented 
by WIL in their magnificent new Broadcast House. 

No effort has been spared to make WIL in St. Louis the nation's finest broadcasting facility. Every modern 
development in electronic communications, including the nation's largest installation of A.T.C. (Automatic 
Tape Control), has been provided for that extra measure of listening pleasure that St. Louis has come to expect 
from the station they call their own. Perhaps that's why Radio WIL is First in every nationally recognized 
audience survey in the country— Pulse, Hooper, Nielsen, & Trendex. 

WIL is proud of its outstanding new home. Here are facilities that reflect not only the success of WIL but the 
vital, progressive, generous spirit of St. Louis and all its people, as well. 

But, of course, our greatest pride— our biggest pleasure— lies in the ability of WIL to bring to YOU the ultimate 
in radio listening pleasure and service. 

The welcome mat is always out at WIL Broadcast House . . . YOUR Radio Station in St. Louis! 




WIL ST. LOUIS 

SOLD NATIONALLY BY ROBERT E. EASTMAN 



WIL 

St. Louis 

K80X 

Dallas 

WRIT 
Milwaukee 



THE BALABAN STATIONS 

in Tempo with tiie Times 
John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director 




You can't cover 
growing Jacksonville 
without WFG A - TV 




Bustling greater Jacksonville — which just hit half a million population 
— soon will have the finest sports arena in the deep, broad South. 

The S3 million Jacksonville Coliseum, seating 12,000, will be completed 
in September, I960. It will attract championship boxing matches and 
other top-ranking sports events. 

Jacksonville's tremendous business growth is prime news in the 
economic world. It's a Si 1/2 billion market that's ready and waiting 
for your sales message. WFGA-TV, with the best of two great net- 
works — NBC — ABC — is an absolute must to drive home your message 
in this rich, burgeoning market. 



JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA 

The Best of NBC and ABC . . . Call Peters. Griffin Woodward. Inc. 



1^ 



7 NOVEMBER t»S» 
AOi m copy • SS m ymmr 




Makes 

you feel 

like a king 

every day! 




flOV 6 1959 

NBC GENfcKAL LltiKARY 



KPnc - TV 



HOUSTON , TEXAS 

'he best faces 
Ktch KPRC-TV 
Channel 



2 



Courtesy of KING'S MEN 




Fresh up yourself 
and your day with 

KPRC-TV- known 
ever3rwhere as the 
world's finest tele- 
vision. It's a habit 
you'll enjoy. 



OVER THE TOP 
IN 1959! 




Time, talent and com- 
mercials expenditures 
put spot radio/tv into 
billion-plus market 




Page 31 



'Costs a hell of 
a burden/ says 
ANA'S Al Brown 

Page 34 

Why retailers 
are using new 
tv ad patterns 

Page 36 



Megatown: three- 
ring sign of 
U.S. living 

Page 39 



N PAGE 



KPRC-TV IS REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



0»' % 






^4^ 



THE 



quality 



TOUCH 



Transistor made by TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INC. 




WFAA 



radio & television • dallas 



Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORTH market 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



The amazing transistor. . . no larger than a match 
head, yet opening up electronic miracles 
never before dreamed possible. So minute, 
so exacting, it truly takes a quality touch to 
devise such an engineering masterpiece. 

The quality measure of today's better radio 
and television stations requires